Definition of pollster in English:

pollster

noun

  • A person who conducts or analyzes opinion polls.

    • ‘Then the pollsters started conducting scientific polls of the general population.’
    • ‘The results startled even the pollsters who conducted and analyzed the surveys.’
    • ‘They usually reveal more about the pollsters ' prejudices than the public's opinions.’
    • ‘Political scientists and candidate pollsters track opinion on candidates and issues.’
    • ‘The conflict in views between opinion pollsters over what is going on in the election has reached its most acute over recent polls.’
    • ‘There are many reasons why most journalists, analysts, TV pundits and even the pollsters got it so wrong.’
    • ‘No one should be fooled by the illusory claims of the opinion pollsters.’
    • ‘The findings of these studies puzzled media researchers and opinion pollsters at the time.’
    • ‘Pollsters say that getting a phone call from a pollster is not nearly as unique as it once was.’
    • ‘Nobody will tell an opinion pollster they want less money, still less vote for it.’
    • ‘No one but the pollsters themselves and political fanatics will care which pollster got it right or wrong.’
    • ‘Comparisons between polls done by competing pollsters are absolutely meaningless.’
    • ‘That was perhaps, the most accurate reading of the public pulse that I've seen by pollsters.’
    • ‘The Pakistani commentators and the pollsters are predicting that my party is going to win tomorrow.’
    • ‘I think it's hard for pollsters, in all fairness to them, to measure what's going on out there.’
    • ‘Think about it, you are sitting at home and pollsters are actually calling and acting interested in you.’
    • ‘While most pollsters say they would contact clients whose analyses didn't tally with the numbers, few ever do.’
    • ‘Re-evaluate your budget priorities if over half of your polling is to be conducted by a pollster that is not hired by the campaign.’
    • ‘Millions tell pollsters they would vote Lib Dem if the voting system let them.’
    • ‘Certainly there is broad public support for educational reform, or so the pollsters tell us.’

Pronunciation

pollster

/ˈpoʊlstər//ˈpōlstər/