Definition of positivistic in US English:

positivistic

adjective

Philosophy
  • See positivism

    • ‘And though the highly effective sniping of his so-called positivistic period continues, one feels a more comprehensive grasp of what he is moving towards.’
    • ‘Some philosophers and philosophically-minded physicists may have been misled on this score by their allegiance to an excessively positivistic epistemology of science.’
    • ‘The behavioral approach was based on a logical positivistic philosophy of science, which was strongly empirical and in which the unit of analysis was the actions of human agents, making decisions to advance their values.’
    • ‘The numerous advocates of Comte's positivistic philosophy understood mathematics and physics as the source of rigorous laws and consequently the foundation on which other disciplines might be based.’
    • ‘This interpretation implies that irrationalism is blamed on the dark side of the positivistic Enlightenment, rather than arguing that German fascism arises out of lebensphilosophie as the other of reason.’
    • ‘Not only does the positivistic approach fail to separate the mathematician after she has found the proof from her younger self, but it also gives her the same status as her colleagues.’

Pronunciation

positivistic

/ˌpɑzədəˈvɪstɪk//ˌpäzədəˈvistik/