Main definitions of pose in US English:

: pose1pose2

pose1

verb

  • 1with object Present or constitute (a problem, danger, or difficulty)

    ‘the sheer number of visitors is posing a threat to the area’
    • ‘A careful consideration of all the relevant objective evidence indicates to us that the present conditions pose no risk on removal to persons like the appellant.’
    • ‘However, despite the grave and imminent danger posed by this threat, the national threat-levels are not going to be raised.’
    • ‘Since then, it seems the Government has become wiser to the problem posed by the presence of too many ‘culturally incompatible’ foreigners.’
    • ‘The language skirts the problem posed by the U.S. constitutional prohibition on U.S. forces being under the command of a foreign commander.’
    • ‘In the 1970s lead also posed a serious problem, making up some 40 per cent of the total costs.’
    • ‘In court you will also have to demonstrate that the tree poses a risk or danger to you.’
    • ‘A leader in the magazine even suggests that Camilla's Roman Catholicism will pose no constitutional difficulty.’
    • ‘This bulging population poses a big problem for the city.’
    • ‘Given that he has not been charged and that there has been no evidence presented that he poses any danger to the community, I would expect him to win it.’
    • ‘Aside from the low number of patients in each study, the heterogeneity of these populations of patients poses a problem for interpreting the data.’
    • ‘Although reports indicated he posed a risk at present there was some hope for the future because he was studying and working hard in custody, and had a supportive family.’
    • ‘Even if Swann and White still can rush the passer, their presence poses some problems.’
    • ‘To justify the death penalty, the Texas sentencing jury has to find that the defendant will always pose a risk of danger to others.’
    • ‘But the disclosures posed presentational problems for the Prime Minister as he made the case for university top-up fees.’
    • ‘Concerns about the nuisance and danger posed by fireworks could lead to new laws laying down major restrictions on their sale and use.’
    • ‘Among the major considerations to be taken into account would be the rate base of the town and at present that could pose problems.’
    • ‘They advise against the sales of items that could be faulty and pose a danger risk like the brakes failing on a pushchair.’
    • ‘The ageing population will pose an increasing problem.’
    • ‘However, by her own admission, she too was aware of the potential danger posed by their presence.’
    • ‘Sometimes, his remarkable hospitality poses problems for his visitors.’
    constitute, present, create, cause, produce, give rise to, lead to, result in
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    1. 1.1 Raise (a question or matter for consideration)
      ‘a statement that posed more questions than it answered’
      • ‘Note that the speaker is posing a question - it is not a statement of doubt, but a query.’
      • ‘These issues are likely to include both the immediate ethical dilemmas of medical practice and wider policy issues, such as the ethical questions posed by advances in genetics.’
      • ‘We the electorate now have a chance to pose questions and raise the political debate on this issue in the run up to the forthcoming election.’
      • ‘But just as soon as the question is posed, it is mooted by Amis's perspectives on the cosmic and the mundane.’
      • ‘He was not afraid to raise the most controversial questions posed by medical ethics nor to probe the current boundaries of medical practice.’
      • ‘Second, their willingness to pose such questions suggests that there is considerable interest among their constituents on this issue.’
      • ‘He said: ‘The fire authority must now pose some serious questions about how the whole matter was handled.’’
      • ‘Catching my breath, I turned to my true love and finally posed the question that anyone else would have raised many hours earlier.’
      • ‘An Asian film festival approached from any angle is bound to pose questions of a social and political nature, and raise problematic issues surrounding ethnic identity.’
      • ‘By indirectly posing this question in the film, Rouch compels us to wonder about ‘magical’ possibilities.’
      • ‘Six questions are now posed for our consideration.’
      • ‘You have posed a counterfactual question, an imaginary question.’
      • ‘‘You're really enjoying that, aren't you,’ said Graham, making a statement rather than posing a question.’
      • ‘Better put, the questions being posed by the advance of biotechnology are human questions for all of us.’
      • ‘This is a book that poses important questions and raises crucial concerns about our understanding of this period.’
      • ‘The moderator can then select the questions to be asked and call on the individuals who submitted them to actually pose the questions to the candidates.’
      • ‘And his statement poses vital questions: What does it mean to be a young American citizen in this age?’
      • ‘Once I had posed the question Rose was willing to talk about looking for a place in York Place or Priory Gardens.’
      • ‘As well as raising the possibility of an early leadership challenge, it poses serious questions about the ability of the government ever to guarantee a secure retirement for millions of workers.’
      • ‘In other words, research is done in order to answer questions posed by theoretical considerations.’
      put forward, raise, ask, put, set, submit, advance, propose, propound, posit, broach, suggest, postulate, moot
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  • 2no object Assume a particular attitude or position in order to be photographed, painted, or drawn.

    ‘she posed for a swarm of TV cameramen’
    • ‘Keller's son and daughter also pose for reference photographs and end up in many of his paintings.’
    • ‘I liked the idea that these women had already posed and photographed their horses for a readership of women.’
    • ‘She ends up as a patroness of the arts because she enjoys posing for a nude statue (and seducing the sculptor).’
    • ‘Isabella tilted her head again, in the same pose she had assumed when he first saw her.’
    • ‘Sajovic begins with photographs of live models, posed on the floor to appear weightless.’
    • ‘She also posed for a 1955 painting in which he depicted her wearing the native dress commonly associated with Kahlo.’
    • ‘These men were happy to pose for a photographer and to be identified as soldiers of fortune.’
    • ‘In their advocacy of life drawing, this and his other etchings of nudes posing in the studio might be seen as an argument against model books.’
    • ‘He painted hundreds - if not thousands - of them in the course of his career, portraits of men and women painted from models posing for still life classes at the Royal Academy.’
    • ‘But although his eyes were open the rest of him was still stretched out on the bed, in the same pose she assumed he'd maintained all night.’
    • ‘She photographed various models posed in identical positions and then spliced their various body parts together using computer technology.’
    • ‘She loses her self-respect and confidence and simply assumes the role of Marty's mannequin, posed, positioned, and paid to sing when told.’
    • ‘His elegant, dramatically lit photographs of models posed in ultra-chic designer frocks were his signature style.’
    • ‘These people make eye contact with us or look away, often assuming poses and facial expressions found in earlier traditions of portraiture.’
    • ‘Plus, artists will pose with attendees for photos that can later be framed and displayed in their galleries.’
    • ‘In these pictures you discover, if you have not already guessed while watching, that frequently the performers have posed on the floor and been photographed from above.’
    • ‘Many of the collection's photographs show attractive young art students posing nude individually or in pairs, even in small groups.’
    • ‘The assumption here, that Rembrandt simply posed for himself, can produce conflicting results.’
    • ‘She has already posed for artistic nude photographs in two Australian magazines and describes herself as a model and athlete.’
    • ‘She does not discuss Noguchi's work in depth, nor does she illustrate it except in a few photographs of Noguchi posing beside his sculptures.’
    be a model, model, sit, take up a position, assume an attitude, strike a pose
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    1. 2.1with object Place (someone) in a particular attitude or position in order to be photographed, painted, or drawn.
      ‘he posed her on the sofa’
      • ‘He simply posed the friends around his 17th century home in Threshfield.’
      • ‘This picture is a fresco in the cloister of the Annunziata at Florence, and it is called ‘of the sack’ because Joseph is posed leaning against a sack, a book open upon his knees.’
      • ‘Instead of inquiring of us which would be our favourite poses, they just came straight up and posed us like we were puppets.’
      • ‘An old school chum I haven't seen in 20 years posed her family of four in bathing suits on beach chairs on a snowy day in Syracuse.’
      • ‘They pose their children in front of the buildings for snapshots, just as Seattleites do at the Space Needle and Experience Music Project.’
      • ‘And you could pose them in compromising positions.’
      • ‘Best of all, Hannah is constructed and weighted so you can pose her almost any way you can think of!’
      • ‘Anyway, Eisenberg was great and his work is avidly studied by animation artists, especially his knack for posing characters so they have weight and movement.’
      • ‘‘You just feel silly when you go to an interview and they pose you,’ he says.’
      • ‘Each model is set up with an invisible skeleton that allows him to pose each figure in its 3D environment.’
      • ‘From schoolkids to students and housewives, we are all posed hand to ear, chatting into our own personal communicator.’
      • ‘But folks, who made the decision to pose Jim Collins on a mountain ledge with a dark and stormy night brewing behind him?’
      • ‘He occasionally posed human figures as markers of scale.’
      • ‘Once you've posed your character a snapshot is taken.’
      • ‘Beth spent the rest of the period taking Edie's picture, posing her, and starting the painting with a sketch.’
      • ‘The photographer had posed the dancers in views and collages that disclosed what he considered the repressed subtexts of the ballets.’
      • ‘Mikhailov, a Ukrainian who now resides in Berlin, posed homeless people in his native city, Kharkiv, for studied, intimate photographs.’
      • ‘He posed her against the blank wall of the living room, taking three pictures.’
      • ‘Blair was shaking his head, his face in one of the most disagreeing poses Jim had seen yet.’
      • ‘She didn't change her facial expression in a single one; only in the later pictures did she relax a little and allow the photographers to pose her at all differently to that classic, straight on bust.’
      position, place, put, arrange, lay out, set out, dispose, locate, situate
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  • 3pose asno object Pretend to be (someone or something)

    figurative ‘a literary novel posing as a spy thriller’
    ‘a detective posing as a customer’
    • ‘On some occasions the gang posed as bird watchers and after the victims left their cars they would smash the windows and grab what valuables they could from the cars.’
    • ‘Leeza's large pink eyes widened in total fear as she looked to the person who posed as Skye.’
    • ‘Police have warned the public to be on their guard for two men posing as policemen who prey on elderly victims in their homes.’
    • ‘Abignail stole millions of dollars through forgery and by posing as people he was not.’
    • ‘Then, the killers posed as journalists; this time, they pretended to be defectors.’
    • ‘Elderly people are being warned about bogus callers posing as workmen.’
    • ‘Police fear crooks might try to use the quakes as an excuse to gain access to people's homes by posing as property damage experts.’
    • ‘Rogue street traders may be ripping off Lancaster people by posing as charity volunteers.’
    • ‘A conman who poses as a policeman has been handing out fake speeding fines to unsuspecting motorists.’
    • ‘Police are appealing for witnesses after two people posing as social workers tried to get into a house in Leigh.’
    • ‘An unfeasible and bizarre series of events allowed me to gatecrash with a friend, posing as record company people.’
    • ‘A shop assistant watched in shock as a thief posing as a customer grabbed money from the till before running off.’
    • ‘There have been complaints that people posing as Gardaí have tried to get access to homes.’
    • ‘Undercover cops set up a stall and posed as market traders to catch a gang of mobile phone thieves.’
    • ‘So, the production company need approximately 100 clean cut people to pose as lawyers.’
    • ‘Two men had gained access to the house by posing as policemen.’
    • ‘The spokesman said the gang is organised and poses as a security firm.’
    • ‘The conman enters banks, posing as a customer, before duping staff into allowing him to make a counter withdrawal.’
    • ‘Detectives were tipped off and sent in two undercover officers posing as Church officials.’
    • ‘And at ten o'clock, a team of armed commandos posing as cops busted down our front door.’
    pretend to be, impersonate, pass oneself off as, be disguised as, masquerade as, profess to be, purport to be, set oneself up as, assume the identity of, feign the identity of, pass for, represent oneself as
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  • 4no object Behave affectedly in order to impress others.

    ‘some people like to drive these cars, but most just like to pose in them’
    • ‘I cracked up laughing as Lane suddenly appeared in all her black and pierced glory, bowing to an imaginary crowd before posing for photographs that weren't being taken.’
    • ‘Dressing up time at the weekend and Lolly wasn't too impressed with it while Lucy just posed away all night.’
    • ‘They posed for the artist, but they did not model.’
    • ‘There was one of us being reunited, another of us walking through an open-air market, and the final of us on the beach, posing in some goofy position.’
    • ‘Moreover, whenever people are shown, they are usually going about their daily business rather than posing or behaving heroically.’
    • ‘So while some of the kingpins are posing and posturing with flash and flurry, behind the scenes the big debate on the whys and wherefores of possible arrests is going on.’
    • ‘Given her many public proclamations of awareness and spirituality, you have to ask yourself now if she was just posing for affect before.’
    • ‘While the elder posed and postured and generally made a bloody nuisance of himself, Hilary makes no grandstanding noises or grandiose gestures, and simply gets on with the job in hand.’
    • ‘I particularly liked affecting a Gallic air and posing pretentiously with them in the library.’
    behave affectedly, strike an attitude, strike a pose, posture, attitudinize, put on airs, put on an act
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noun

  • 1A particular way of standing or sitting, usually adopted for effect or in order to be photographed, painted, or drawn.

    ‘photographs of boxers in ferocious poses’
    • ‘Kateryna hugs them and happily poses for photographs.’
    • ‘They will then be photographed in modest poses.’
    • ‘The park's pheasant, called Fred, has become so used to his home that he regularly poses for photographs and shows no fear when approaching residents for food.’
    • ‘Outside, the band pose for photographs in the terraced streets.’
    • ‘After he had decided on a pose, he took photographs to guide him as he worked.’
    • ‘In two months he has designed more than 30 of the figures, each in different poses, from a sitting child to a painter due to be suspended from the top of the church tower.’
    • ‘We removed the bottle and struck a serious pose for the photograph, which made him laugh.’
    • ‘No other female miniaturist painted herself in this pose, although several men did.’
    • ‘But most took photographs in conventional poses, the convention being an important part of the record.’
    • ‘Hofker sometimes painted two poses of the same model with similar backgrounds in the same medium.’
    • ‘They have him photographed in a heroic pose to be put up in a poster on the wall.’
    • ‘Many crew photographs of the nineteenth century show crews in poses reminiscent of school photographs with the entire crew assembled for posterity.’
    • ‘After a rather long time he returns and poses uneasily for his photograph.’
    • ‘Each composition is divided into a grid of nine sections comprising seemingly identical portraits, all painted in the same pose and palette.’
    • ‘Society women quickly took note and queued up to have their portraits painted in similar poses.’
    • ‘People in the paintings were drawn and painted with such intricate poses and expressive details.’
    • ‘It has been suggested that the standing, humble pose of Lincoln recalls his Gettysburg Address at the dedication of the battlefield as a national cemetery.’
    • ‘The participants had to write a slogan, fill a form and pose for a photograph.’
    • ‘He's photographed in a graceful pose of dance, his facial expression and gesticulations unmistakably feminine.’
    • ‘Nakane happily poses for photographs with her awe-struck customers.’
    posture, position, stance, attitude, bearing
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  • 2A particular way of behaving adopted in order to give others a false impression or to impress others.

    ‘the man dropped his pose of amiability’
    • ‘They appeared to be arguing about something, Emilia gesturing furiously while her sister adopted an indignant pose, her hands firmly planted on her hips.’
    • ‘Then as now, the anti-war forces adopted a pose of moral superiority, but were in fact led by traitors, criminals and terrorists.’
    • ‘By contrast, Humboldt adopted a pose of theoretical abstinence.’
    • ‘When she noticed only Giovanni in the room she frowned and dropped her pose, looking disappointed.’
    • ‘So they adopt the pose of warrior but never actually place themselves under fire.’
    • ‘As she speaks she adopts the pose of a sexually assured and admired woman, drawing down one strap of her petticoat to reveal and stroke a glamorous neck and chest.’
    • ‘Like the male poet who adopts a macho pose, church officials are eager to seem suave and worldly.’
    • ‘The president knows that anxiety and anguish are the proper poses to adopt in such times.’
    • ‘On one level, it is only by adopting the pose of freedom fighter that Cappello can confront the great grandfather's dual legacy of burning and blossoming.’
    • ‘In a basic sense, the new movement followed his precedent in unmasking the false poses and images of its era in order to refocus attention on the real racial issues facing America.’
    • ‘The present pose of horror adopted by media and government officials with regard to revelations of torture by the military is a sordid farce.’
    • ‘How long, then, can Stern affect the pose of a bedraggled victim?’
    • ‘He merely adopted the pose of telling uncomfortable truths to his own side; in reality he belonged in the conservative camp all along.’
    • ‘Now's the time when sports observers everywhere adopt a standard pose of indignation, a haughty pooh-poohing of the opinions of the masses.’
    • ‘Nerve successfully reinvents the kids show by abandoning the instructional pose adopted by so many previous teen series.’
    • ‘For the international agencies the use of the issue of war crimes is an easy way to strike a moral pose and claim legitimacy.’
    • ‘Youths seek out shade under trees and adopt poses of nonchalance, but there is an infectious air of languid excitement for the upcoming performances.’
    • ‘When you don't know what you're doing it's usually best to adopt the pose of masterful inactivity and do nothing.’
    • ‘What matters most now is adopting the correct cynical pose about this.’
    • ‘But underneath the hospitality, the cosmopolitan pose, the anecdotes and gossip, one could detect a hint of sadness and disappointment.’
    pretence, act, affectation, facade, show, front, display, masquerade, posture
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Origin

Middle English: from Old French poser (verb), from late Latin pausare ‘to pause’, which replaced Latin ponere ‘to place’. The noun dates from the early 19th century.

Pronunciation

pose

/pōz//poʊz/

Main definitions of pose in US English:

: pose1pose2

pose2

verb

[with object]archaic
  • Puzzle or perplex (someone) with a question or problem.

    ‘we have thus posed the mathematician and the historian’
    • ‘Cognitive scientists pose seed-storage puzzles to birds as a way of sorting out how their brains work and might resemble our own.’
    • ‘But he told the truth and he answered every question she posed him.’
    • ‘Yet nearly half of women with chest pain who undergo coronary angiography are found to have no significant CAD, posing a puzzle for physicians.’
    • ‘All of these things are questions which other scholars are posed.’
    • ‘First, the finding poses an evolutionary puzzle: Why would such a mechanism be adaptive?’
    • ‘Students are posed questions, think and reason to answer the questions, and then receive immediate feedback.’
    • ‘This sequence of events poses a puzzle to scientists: how could life begin in an environment so poor in water and carbon?’
    • ‘Of course, nature poses another little puzzle: the same chemicals that kill mosquito larvae also kill the larvae of dragonflies.’

Origin

Early 16th century: shortening of obsolete appose, from Old French aposer, variant of oposer ‘oppose’.

Pronunciation

pose

/pōz//poʊz/