Definition of posh in English:

posh

adjective

informal
  • 1Elegant or stylishly luxurious.

    ‘a posh Munich hotel’
    • ‘We meet in a tiny plush room in a posh London hotel which is the regular haunt for such interviews.’
    • ‘Howard, having, bought off all other shareholders was answerable to no one and operated through telephones while living in posh hotels.’
    • ‘Be it a midnight operation to nab criminals or surprise raid on luxurious houses in posh localities, she is always there to lead from the front.’
    • ‘In the middle of the fest, private rooms offering charming traditional and local atmosphere could be rented at prices a few times lower than the posh hotels.’
    • ‘A friend is visiting me and we plan to lunch at a posh hotel.’
    • ‘These guests seriously enjoy dressing up in very posh frocks and stylish black ties for dinner.’
    • ‘The fact that I was traveling to an exciting new city with a posh hotel room didn't hurt either.’
    • ‘We were surrounded by the old-fashioned glamor of the lobby of the grandest hotel in this posh French seaside resort.’
    • ‘The crowd is a mix between trendy hotel visitors and posh Londoners.’
    • ‘Hampstead is rich, posh, exclusive, arty, cosmopolitan - little of which appears to have rubbed off on me.’
    • ‘In our posh London hotel suite, she glides through, thanks the press girl, and is regally solicitous when a tape recorder coughs and dies.’
    • ‘Loser buys the winner two rounds of drinks on opening night at the hotel's posh bar.’
    • ‘I've left the comforting surroundings of rural Norfolk, and I'm staying in a posh hotel in Marylebone Lane, London.’
    • ‘For my birthday, my friends and I ended up in Harry's Bar, a very posh and luxurious bar in a posh and luxurious part of town.’
    • ‘A grand bash to celebrate his birthday was held in a posh hotel only five days earlier.’
    • ‘Many of those calls he says come from posh hotels and prestigious New York addresses dispelling the myth that bed bugs only reside in filth.’
    • ‘A lilac purple with touches of green and gold make the dining area welcoming and elegant, cosy but posh.’
    • ‘I got a room at a posh hotel in Dorchester, for the night after the wedding, and the night after that, paying far more per night than I could afford.’
    • ‘Or is there anyplace at all left in the world now where one can swagger around in stylish khaki like a posh colonial looking for some game to shoot?’
    • ‘He's probably still waiting for you at his flat or posh hotel, whatever it is.’
    • ‘The situation is the same when I visit hotels and posh offices.’
    smart, stylish, upmarket, fancy, high-class, fashionable, chic, luxurious, luxury, deluxe, exclusive, select, sumptuous, opulent, lavish, grand, rich, elegant, ornate, ostentatious, showy
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1British Typical of or belonging to the upper class of society.
      ‘she had a posh accent’
      • ‘He dubbed himself Alistair, traded in his homely Midlands accent for one closer to Mayfair, and cultivated a posh circle of friends.’
      • ‘A posh boy from the Home Counties is rewarded for his self-discipline, hard work and ambition.’
      • ‘Soon, the car pulled into the car park of the most upper-class, posh and wealthy sports club in the entire state.’
      • ‘And he saw the cubs and adults roistering on the huge expanse of lawn that belonged to the posh street running parallel to Hillside Drive.’
      • ‘There are some very funny lines peppered around and Neve Campbell does a very good posh English accent - but this is something of a one-trick pony.’
      • ‘Bourne melds eloquent dance moves and witty everyday gestures to evoke crumbling class divides in this story of the downward spiral of an upper-class man and his posh girlfriend.’
      • ‘She was short, with big curly brown hair and a little bald husband, and she was always cheery and happy and had an improbably posh accent and as with most such people a fearsome temper that you really didn't want to provoke.’
      • ‘Her posh accent left no one in doubt as to her upper class breeding.’
      • ‘Despite my southern accent, I am not what you would call posh.’
      • ‘Her accent is unredeemed posh but her politics are Old Labour.’
      • ‘Thankfully, the days when a posh accent implied intelligence are fading fast, partly under the pressure of modern media.’
      • ‘But whilst sounding posh seems to have become deeply unfashionable amongst upper class youth, the lifestyle that goes with posh hasn't.’
      • ‘At Betty Parsons's antenatal classes, which were very Sloaney and posh, I was the only short, fat Jewish mother.’
      • ‘I have the posh education, I have the posh accent, I'm not a bad shot.’
      • ‘And there is something very patronising about people with posh accents telling working-class people that their windows are too dirty.’
      • ‘Oh, and people with unpleasantly posh Home Counties accents who speak far louder than they need to in an enclosed space should probably be gagged with gaffer tape.’
      • ‘I say supremely in an upper-class, posh sort of tone.’
      • ‘Without that fragility, nobody would watch this posh woman with a cut-glass accent.’
      • ‘I come from Chigwell don't you know - the posh part of Essex.’
      • ‘‘I have said to you before that if you have a PhD and a posh accent from a school like yours, you are regarded as a sophisticate,’ he said.’
      upper-class, aristocratic, upmarket, home counties
      View synonyms

adverb

British
informal
  • In an upper-class way.

    ‘trying to talk posh’

noun

British
informal
  • The quality or state of being elegant, stylish, or upper-class.

    ‘we finally bought a color TV, which seemed the height of posh’
    • ‘Not proper posh - they're all East End types made good.’
    • ‘They're right posh, and spawning, but people don't go onto Parkinson to be treated like disobedient children.’
    • ‘I've been to a tonne of media events that sound dead posh (some were) but were all about work.’
    • ‘Its a settee, occasionally a couch if we're feeling posh.’
    • ‘And we didn't see much of him until recently (too posh for us lot, some say) but now his mother is seriously ill and, to give him his due, he visits her every couple of days.’
    • ‘It is often informally referred to by the British middle class as a BBC accent or a public school accent and by the working class as talking proper or talking posh.’
    • ‘We do them up dead posh - swimming pools, jacuzzis, the lot.’
    • ‘Move over trailer trash here come the park home posh.’
    • ‘He too gave off an air of upper-classness, but, like his father, he didn't seem at all posh.’
    • ‘Lytham is dead posh, with lovely seaside cottages and a wide grassy prom facing the Southport straits.’
    • ‘But it's a nice wee place, and is dead posh to boot, so it's survived pretty well.’
    • ‘My bullying started on the very first day at school and I was called a snob and posh because I had a different accent to the rest of my classmates.’
    • ‘When I first joined, after I'd been in art school, I was understudying and they thought I was posh because I didn't happen to have a broad Glasgow accent.’
    • ‘They come across as a little bit unhinged, a little bit posh (or at least upper - middle), but actually quite charming and disarmingly open.’
    • ‘The economic implications of the new posh having big rather than small families are enormous and will be initially felt in the children's services game.’

Origin

Early 20th century: perhaps from slang posh, denoting a dandy. There is no evidence to support the folk etymology that posh is formed from the initials of port out starboard home (referring to the practice of using the more comfortable accommodations, out of the heat of the sun, on ships between England and India).

Pronunciation:

posh

/päSH/