Definition of plunge in English:

plunge

verb

  • 1[no object] Jump or dive quickly and energetically.

    ‘our daughters whooped as they plunged into the sea’
    • ‘The Inferno, the biggest amateur race in the world, will see 1,800 daredevils plunge down the 15.8km course.’
    • ‘She dove, a beautiful swan dive, and plunged into the crystal clear, saltwater pool.’
    • ‘I watched as two police divers plunged into the frigid East River and quickly collected the corpse.’
    • ‘Around 12 firefighters pulled on breathing apparatus and plunged into the thick smoke to find the seat of the blaze.’
    • ‘And then he turned up at Whitley Bay in full scuba-diving gear, and plunged into the icy North Sea to promote World Ocean Day, only to be almost knocked off his feet by a giant wave.’
    • ‘They plunge into the coastal waters from small boats.’
    • ‘The dog jumped out of Gareth's arms and plunged into the canal where he made his way under a mooring jetty.’
    • ‘Last New Year, police praised Thomas after he and another man plunged into the icy River Foss to save the life of a woman who had jumped from Foss Bridge in Fossgate.’
    • ‘Fire fighters plunged into the burning house but did not find the old couple who were found hidden under the bed after the fire was extinguished a half-hour later.’
    • ‘The right posture not only helps avoid a sore back, it also means better control of the raft by the team as a whole - especially important when you start plunging through rapids.’
    • ‘After landing on a stretch of white beach, we plunged into the forest along a well-cleared path, which made me wonder how many hunters use this area.’
    • ‘Gabrielle had a sudden urge to plunge into the cool lake like before.’
    • ‘She was running at full speed, glancing behind every few seconds, before plunging ahead with even greater speed.’
    • ‘We all jumped off the runners of the helicopter, and plunged into the water.’
    jump, dive, hurl oneself, throw oneself, fling oneself, launch oneself, catapult oneself, cast oneself, pitch oneself
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1Fall suddenly and uncontrollably.
      ‘a car swerved to avoid a bus and plunged into a ravine’
      • ‘He took the narrow bridge too quickly and the car crashed through the bridge and plunged into Poucha Pond, landing upside down under the water.’
      • ‘The Coast Guard is continuing the search for six missing crewmembers who plunged into the sea Wednesday during a rescue attempt.’
      • ‘The aircraft made several circles before suddenly plunging into the sea with its lights out.’
      • ‘A walker who plunged 100 feet down a Lakeland mountainside - suffering serious head injuries - is making a remarkable recovery.’
      • ‘Six minutes and forty seconds after the launch the rocket plunged into the ocean and the test was over.’
      • ‘Children and adults alike were screaming as we were thrown around the sharp corners and plunged down the deep falls.’
      • ‘I did not want them plunged into hardship and so I allowed them to take the two days' holiday pay at the beginning of the dispute.’
      • ‘Sweden, which plunged into financial crises in the early 1990s, has re-invented its famed social model in the past decade.’
      • ‘Children who had plunged 30 feet off the bridge floundered in the muddy waters, trying to reach dry land.’
      • ‘It then hit the side of a bridge before plunging into the eight-meter-deep ravine.’
      • ‘The West African nation plunged into new turmoil when government forces launched a new offensive against rebels in the north.’
      • ‘In Florida, some brave passengers saved their bus from plunging almost 200 feet into the water.’
      • ‘He admits that at the beginning of this year, worried about his health, and genuinely feeling he might die, he plunged into a deep depression.’
      • ‘Two officers drove off a drawbridge last night and plunged 40 feet into the river.’
      • ‘Yet, the household seemed to have plunged into gloom.’
      • ‘The rushing water left a hole about 20 metres deep and 40 metres wide in a road near Salem, and a car that plunged into the crater landed on its top in a creek.’
      • ‘With the country once again plunged into political turmoil, Rudd's insights should prove disturbingly relevant.’
      • ‘Seven passengers aboard a sight-seeing helicopter survive when it plunged into New York's East River just after takeoff.’
      • ‘Consumer confidence plummeted and government intervention appeared to have only cosmetic effect as the global economy plunged into deep recession.’
      • ‘For him, the country has already plunged into civil war.’
    2. 1.2Embark impetuously on a speech or course of action.
      ‘overconfident researchers who plunge ahead’
      • ‘You should also do research before plunging into any new situation.’
      • ‘Veronica opened her mouth to say something, but Raven plunged ahead and cut her off.’
      • ‘He paused for a moment, and then plunged on ahead.’
      • ‘He flinched under my glare, but plunged on, entering my simple trap.’
      • ‘When initially plunging into a project, Alex circumvents storyboards and goes straight to the computer.’
      • ‘If they foresee a need for help, they check an the availability of other people before plunging ahead.’
      • ‘She took a deep breath and plunged on with her practiced speech.’
      • ‘In fact, more than plunging into new newspaper ventures, Black appears to be getting out of the business.’
      • ‘The student may be tempted to plunge ahead with a topic and see what emerges.’
      • ‘Why is the U.S. blindly plunging ahead with such a potentially disastrous and outmoded concept?’
      • ‘Yes, but we need research before we plunge in - this isn't simple stuff.’
      • ‘These limits seemed to threaten the success of the family's on-farm store, but they plunged ahead.’
      • ‘Taking a deep breath, he plunged on with his speech.’
      • ‘He hesitated, surprised by her words, but plunged ahead.’
      • ‘Rather than saying that he would exact bloody vengeance, he plunged into a monologue about the need to convene a hemispheric summit on drug abuse.’
      • ‘He may claim to plunge into ventures just because they seem as if they might be fun, but there's usually much more calculation to it than that.’
      • ‘And he plunged ahead without understanding or preparing for the consequences of the post-war.’
      • ‘The best thing about these mini games is that they don't distract from the main quest, they're there if you want them, but easily ignored if you want to keep on plunging ahead.’
    3. 1.3Suffer a rapid decrease in value.
      ‘their fourth-quarter operating profit plunged 25%’
      • ‘The dollar, according to some reports, could plunge by as much as 40 per cent in value.’
      • ‘We all suffered to some degree and the consequence of that: the country suffered because the economy plunged.’
      • ‘Company officials, according to widely reported allegations, forced employees to hold on to their stock as its value plunged in October and November.’
      • ‘Once the demand for oil is replaced by a demand for another commodity, the current land value of Saudi Arabia may plunge to nearly zero.’
      • ‘Six split capital trusts have plunged in value by 40% and more in the past month alone.’
      • ‘Most investors have borrowed money with stocks as collateral, which means as prices plunge, the value of collateral go down as well.’
      • ‘In the ensuing recession both the stock market and land values plunged to alarmingly low levels, unseen in many years.’
      • ‘With stock markets plunging, people have ploughed their money into property; others have remortgaged their existing homes to give them more cash to spend, fuelling consumer spending.’
      • ‘The transfer market is plunging in value, wages are being depressed and more and more footballers are finding themselves unemployed.’
      • ‘The firm's stockmarket value has now plunged to just £50M.’
      • ‘And good news, plunging rent levels mean even more can move in.’
      • ‘Another day of global volatility on the markets saw share values plunge, with the Irish stock market now down €30 billion since January.’
      • ‘It has become apparent that some homes are considerably more vulnerable to flooding than others, and these are not just riverside properties - whose value is expected to plunge.’
      • ‘Commissions got bidded up and up and the value offered to consumers plunged.’
      • ‘A company's stock price could plunge when earnings fall, but its bonds could remain hot if it has a strong enough revenue stream to service its debt.’
      • ‘The group plunged into the red for the first time in its history with a net loss of £1.7m and said it was selling its private client and fund administration businesses.’
      • ‘The news resulted in their share value plunging 50%.’
      • ‘The value of those properties plunged 64.6 per cent to HK $4.61 billion.’
      • ‘To add to fund managers' misery, in 2001, the stock market plunged rapidly, dramatically reducing the value of their investments.’
      • ‘The company's market value has plunged to $273 million from $145 billion at the end of 1999.’
    4. 1.4(of a ship) pitch.
      ‘the ship plunged through the 20-foot seas’
      • ‘We were at the front of the boat, and that ensured we had a true shower when the boat plunged the watery depths.’
      • ‘It proved necessary to row ashore in a small dinghy, plunging through the hot spray past a Turkish battleship that had been moored for so long that the coral had grown up around it, immobilising it forever.’
      • ‘Cresting over the back of a wave, the boat plunges into a trough and rides up the back of another swell, crashing through into another trough.’
      • ‘This meant climbing to the top of the 80 ft mast in a safety harness, with the yacht plunging in gusts of wind and a choppy sea, and holding on for dear life for five hours while she attached a spare halyard.’
  • 2[with object] Push or thrust quickly.

    ‘he plunged his hands into his pockets’
    • ‘He got as close as he could before plunging his gloved hand quickly into the center of the smoking embers, and drawing out a long blackened object.’
    • ‘Take the tip of a large knife and quickly and firmly plunge the knife downwards through this cross.’
    • ‘Ms Telford said the government was trying its hardest to raise aspirations amongst people from low-income backgrounds, but was only dashing their hopes by plunging them into tens of thousands of pounds of debt.’
    • ‘He tipped the vial over and plunged the needle into it, sucking out the liquid.’
    • ‘She thrust his trench coat at him and gratefully plunged her hands into the cool and cleansing water.’
    • ‘Then, he knelt down and very quickly plunged the knife into it, and edged it around to make a large slit.’
    • ‘He accidentally dropped the stick into the fire and plunged his arm into the flames to retrieve it.’
    • ‘I was plunged into the water among dark shadows with occasional shafts of light.’
    • ‘The minstrel quickly plunged the burning metal rod in the soldier's face.’
    • ‘With the warrior dazed, he quickly plunges his sword into his exposed chest.’
    • ‘China could always recall its debts, crippling the US and plunging the entire world into a black depression (economically speaking).’
    • ‘The coalition alleges that the cuts to bursaries will plunge students into high levels of debt by forcing them to rely more heavily on student loans to finance their education.’
    • ‘Suddenly reminded, Alexia plunged her hand into her apron pocket, and drew out a small jam-jar wrapped with paper.’
    • ‘Turning on the cold water, I plunged my hands into it, and splashed it upon my face.’
    • ‘The Liberal Democrats warned that forcing people to save for their retirement could plunge many further into financial difficulty.’
    • ‘Suddenly the bird plunges its head into the water to catch the fish in its bill crosswise. Then, if the fish is less than one half the length of its bill, it swallows it whole after manipulating it to go down its throat headfirst.’
    • ‘The results were disastrous, plunging the country into deep depression, with high unemployment, sharply falling living standards and serious political unrest.’
    • ‘‘Animals eat this stuff, but it's all I have to take home to them,’ she says, plunging her hands into the bag and pulling out bunches of grass and weed.’
    • ‘He plunges his hands under the faucet, splashing water over his face.’
    • ‘What this means is that journalists need to forewarn people of the dangers of certain words and actions that carry the potential of plunging their communities or the nation into chaos.’
    • ‘They also feed visually by capturing prey from the surface of mud or water, by plunging their heads into water, and by snatching insects from the air.’
    • ‘If you don't, you risk plunging yourself into the kind of doubt and uncertainty that only strenuous mental exertion can deal with and that's just the thing that busy people like yourself need to avoid.’
    thrust, stick, ram, drive, jab, stab, push, shove, force, sink
    View synonyms
    1. 2.1Put (something) in liquid so as to immerse it completely.
      ‘cover the cucumbers with boiling water and then plunge them into iced water’
      • ‘Pierce the skin at the other end, then plunge it into boiling water.’
      • ‘A handy tip is to plunge the small onions into boiling water for a minute before peeling them to make the job a lot easier.’
      • ‘If any plants are dry, plunge the whole pot in a bowl of water and wait until no more bubbles appear.’
      • ‘Although peeling isn't essential because this variety has a rather thin skin, it is an easy matter to plunge them into boiling water, drain and then slip off the skins.’
      • ‘The pastas are also freshly made, with fettuccine, angel hair and spinach ravioli all waiting to be plunged into boiling water at a guest's command.’
      • ‘Then the tissue is plunged into liquid nitrogen, at 190C below zero.’
      • ‘Shorn of their roots, the leaves can be plunged briefly into boiling water then either into a pan of hot butter and black pepper or shaken with some walnut or olive oil.’
      • ‘Using rubber gloves, put nettles in two litres of salted boiling water for a second to remove the sting then plunge them into iced water.’
      • ‘If using fresh tomatoes, plunge them into boiling water for 30 seconds, then pop in cold water, enabling you to peel the skins away.’
      • ‘They first dunk the tissue in a simple solution of ethylene glycol and buffered saline, and then chill the samples by plunging them into liquid nitrogen.’
      • ‘Immediately, while the glass is still hot, plunge it into cold water.’
      • ‘He slaps some sticky tape over the opening to seal it, takes a deep breath, then plunges it into a bowl of cold water.’
      • ‘Blanch the lettuces by plunging them into boiling water for 3 minutes (put the lid on the pan as soon as the lettuces go in, to help the water come back to the boil as quickly as possible).’
      • ‘After a few minutes, he lifted the piece of metal off the anvil with a pair of tongs and plunged it into a bucket of water near by.’
      • ‘It's tempting, when they are this fresh and crisp, to do nothing more than plunge them into boiling water, and serve them up in great piles, unadorned and tasting only of themselves.’
      • ‘Similarly, plunging food into boiling hot oil or water destroys vitamins.’
      • ‘To cook the quail's eggs, drop the eggs into boiling water for three and a half minutes and then plunge them into iced water to halt the cooking process.’
    2. 2.2Suddenly bring into a specified condition or state.
      ‘for a moment the scene was illuminated, then it was plunged back into darkness’
      • ‘My eyelids didn't want to stay open, and I shluffed the note off to my bedside table and quickly turned off my light, plunging my room into blackness.’
      • ‘Passengers described the terror felt after the train smashed into a car at a level crossing in Berkshire and was plunged into sudden darkness.’
      • ‘The overhead lights suddenly switched off, plunging the café into the semi-darkness of the automatic nightlights.’
      • ‘The sudden turn of events plunged Taiwan into crisis.’
      • ‘She instinctively reached for it, but the river suddenly swept her over the edge of the waterfall, plunging her into a darkness, and then suddenly and sharply into wakefulness.’
      • ‘A sudden crisis plunges the family into doubt and despair.’
      • ‘In another place, an overloaded circuit breaker tripped, plunging a corridor into sudden darkness.’
      • ‘The ship was plunged into total darkness as the engines drained power from everything except themselves and life support.’
      • ‘Suddenly the room was plunged into darkness - his computer had finished shutting down.’
      • ‘Recently my mother gave me a book of her recipes where I found foods I've not had since I was a child - it suddenly plunged me back into childhood.’
      • ‘Quick-thinking organisers plunged the stage into darkness to protect the star's modesty.’
      • ‘Suddenly, all flashlights began flickering before going dead, plunging the girls into darkness.’
      • ‘The overhead light in the room suddenly switched off, plunging the room in darkness.’
      • ‘Suddenly, without any warning, the entire room was plunged into darkness, and I could no longer feel my girlfriend's hand.’
      • ‘The power cut, which plunged High Street into darkness, was caused by a fuse failure at a nearby sub station.’
      • ‘At 9 p.m., an electrical transformer blew up, plunging the neighborhood into darkness.’
      • ‘Then suddenly they were plunged into darkness once again.’
      • ‘The army positioned snipers on rooftops, witnesses said, and fired a tank shell at an electricity transformer, plunging the camp into darkness.’
      • ‘Those tough conditions plunged the company into an interim net loss compared to a small profit last year.’
      • ‘Earlier this year, yobs plunged the pathway into darkness by attacking lighting bollards.’
    3. 2.3Sink (a plant or a pot containing a plant) in the ground.
      • ‘I have potted up the surviving plants and then plunged the pots back into the windowboxes.’
      • ‘After Christmas, reverse the process and plunge the pot into the ground until the following year’

noun

  • 1An act of jumping or diving into water.

    ‘we went straight from the sauna to take a cold plunge’
    • ‘It misstepped making its getaway and performed a spectacular cartwheeling plunge into the water between our canoes.’
    • ‘The rough footpath passes dangerously close to the edge of some of these gorges, and a slip on the muddy trail could well mean a headlong plunge into the boiling waters below.’
    • ‘An optional after-dinner extra is a lounge in the sauna followed by a quick plunge in the icy water of the lake.’
    • ‘Windy, cool and empty, its vast spaces were as refreshing as a plunge into cold water.’
    • ‘As a Royal Navy diver he made perilous plunges to help clear sunken warships which were causing hazardous obstructions and in 1942 he suffered a burst right eardrum as a result.’
    • ‘At 6 o'clock, roused by the réveille, we scurry to the bath-room, take the prescribed cold plunge, and then dress.’
    • ‘I turned and watched as the Sea Maiden continued her downward plunge into darkness.’
    • ‘Before she could make the final plunge, though, she heard someone behind her.’
    jump, dive
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1A swift and drastic fall in value or amount.
      ‘the bank declared a 76% plunge in its profits’
      • ‘The central bank attributed the steady plunge of the gross national savings rate to a rapid fall of savings in the household sector.’
      • ‘It alleges they breached their duties and wants creditors to be compensated for the company's plunge in value before it finally collapsed in May last year.’
      • ‘Newcastle experienced a plunge from 141 to 113.’
      • ‘At the height of the rush to stock festive Christmas tables, German butchers have reported plunges of up to 90% in sales of beef and sausages, as poultry and horse meat prices have surged.’
      • ‘The news follows a major review by Glanbia of its operation following indications of a major plunge in sales from next month.’
      • ‘A hallmark of the newly christened recession has been a plunge in venture-capital spending.’
      • ‘Carp are still on the move on Doe Hey Reservoir despite the recent plunge in temperatures.’
      • ‘Not that he is jumping at joy at the recent plunge in our growth rate from 11% to near zero.’
      • ‘The high borrowings that led to plunges in the value of many trusts are now working to their advantage with the return of confidence to the stock market in recent months.’
      • ‘It is believed he was under the water for at least two minutes, causing him to take in a lot of water and making his temperature plunge.’
      • ‘The company fell into financial trouble as a result of the plunge in the Thai baht in mid-1997, which made its debt burden soar.’
      • ‘Of particular concern has been the plunge in the value of insurance companies on solvency worries.’
      • ‘Assets fell 3.4 percent in the third quarter, mostly due to a 17 percent plunge in the value of stock and mutual funds holdings.’
      • ‘He experienced the worst plunge into unpopularity of any President of the Fifth Republic in his first year of office.’
      • ‘Thus, IT firms were left with huge inventories and massive amounts of excess capacity, which triggered a plunge in IT-sector growth.’
      • ‘Given the plunge in the value of Wolfson after its profits warning, that looks like a courageous statement.’
      • ‘His comments followed a plunge in first half profits from €13.5 million to 7m before tax and exceptional items.’
      • ‘An overnight plunge in commodity prices sent the Australian dollar tumbling to a five month low and currency dealers believe there's more falls to come.’
      • ‘A sharp plunge in the dollar would dramatically reduce the value of these assets, reducing the wealth of foreign investors.’
      • ‘The point is that falling prices are simply not the cause of a plunge in profits and increase in the burden of debt.’

Phrases

  • take the plunge

    • informal Commit oneself to a course of action about which one is nervous.

      • ‘He also decided to take the plunge and set up his own business.’
      • ‘But before you take the plunge, make sure you're ready to commit for the long haul.’
      • ‘There was a lot of positive feed back on the course from all the participants with at least two taking the plunge to sell at markets as a result of the training.’
      • ‘When clients started asking if she offered the treatment, she decided to take the plunge and practise on a few nervous friends.’
      • ‘In Swindon, councillors waited to see which way neighbouring local education authorities were going to move on the issue before they took the plunge and made their decision last autumn.’
      • ‘For a number of years, Anne cooked at the restaurant in the heritage centre but last year took the plunge and opened her own restaurant and delicatessen.’
      • ‘He's been practising for five years and is finally taking the plunge and starting a course in Sheffield before beginning his circus act.’
      • ‘Years later Noreen took the plunge and opened her own business, designing and making wedding gowns and formal wear on her own from a one room premises.’
      • ‘I put it off two years in a row - because it would take too much time away from golf, or so I said - and then last spring I finally took the plunge.’
      • ‘I was skeptical at first but I eventually decided to take the plunge.’
      commit oneself, go for it, give it one's all, give it all one has, go all out
      jump in at the deep end, go for broke
      View synonyms

Origin

Late Middle English: from Old French plungier thrust down based on Latin plumbum lead, plummet.

Pronunciation:

plunge

/plənj/