Main definitions of pop in US English:

: pop1pop2pop3pop4POP5

pop1

verb

  • 1no object Make a light explosive sound.

    ‘corks popped, glasses tinkled, and delicate canapés were served’
    • ‘The drama for residents in nearby Bole Foot began at around 2am as they heard a series of loud bangs - caused by tyres bursting in the heat and air bags popping.’
    • ‘But they know that although champagne corks may be popping in the boardrooms, there is little to celebrate around the kitchen table.’
    • ‘She added that fuses popped regularly and water had been seeping down the walls of their home.’
    • ‘The waitstaff stops mid-clap and looks as if someone had just popped all their balloons.’
    • ‘They find high emotional drama in balloons expanding and potentially popping.’
    • ‘All of a sudden there was a popping, it sounded like champagne popping.’
    • ‘But you could hear all the corks popping as guests felt slightly more comfortable about imbibing a tipple or two.’
    • ‘Democratization there is in its very, very early stages, and could pop like a balloon.’
    • ‘I felt and probably looked like a balloon under pressure, about to pop if anything else filled my head.’
    • ‘Evan wrestled with the wires and the cork popped leaving a spray of wine in its wake.’
    • ‘Seems he was at a kids party where the balloons popped and scared the life out of him!’
    • ‘Champagne corks were popping in unison with the fireworks as people celebrated.’
    • ‘We ran in and rushed around popping all the balloons!’
    • ‘At about 3: 30 the following morning Kathy is woken up by popping sounds resembling small explosions.’
    • ‘When the flash bulbs began popping, one wondered who was more charmed - the children, the artiste or the cameras.’
    • ‘Normal spinal joints often make popping sounds when the joint surfaces are forcefully separated by manipulation.’
    • ‘In the meantime, here's how to keep your cork from popping before the glasses are chilled.’
    • ‘Several bones popped, protesting the sudden movement after being stationary for so long.’
    • ‘His fists tightened until his knuckles popped and the girls' eyes widened.’
    • ‘He was trying to eat dinner - trying because these balloons were popping, quite loudly, every five minutes.’
    go bang, go off with a bang, go off, crack, snap, burst, explode
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1with object Cause (something) to burst, making a pop.
      ‘they were popping balloons with darts’
    2. 1.2 (of a person's ears) make a small popping sound within the head as pressure is equalized, typically because of a change of altitude.
      • ‘At approximately 3,500m altitude, my ears pop, and the mild breeze filtering into the car becomes a cold torrent, and the ascent suddenly increases.’
      • ‘My ears pop, as if submerging in water then resurfacing.’
      • ‘Every now and then my ears would pop with the pressure, despite us having all our windows on the leeward side of the house open.’
      • ‘Toss in the effects of high altitude and make sure to listen closely to your ears popping, because that may be the last sound you hear.’
      • ‘My ears popped as the doors slid open and I looked around.’
      • ‘My ears seemed to pop and then I couldn't hear what anyone was saying.’
      • ‘All the while the water pressed against my temples and I thought that very soon my ears would pop.’
      • ‘She chewed her sour apple gum furiously as the plane took off to help her ears pop.’
      • ‘My ears pop at the change in pressure, so I stick my finger in one and rub it.’
      • ‘‘We were so deeply underground, my ears were popping,’ the MP wrote last August.’
      • ‘This is one of the fastest lifts in Europe, apparently, and as we shot up to the top we could all feel our ears popping.’
      • ‘Ian's head smacked against the bottom of the dashboard and his ears popped from the momentary change in air pressure.’
      • ‘The last thing she heard before her ears popped was his voice.’
      • ‘Such was the pressure difference from top to bottom, your ears would pop and you'd get a nosebleed.’
      • ‘Instantly his ears popped, and the pressure drained out of his head in a dizzying rush.’
      • ‘I remember my ears popping as we rode the elevators to the top.’
      • ‘I wake about an hour later with my ears popping, to discover to my delight, that out of the window as far as the eye can see is pure, white, unadulterated snow.’
      • ‘Rising from the coal rich plains of Shanxi Province, the mountain is accessed by a snaking road which makes the ears pop at every turn.’
      • ‘By carrying them in my handbag, I can also use them in the plane if the noise gets too much, or if the pressure makes my ears pop.’
      • ‘Jenn chewed her gum as the plane landed so her ears wouldn't pop.’
    3. 1.3with object Heat (popcorn or another foodstuff) until it bursts open.
      • ‘They popped popcorn and sat on the floor, all of them wrapped up in a blanket together.’
      • ‘Place the cumin seeds in a frying pan and heat until they start to pop and their aroma is distinctive.’
      • ‘It's probably been a few months since I've heard the ching! of a toaster telling me my toast is done, or the annoying beep of a microwave after it pops my popcorn.’
      • ‘Now, go pick up those flicks, pop some popcorn, and get started on making your own life an award-winning romantic comedy!’
      • ‘Half way through, Crystal had popped popcorn, which Danielle ate like sweet candy.’
      • ‘Every time I have a rough day, she pops popcorn and puts the movie on and quotes all the memorable parts.’
      • ‘Upon returning to Heather's house, we went into her kitchen and raided it for chocolate and popped popcorn.’
      • ‘While I was waiting, I popped some popcorn and checked the fridge.’
      • ‘Sam was in the kitchen, popping popcorn by the smells of it.’
      • ‘I do not want to even write about those boring details like how they popped popcorn or how they washed all the dishes and cleaned their house.’
      • ‘The both of us went to the kitchen to pop some popcorn.’
      • ‘‘Deal,’ Aimée said with a grin and went into the kitchen to feed her yapping dog and pop some popcorn.’
      • ‘Whether your taste runs to Terminator or to Titanic, it's time to set up the plush seats, pop the popcorn, and turn up the volume.’
      • ‘We talked for a while, she had popped some popcorn and was watching tv.’
      • ‘All the recipes I follow tell you to pop the popcorn in a pot with oil and plain popcorn kernels.’
      • ‘He got us a couple of Cokes, popped some popcorn, and then suggested we go up to his room.’
      • ‘Ashlee popped some popcorn and sat down with her friends, thankful she had finished her homework while Sean and Matt were in detention.’
      • ‘It's really good, you pop popcorn, and mix melted butter with sugar.’
      • ‘After Haley and I put on our pajamas, I popped some popcorn, grabbed some drinks and candy and met her back in the living room.’
      • ‘One of the six ways to pop popcorn is with hot air.’
  • 2no object, with adverbial of direction Go somewhere for a short time, often without notice.

    ‘she popped in to see if she could help’
    • ‘The shop is poorly run, inadequately stocked, with indifferent staff, but you can at least pop in and out within five minutes.’
    • ‘We popped next door to the hairdresser.’
    • ‘When I popped in last night to check how he's doing I noticed that his bed, computer and CD player are in one small corner of the room.’
    • ‘My lovely friend Jane G has just popped in to work to see me.’
    • ‘A fortnight ago, I had to unexpectedly pop home from the office.’
    • ‘I popped into the supermarket with the hope of being out again within a few minutes, only to be held captive on the car park due to the complicated road system.’
    • ‘Anyhow, I welcome any readers that popped in here for a look at that post yesterday and decided to stick around.’
    • ‘All of a sudden, the door bursts open and Maggie pops in.’
    • ‘The Minister also popped in to meet the staff and students at Horsforth School during a busy return trip to West Yorkshire.’
    • ‘On Thursday night, she had dinner at The Restaurant on John Dalton Street, where Fran from Travis popped in for a bite.’
    • ‘He had just been released by first club Motherwell which he joined as a teenager after Alex McLeish popped round to the house one night.’
    • ‘Within minutes he popped back in the room with three cans of paint and some brushes.’
    • ‘They popped in to see me and introduce themselves.’
    • ‘They want a copy of my eyesight prescription, so I popped over to my opticians in Farnham this afternoon.’
    • ‘For desert, pop next door to the Veggie House for the best bubble tea in the city.’
    • ‘If you can't pop along to a pressure station there are lots of places where you can get your blood pressure checked.’
    • ‘Joel himself popped in a few moments after, but I hardly noticed.’
    • ‘This is a joke I often make when I pop next door for a Christmas drink or something.’
    • ‘When we popped in to see how things are going, there were half a dozen former regulars of the newly-refurbished Walker's Bar in there too.’
    • ‘Other times he'd leave and pop back in within minutes.’
    go, drop by, drop in, drop into, drop round, stop by, visit
    View synonyms
    1. 2.1with object and adverbial of direction Put or move (something) somewhere quickly.
      ‘he popped his head around the door’
      • ‘Wipe the goose dry, remove the giblets and pop the lemon and herbs inside.’
      • ‘Carter volleyed Carlton into the lead with what looked to be the winner with two minutes remaining but there was still time for Mark Andrews to pop in an equaliser.’
      • ‘He took a quick look and popped the ball over with ease.’
      • ‘During this part of the cooking I had popped a dish in the microwave and left it on full power for 2 minutes.’
      • ‘She popped on reading glasses as she nestled on a wrought iron garden swing, flanked by her children, and began reading from the book.’
      • ‘As she popped a slice of leftover pizza into the microwave for breakfast, she heard a car pull up in the driveway.’
      • ‘I popped in my contacts, wore my best underwear underneath jeans and a t-shirt and met him downtown at a bar.’
      • ‘I am proud of my first attempt at real Italian cooking for the simple reason that it did not involve opening jars of ready-made sauce and popping garlic bread in the oven.’
      • ‘Katie and Matt were boring me this morning, so I popped in a DVD for distraction and watched him get plowed while lying in a sink.’
      • ‘He smacks his lips and pops another few berries into his mouth, clearly relishing their taste and their effect.’
      • ‘I popped my head up quickly and looked at Leon who was standing outside of the passenger side door.’
      • ‘Quinn suddenly popped his head through a door, his blonde hair falling loosely into his eyes.’
      • ‘Ages later a nurse suddenly popped her head around the door and beckoned me.’
      • ‘The door opened and Kelley popped his head into the room.’
      • ‘Johansson popped in the aces, 17 of them in all, and Hewitt did the rest.’
      • ‘I shook my head, and popped an orange slice in my mouth.’
      • ‘The chicken breasts can be stuffed in advance and popped in the steamer when you get in from work.’
      • ‘And if you're not up to cooking a casserole, pop some part-made bread from the supermarket in the oven to get those home-made smells going.’
      • ‘Closing my eyes, I opened my mouth and popped the morsel of food into my mouth.’
      • ‘All you have to do is pop the disc into the tray of the CD-ROM drive of your home computer and wait a few seconds.’
      put, place, slip, slide, push, stick, rest, deposit, set, lay, settle, locate, install, drop, shove, hang, position, arrange
      View synonyms
  • 3no object (of a person's eyes) bulge or appear to bulge when opened wide, especially as an indication of surprise.

    • ‘Her friend opened his eyes and sat up, his mouth hanging wide open and his eyes popping - but he still managed to look good; she was almost envious.’
    • ‘As she was doing this, her eyes popped open, and she looked at the other girl as her memory suddenly returned.’
    • ‘Unfortunately, I was clutching the side of the ride, nostrils flaring, eyes popping, and lips flapping unceremoniously.’
    • ‘She found Tashi bending over her, her eyes nearly popping out of their sockets.’
    • ‘It was perfect timing, for at that moment Daniel's eyes popped open and he started coughing, reaching down to his chest in pain.’
    • ‘My eyes popped open and I nearly screamed out loud at what I saw.’
    • ‘However, others look at us with eyes popping wide.’
    • ‘I took a trip on a sailing ship and when I reached Jamaica, my eyes just popped!’
    • ‘There is another aspect that really had my eyes popping.’
    • ‘His eyes popped open to see the boxes surrounding his bed once more.’
    • ‘I could imagine Natalie on the other line, mouth wide open, eyes popping.’
    • ‘He gave a shrill cry of pain as his eyes popped open wide.’
    • ‘Lindsey's eyes popped open and she stared in horror at Kevin.’
    • ‘The old woman's eyes popped open and she stared at Raven.’
    • ‘When I saw the ad on TV for the championship, my eyes popped open.’
    • ‘Logan's eyes popped open and he jumped up into a fighting position.’
    • ‘I was confused for a second, but then realization hit me and my eyes popped open.’
    • ‘Her eyes were popping and her mouth was agape in horror.’
    • ‘He stood there for a minute before his eyes popped open and his hand dropped.’
    • ‘The face is furious, the eyes popping with rage: Gerry Marsden looks like the combative bantamweight boxer he used to be before he became a pop star.’
  • 4no object Appear brighter or more striking in juxtaposition with something of a different or complementary color.

    ‘she added a slick of red lipstick to make the outfit pop’
    ‘gray creates a calm, neutral backdrop that lets other colors pop’
    • ‘I absolutely love how the color of your portable fireplace pops against the purple walls.’
    • ‘The interior boxes have a wash of hot pink that really pops next to its simple wooden container.’
    • ‘I used lavender petunias, and the coolness of the color really popped against the dark, glossy green peppers.’
    • ‘The sculpturally framed staircase is painted bright yellow that pops from the forest's green hues.’
    • ‘The style suits her slight frame, and the color pops perfectly against her complexion.’
    • ‘She would have the required tan to make the colours pop!’
    • ‘I would also consider redoing most of the artwork's frames in darker wood finishes or using some color to make them pop more.’
    • ‘The red of ages-old pagodas popped against the thick, green leaves and bright, blue sky for some much-appreciated contrast.’
    • ‘Some ensembles shimmered with metallic accents, while others popped in bubblegum pink.’
    • ‘The white pedestal dining table instantly pops against the muted green wall.’
    • ‘Blue folding chairs pop against the buttery yellow of the balcony.’
    • ‘We took some video of a busy street in Manhattan and the yellow cabs really popped.’
  • 5informal with object Take or inject (a drug)

    ‘people who obsessively drink and pop pills’
    • ‘They hear scary tales about sniffing glue, popping pills and shooting heroin.’
    • ‘She'd tossed back drinks and popped pills all of his childhood, leaving him and his brothers in care of nannies, so what was she doing now?’
    • ‘I've eaten breakfast, popped pills, drunk coffee, now need to shower.’
    • ‘Ogilvy said he could see the day when players are tempted to pop pills or stick needles in their arms to get an edge.’
    • ‘Patricia never recovered from the shock and fell into drinking and popping pills.’
    • ‘She was forced to give up the child and from 15 she worked the freeways, turning tricks for motorists, drinking beer, popping pills and hustling pool.’
    • ‘Considering he's only three, I better keep popping the Advils and never look back.’
    • ‘It's not simply a matter of popping a pill and suddenly zooming ahead.’
    • ‘He demeaned people who were drug addicts while he was popping damn near every legal painkiller on the market.’
    • ‘He was, it seems, referring obliquely to the haze created by all those mind-expanding drugs the beautiful people popped, mainlined and smoked.’
    • ‘You're an egomaniac who tries to escape every kind of trouble he can by popping pills or drinking.’
    • ‘I'm losing track of the point and the facts even when I'm not popping my little orange pills.’
    • ‘And frankly, who wouldn't want to pop a few placid pills or love potions just to escape from the long list of wicked words mentioned above.’
    • ‘He popped an aspirin and drank half a bottle of water, but his tongue still felt dry as sandpaper.’
    • ‘He said some people pop over-the-counter pain relievers like they're candy.’
    • ‘Quickly I popped a couple pills and swallowed them down.’
    • ‘I'd imagine they'll spend the rest of the night popping vitamin C.’
    • ‘It's important to think carefully about the pills you pop or the socially acceptable drugs you use regularly.’
    • ‘If that's all too much to remember, there are a few pills you can pop before the memory-enhancing medication hits the market.’
    • ‘Today's woman can choose to pop a pill, stick on a patch or take an injection.’
  • 6British informal with object Pawn (something).

    • ‘I had to pop the silver, dear.’
  • 7Baseball
    no object (of a batter) hit a pop fly.

    • ‘In the second inning, the Cubs had Run Santo on second and Jerry Kindall on first when Ed Bouchee popped to second baseman Julian Javier.’
    1. 7.1with object (of a pitcher) cause (a batter) to pop up.

noun

  • 1A light explosive sound.

    ‘at first there were just a few pops, perhaps from pistols’
    • ‘This realization is accompanied by a few more ear pops, as it also becomes clear that the train is slowly descending.’
    • ‘The crack of the .380 sounds like a pop to the neighbors, and for that matter, to Elaine.’
    • ‘I froze, gaping for a second until the sound of the detonation, a sharp pop at that distance, shook me out of it.’
    • ‘He worked it for nearly five minutes and was about to give up when it came loose with a sharp pop!’
    • ‘When trying to play this particular CD on my PC, there were numerous cracks and pops in the audio track; about once every 10-15 seconds.’
    • ‘Pogue says he and other witnesses heard what sounded like a pop, followed by four gunshots, in rapid succession.’
    • ‘Eventually, with a squeaky pop, the eggshell explodes.’
    • ‘The floors were emitting ominous cracking noises and loud pops were coming from the walls.’
    • ‘The audio quality isn't the best, a lot of cracks and pops on it, but you know how that is with those old records.’
    • ‘Real-life bullets sound dull, like tiny muffled pops, and the sound is one of the most disturbing you will ever hear.’
    • ‘Unfortunately, this won't remove the clicks and pops from recordings of old LPs and tape hiss from recordings of cassettes.’
    • ‘The sound is halfway between a regular straight-six and a two-stroke engine without the pops and bangs.’
    • ‘The many gunshots in the film are about as underwhelming as I've ever heard even in low budget indie efforts, sounding like little quiet pops instead of loud bangs.’
    • ‘There are a few pops and clicks, but the soundtrack is mostly clean.’
    • ‘Before she knew it ear-bursting pops sounded throughout the almost quiet house.’
    • ‘Should I now be paranoid when I hear clicks and pops during phone conversations on a line that has, up until now, been nice and clean?’
    • ‘However, we did experience problems with lots of crackles and pops on the sound, particularly when some features, such as EAX and CMSS, were turned on.’
    • ‘Across the room, a pane of glass in the window cracked with a sharp pop.’
    • ‘We heard snapping sounds, pops, little explosions, and then the walls bulged out, and we heard a sound like an avalanche.’
    • ‘Once she got into the intersection, she heard a loud pop, and the sound of glass breaking.’
    bang, crack, snap, boom, explosion, report
    View synonyms
  • 2dated, informal A carbonated soft drink.

    • ‘So I stop at the gas station and grab a couple chocolate bars and a bottle of pop.’
    • ‘Everyone at the table held up their drinks, mostly cans of pop or bottles of water, for this little toast, then everyone took a quick drink.’
    • ‘We give them sweets and bottles of pop to thank them for doing the work.’
    • ‘There was already a table set out with various appetizers, bottled water, pop, beer and wine.’
    • ‘Litter will be the result whatever they are drinking, beer or soft pop.’
    • ‘The only food is crisps and chocolate, the only drink water, fizzy pop, Nescafe, or tea with powdered milk, and the only shopping is tat.’
    • ‘I get to the snack bar and buy a candy bar and bottle of pop.’
    • ‘Other areas of concern were high fat choices when eating out and high intake of calorie-containing beverages such as pop and alcohol.’
    • ‘When Charlson, a diabetic, crossed to go into the shop to get a can of pop, she breached her bail.’
    • ‘Consumers of bottled water tend to be more wealthy than those who drink fizzy pop.’
    • ‘PET plastics (polyethylene terephthalate) are the thin, clear bottles used for pop and water.’
    • ‘At least they have the decency to sell headache tablets, orange juice, fizzy pop and complex carbohydrates as well.’
    • ‘They have plastic carrier bags with them, with crisps and fizzy pop and stuff in them.’
    • ‘After I ordered us a large pizza and a bottle of pop, I hung up again and went back over to where Blaine was sitting.’
    • ‘But what happened to the schemes where you got some pennies back for returning your empty bottle of pop to the shop?’
    • ‘A quiet little snack bar located inside a relaxed study area, it deals primarily in pastries and coffee but also has pop, chips and… soup!’
    • ‘A 1950s-style village fête, complete with fizzy pop and squash, warmly greeted Mr Blair as its guest of honour, as people enjoyed the bright April sunshine.’
    • ‘We drank fizzy pop with sugar in it, but we were never overweight because we were always outside playing.’
    • ‘They had bought a sausage roll each and held a bottle of pop in their hands.’
    • ‘Yes, dear reader, ice cream and mineral waters, or soda and pop as they are called today, was indeed a luxury for many Irish people in times past.’
    fizzy drink, soft drink, carbonated drink
    View synonyms
  • 3A patch of bright color.

    ‘I like wearing a neutral outfit with one pop of yellow’
    • ‘Blacks, whites and blues with a few pops of yellow and orange dominated the red carpet.’
    • ‘Wow, those shoes are amazing- such a great pop of color!’
    • ‘To start, Look 1 featured a noir suit jacket folded like leaf petals at the lapel to reveal pops of lime green.’
    • ‘Claire incorporated a pop of pink into her eye makeup to honor the punk theme.’
    • ‘Add a pop of green (mint or otherwise) to your St. Paddy's Day look via a fashionable bag.’
    • ‘This time though I used a touch of gold for that pop of color.’
    • ‘The tribal jewelry mixes pops of bright oranges and blues with warmer tones of gold and brown.’
    • ‘The finishing touch: a pop of sheer pink lip gloss.’
    • ‘We love the pop of color from those green wineglasses.’
    • ‘Gauzy silk and chiffon gowns in floral prints with pops of red and electric blue rounded out the collection.’
  • 4Baseball
    A ball hit high in the air but not deep, providing an easy catch.

    • ‘His defense was so bad that when he caught a pedestrian pop fly in the fifth inning, the Pro Player Stadium crowd gave him a Bronx, cheer.’
    • ‘I would outlaw the current catchers' gloves which break in the middle, making it easier to catch pop-ups.’
    • ‘Although brilliant with the glove, Power became a source of controversy because of the one-handed style that he used on ground balls and pop-ups.’
    • ‘With two out in the fourth, the Yanks had Shane Spencer on second and Scott Brosius on first when Alfonso Soriano hit a towering pop fly in front of home plate.’
    • ‘A few wild swishes, a couple of pop-ups for easy catches, and then a mishit squeezed past first base is enough to keep a streak alive.’
  • 5An attempt.

    ‘he grabs with a paw and hooks about two hundred berries at a pop’
    • ‘I thought no, the going's good, I'll give it one more pop.’

adverb

  • With a light explosive sound.

    ‘the champagne went pop’
    • ‘After the requisite chilling and hearing that satisfying noise of the cork going ‘pop’ I shall certainly raise a glass to your good health.’
    • ‘I felt (and heard) something in my wrist go pop as I lifted Fiona out of her car seat.’
    • ‘I raised the gun and fired a positively perfect shot - the only problem was that it went pop rather than bang.’

Phrases

  • — a pop

    • informal Costing a specified amount per item.

      ‘those swimsuits she wears are $50 a pop’
      • ‘For 99 cents a pop, plus a monthly download fee, you can store a file wherever you'd like.’
      • ‘The sodas were free, but the booze was four dollars a pop.’
      • ‘And by then Edison's stock, which had traded as high as $23 a share in the glory days of 2001, was chugging along at 85 cents a pop.’
      • ‘They spend the time writing, producing and recording the songs and I pay 15 dollars a pop to say thank you.’
      • ‘Not bad for merchandise that went for 10 cents a pop.’
      • ‘At 25 cents a pop, the fun 'n' games won't break the bank.’
      • ‘I mean, the record industry was much happier when they were selling 500,000, a million things at $20 a pop than 500 million songs at 99 cents a pop.’
      • ‘He can make speeches for many thousands of dollars a pop.’
      • ‘They only cost five dollars a pop and come in six different colors: light blue, navy blue, white, olive green, black, and red.’
      • ‘Or the snack vendor in Bella Vista's coffee fields who sells banana chips and fruit juice for about 25 cents a pop.’
  • have (or take) a pop at

    • informal Attack physically or verbally.

      • ‘And for a man who leads with his chin twice a week, he acts awfully surprised when someone takes a pop at it’
      • ‘I'm as guilty as the next man of taking a pop at the London Underground.’
      • ‘Even if it could only make my life, or at most those of my immediate circle, more boring, I still think it worth taking a pop at.’
      • ‘Even more important, though, Wanadoo could get the chance to take a pop at all those critics who described the company as serial complainers and whingers.’
      • ‘The point about political correctness, of course, is that it's an invaluable Aunt Sally, a flimsy paper tiger for anyone to have a pop at when they can't be bothered to come up with a proper argument to back up their position.’
      • ‘Glamorous Victoria takes a pop at the slimming industry’
      • ‘They then moved from turning pop into art to having a pop at the art world.’
      • ‘Mr Clarke said the fact that ‘people feel they can take a pop at authority’ was becoming an increasingly ‘real issue.’’
      • ‘His latest provocative intervention concerns the wanton promotion of pap, and along the way he has a pop at just about everyone.’
      • ‘As Bea threw the vest up in the air, he pranged his pistol out and took a pop at it, missing wildly.’
  • make someone's eyes pop

    • informal Cause great astonishment to someone.

      • ‘I honestly believe that the biggest favour you can do a child is to focus them on the positive, even if that means making light of things that make your eyes pop or your arms go cold.’
      • ‘You could, of course, just vote for her, with my assurance that she is so absolutely brilliant she makes my eyes pop out of my head.’
      • ‘There were the fights over a boy, the struggle with parents, the shopping and clothes that made your eyes pop.’
      • ‘I had seen plenty of extravagance in the marketing of toys, but this magazine ad made my eyes pop.’
      • ‘Maybe Mariucci wasn't the guy who was going to take them to the next level, but who among the candidates really makes your eyes pop?’
      • ‘The sports teams won't make your eyes pop out of your head, in fact there isn't much to see in the game.’
      • ‘The day he arrived at Maxwell, he noticed a ‘beautiful gal in a tight yellow sweater’ who made his eyes pop out.’
      • ‘The first two, both Jomtien based eateries, do a gut-buster fried breakfast for around 150 baht which will make your eyes pop as well as your stomach.’
      • ‘Women have been doing it for a long time - they'll tell you stuff that'll make your eyes pop out.’
      • ‘I kayaked with him in Norway and Turkey and there were waterfalls that would make your eyes pop out just to look at them.’
  • pop the question

    • informal Propose marriage.

      • ‘In 2004, many couples will offer up toasts and kisses, when one partner gets down on one knee and pops the question.’
      • ‘Women wanting their man to propose would most like him to pop the question in a hot geyser pool in Iceland, it was disclosed today.’
      • ‘Alison, 39, decided to take advantage of the Leap Year tradition of women proposing to men when she popped the question before dozens of regulars at their local pub in Hollins.’
      • ‘Eventually he pops the question and the wedding adventure of the year is on.’
      • ‘As Georgie and Gabe drive away, Gabe pops the question and Georgie accepts.’
      • ‘Now all you have left to think about is popping the question, enjoying the superb first-time fiancé sex and saving up for the 10-year anniversary diamond size-up purchase.’
      • ‘Then one day, out of the blue, we're going for a drive to dinner arguing about nothing and he stops the car and pops the question, giving me a ring.’
      • ‘They have been sweethearts ever since, with Lily, perhaps running out of patience, popping the question to Morgan during a romantic break in Paris on Valentine's Day last year.’
      • ‘In October he decided to lay plans to pop the question and started thinking of original ways to propose.’
      • ‘Her limo driver took a slight detour and dropped the unsuspecting girlfriend at the City Hall reflection pool and Christmas tree, where Pollack was waiting with a ring and plans of popping the question on bended knee.’

Phrasal Verbs

  • pop off

    • 1Die.

      • ‘Raymond Brown also died recently; all these great guys have all just popped off.’
      • ‘I felt like cheering when she finally popped off.’
      • ‘I just want there to be street parties when he pops off.’
    • 2Speak spontaneously and at length, typically angrily.

      ‘I've been thinking about it a lot—I don't want you to imagine I'm just popping off’
      • ‘But what I'm wondering is, is this going to make people at home when they see various pundits popping off on shows say, I wonder who is paying that guy?’
      • ‘So please, if you care about us, do not post any messages when Mike pops off about me in the future (as you know he will).’
      • ‘If the election doesn't go your way, don't pop off as though America were Guatemala under the generals.’
      • ‘If we were just a group of people popping off on policy, I don't think we would do anyone any good.’
      • ‘We were letting them pop off, vent, and God knows what they said.’
      • ‘Now, you pop off on your blog, among other professional pursuits.’
      • ‘Don't want to pop off and give your liberal views?’
      • ‘He is giving interviews to one news outlet after another, popping off in various more or less inconsistent directions.’
      • ‘Sharpton is the race's ragged edge, its propensity to pop off and speak out of turn; he's the political id that blacks are constantly encouraged to throw away in the spirit of progress and cooperation.’
      • ‘Anyway, they would pop off with full-length reviews of whatever they'd happened to be listening to at the time, be it from the past week or from 20 years earlier.’
  • pop up

    • 1Appear or occur suddenly and unexpectedly.

      ‘these memories can pop up from time to time’
      • ‘Richard Askwith reports on the mysteries of the giant squid, a profoundly elusive creature that suddenly seems to be popping up everywhere’
      • ‘Look, what people really say about this is well why has it suddenly popped up now as an issue?’
      • ‘So if water features and decorative stone paving suddenly start popping up around the Huntington Stadium pitch, you know who's to blame.’
      • ‘I should add that at one point in the animation, the Loch Ness Monster appeared to pop up in the background.’
      • ‘Suddenly a commercial pops up for Colgate toothpaste.’
      • ‘There is no campaign and suddenly his name pops up, clearly presented by the British and the French who have been impressed by his negotiational ability.’
      • ‘Why has the bespectacled figure of Kevin Rosenberg suddenly popped up in a corner of my mind?’
      • ‘So much for these chain stores that appear to be popping up all over the country.’
      • ‘A petite figure suddenly popped up from behind the couch.’
      • ‘I keep expecting him to just suddenly pop up and surprise me.’
      • ‘And people might not donate if 18 years down the line a few children were to suddenly pop up!’
      • ‘I don't know what it is but certain phrases seem to suddenly pop up on my TV whenever politicians are giving speeches or pundits are discussing politics.’
      • ‘This was a common occurrence, meteor storms suddenly popping up without warning.’
      • ‘Further, with old and new problems popping up together, it appears our political and economic turmoil will never end.’
      • ‘It's an argument worth having, especially since more paid-for results appear to pop up every few months.’
      • ‘It was so silent that it was like one of those movies where suddenly a murderer pops up out of the bushes to attack the helpless woman.’
      • ‘And where they appeared, counter-protesters also popped up - to keep the other side from hogging the cameras.’
      • ‘Suddenly an alert popped up on her computer and she read it.’
      • ‘I started to walk towards the food court, planning to get something to eat when Matt suddenly popped up beside me.’
      • ‘I was scrolling through my server logs this morning, clicking on links to any of the incoming domains I didn't recognise when suddenly something very familiar popped up.’
      appear, appear abruptly, appear suddenly, appear unexpectedly, occur abruptly, occur suddenly, come into sight, come into view, materialize, arrive, make in an appearance, put in an appearance
      View synonyms
      1. 1.1(of a browser window) appear without having been requested, especially for the purpose of advertising.
        • ‘Right click and click "Stop" on the pop up menu.’
        • ‘You see the warnings indicated by the red popping up on the screen.’
        • ‘It also pops up a screen asking you for permission to enter the site, all according to the rules.’
        • ‘You can float the mouse over the button and a tool tip will pop up with the command name.’
        • ‘Clicking on any of these pictures will pop up a bigger one.’
    • 2Hit a baseball high into the air but not deep, providing an easy catch.

      ‘in three at bats, he struck out twice and popped up’
      • ‘If Seabol had popped up, there would have been hell to pay.’
      • ‘Moose then induced Darrell pop up for the second out, and it looked as if he might send the game into extra innings.’
      • ‘Trent's first inning went by without incident - a strike out, a ground out and a pop up - and Ally had expected him to be fairly happy with himself for it.’
      • ‘The vast majority of firebrands have been second basemen, a position often played by smaller men, though feisty shortstops also pop up from time to time.’
      • ‘Lefthanders pitch him outside and force him to bounce the ball to second or pop up.’
      • ‘It used to be a pitcher could get LF Barry Bonds to chase a high pitch and get him to pop up, or get him to pull an outside breaking ball to the second baseman.’
      • ‘The batter popped up a bunt foul behind catcher who chose to catch the foul ball on the fly.’
      • ‘In Bill Singer's no-hitter for the Dodgers in 1970, Philadelphia's Byron Browne popped up around the plate.’
      • ‘Given a shot at a sixth, Musial popped up in the ninth.’
      • ‘With the winning run on second and nobody out, Damon tried to bunt, and he ended up popping up to Posada.’
      • ‘Suddenly a player pops up that you completely forgot was on the pitch.’
      • ‘He was so crafty, that he knew where to spot his pitches and he got me out on a pitch I think he knew I would pop up or not hit real well.’
  • pop for

    • Pay for (something), especially as a treat for someone else.

      ‘I popped for the first three tolls’
      • ‘After being blue-worn in a duty holster, I popped for a hard chrome finish from Armoloy in the middle 1970s.’
      • ‘Relax, try to have some fun for a change and pop for an extra round at the bar after the game.’
      • ‘I popped for the full ride, right down to the flat panel television display.’
      • ‘Will Hispanics readily pop for the extra charges for a digital box plus a special tier?’
      • ‘These frames are a major improvement that will allow those of us who can't or won't pop for a skate to experience the ‘low-rider ‘benefits they provide.’’
      • ‘He is putting the good word out to readers that you too can own these handmade, multiple-track CD-Rs if you're willing to pop for the color covers and postage to wherever it is you reside.’
      • ‘Wish I could do this with the newest model but I'm not intrigued enough to go out and pop for a new phone.’
      • ‘A while ago the Guthrie got $25 million in a bonding bill to pop for the new theater on the Mississippi.’
      • ‘Five dollars bought a nice hotel room; only Patty Berg had enough cash to pop for a room with a newfangled TV.’
      • ‘When a soldier from the area was killed in Iraq, I popped for a one-week subscription to The Rooster to read the feature article.’
  • pop out

    • Make an out in a baseball game by hitting a pop fly that is caught.

      • ‘Carlos Delgado popped out before the game was called with one out in the bottom of the inning.’
      • ‘As the second option, he pops out toward the foul line and then has a turnaround jump shot.’

Origin

Late Middle English (in the senses ‘a blow, knock’ and ‘to strike’): imitative.

Pronunciation

pop

/pɑp//päp/

Main definitions of pop in US English:

: pop1pop2pop3pop4POP5

pop2

adjective

  • 1Relating to commercial popular music.

    ‘a pop singer’
    ‘a pop song’
    • ‘When pop divas make a movie, they have to pretend it's more than a showcase for the soundtrack.’
    • ‘He has never courted publicity for himself - has never wanted to be a pop idol, either, with screaming girls as fans.’
    • ‘Large crowds were gathering outside the palace to watch the pop concert, starring ex-Beatle Paul McCartney, on giant screens.’
    • ‘She began her career in the late '70s (while still in her teens) as a pop singer.’
    • ‘Check out what your favorite pop idols have been up to.’
    • ‘The pop princess was at pains to point out her reputation for tantrums is undeserved.’
    • ‘Similar accusations were once leveled against Paul Simon after the commercial success of his pop album Graceland.’
    • ‘His band have plenty of catchy, commercial pop tunes.’
    • ‘A source claims the pop diva could be six or seven weeks pregnant.’
    • ‘Rock'n'roll groups appeared on bills along with trad groups and pop singers - even some modern jazz made it into the charts.’
  • 2derogatory (especially of a technical, scientific, or academic subject) made accessible to the general public; popularized.

    ‘pop psychology’
    • ‘This does not mean that pursuing a mission is always pleasurable: we do not agree with the pop psychology view that equates meaningful work with fun.’
    • ‘When it comes to understanding consumer debt, why do economists prefer pop psychology to statistics?’
    • ‘Red Dragon's goal of being a smart thriller is also tainted by the cheap and obvious pop psychology used to paint the characters.’
    • ‘It uses our expectations about the fallout of child sexual abuse, hammered home by our culture of pop psychology, to fake us out and sell its mystery.’
    • ‘You should have no problem finding general interest and pop science articles on his work.’
    • ‘Self-esteem as portrayed by the current generation of pop psychologists is nothing less than self-worship, narcissism.’
    • ‘Pinsky cleverly weaves historical events and pop psychology trends into his analyses.’
    • ‘It may be bombastic or vituperative or full of pop psychology, but it seldom presents a critical argument based on facts or logic.’
    • ‘It's as much an outburst of pop psychology as of religious atonement.’
    • ‘It was only after Gray reworked the book and retitled it that it became the bestselling pop psychology book of all time.’
    • ‘It wears thin after a while, but the pace is kept up by Vaguen's malaprops, slightly off analogies and clever reworking of typical pop psychology dogma.’
    • ‘In any case, I tend to avoid the pop psychology and head for the speculative fiction or fascinating non-fiction.’
    • ‘Part of pop psychology is that you should acknowledge your feelings, but there's no place for them in the workplace.’
    • ‘She is often facile, especially when relying on pop psychology.’
    • ‘The pattern here is that businesses are falling for pop psychology fads that have no basis in the true science of psychology.’
    • ‘Or, in the language of pop psychology, were men from Mars and women from Venus?’
    • ‘I could certainly do without a lot of this pop psychology coverage.’
    • ‘Kaufman's interest in pop psychology is less than it seems.’
    • ‘The programme seems to combine elements of pop psychology with an odd form of existentialism.’
    • ‘The film is populated by types rather than people, and its whimsical romanticism is of the sort you'd find in a very slim book of pop psychology.’

noun

  • 1Commercial popular music, in particular accessible, tuneful music of a kind popular since the 1950s and sometimes contrasted with rock, soul, or other forms of popular music.

    • ‘The sound planning and design make sure that the music, whether hard rock or pop, does not overwhelm any conversation.’
    • ‘The result is being billed as an album of experimental yet accessible 21st century pop.’
    • ‘Easum predicts, for example, the quick death of all symphony orchestras that do not soon begin to feature a significant amount of pop and rock music.’
    • ‘The 16-year old short girl sighed as she continued walking, listening to her own CD that contained a mix of pop and rock music.’
    • ‘I'm just blown away by the fusions of Brazilian music and pop, rock, and jazz taking place there.’
    • ‘Red Stage near City hall will feature pop and rock music with Thai ‘Luk Thung’.’
    • ‘What can you accomplish with a mostly ambient instrumental song that you can't with pop or rock music?’
    • ‘The music is mainstream alternative pop and rock music, with little or no variation.’
    • ‘From The Smiths to Nirvana, much of the best pop and rock music has been made by fans.’
    • ‘You download pop and rock music for 99 cent per song.’
    • ‘There is generally a lot of distortion present in modern pop and rock music, and plenty of post-processing done in the studio.’
    • ‘The world-famous Vienna Boys' Choir has departed from more than 500 years tradition to perform pop and rock music.’
    • ‘Because polyphony is restricted pop and rock music demonstrates limited harmony and use of counterpoint.’
    • ‘From rhythm & blues and soul to country and pop, Ray's music defied any labels.’
    • ‘Hence there isn't really anything that could be classified as plain old pop or rock music.’
    • ‘It brings pop, rock, reggae, classical, techno and 80's music into most cars.’
    • ‘This is an infusion of pop, rock and trip-hop that is easy on the ears, but not on the musical conscience.’
    • ‘Alarm clocks were going off, playing rock, Christian pop, jazz or reggae.’
    • ‘Yet, much of the music on it contains a considerable amount of pop, rock, and world music influence.’
    • ‘The category of pop and rock music was left up to the audience to choose a winner.’
    1. 1.1dated A pop record or song.
      • ‘A pop that will only last a couple of weeks.’
      • ‘Turn the record over and you have another winner—‘Add a Little Wiggle’—a masterpiece made out of a song-and-dance ‘pop’.’
      • ‘There's a pop bubbling along beneath the surface, which rears its head in the form of a bouncing, jerking bass-line.’

Origin

Late 19th century: abbreviation of popular.

Pronunciation

pop

/päp//pɑp/

Main definitions of pop in US English:

: pop1pop2pop3pop4POP5

pop3

(also pops)

noun

US
informal
  • another term for father
    • ‘They captivated moms and pops across the country and say, ‘Look, it's time to have another dialogue.’’
    • ‘And thank you, very sincerely, to everyone who sent well wishes to my pops.’
    • ‘I mean people talk about mom and pops, which is really good for creating jobs, but mom and pop cannot deliver against a Home Depot or some of the large supermarkets.’
    • ‘Junior addressed the situation before the game by saying the only way his pops was going to coach there was if he transferred and he's not going anywhere.’
    • ‘Respect your moms, your pops, or whoever it was raised you.’
    • ‘First of all, the mom and pops just simply get subsidized loans.’
    • ‘I guess someone you could say I know pretty well, my pop, Ben Christensen.’
    • ‘But Blake grew accustomed to addressing my pop as his own dad.’

Origin

Mid 19th century: abbreviation of poppa.

Pronunciation

pop

/päp//pɑp/

Main definitions of pop in US English:

: pop1pop2pop3pop4POP5

pop4

noun

North American
  • usually with modifier A piece of flavored ice or ice cream on a stick.

    ‘mango-flavored ice pops’
    ‘frozen fruit pops’

Origin

Late 19th century: originally (in ice pop) shortened from lollipop; in later use probably shortened from Popsicle.

Pronunciation

pop

/päp//pɑp/

Main definitions of pop in US English:

: pop1pop2pop3pop4POP5

POP5

(also PoP)

abbreviation

  • 1Computing
    Point of presence, denoting equipment that acts as access to the Internet.

    • ‘In addition, they pay for the right to place their PoP in the CO of the telecom company.’
  • 2Point of purchase, denoting products or promotions located adjacent to a retail checkout or cashier.

Pronunciation

POP

/päp/