Definition of plasticity in US English:

plasticity

noun

  • 1The quality of being easily shaped or molded.

    • ‘However, predictions of optimal plasticity assume no cost to plasticity and sufficient genetic variance.’
    • ‘Whether this is due to decreased plasticity in the auditory cortex or in the language areas of the cortex is not known.’
    • ‘We hope these papers will fuel continued interest in the puzzling patterns of thermal plasticity and guide future efforts to reveal their causes.’
    • ‘Thus, the brain shows considerable plasticity for development of language capacity in young children.’
    • ‘Selection experiments have even targeted the degree of phenotypic plasticity of particular traits.’
    • ‘This arrangement could enable increased plasticity in the evolution of transpositional variation in the vertebrate body plan.’
    • ‘Experiments that examine genetic variation and phenotypic plasticity in trees are often limited in replication or restricted to early seedling stages.’
    • ‘Morphological plasticity is common in clonal plants, particularly in spacers, those parts of clonal plants that interconnect ramets.’
    • ‘A certain degree of plasticity in physiological traits is ubiquitous among plants.’
    • ‘Guard cell plasticity or, more exactly, plasticity in transpiration is clearly physiological plasticity.’
    • ‘There is no experimental evidence so far that phenotypic plasticity allows plants to adapt cuticular permeance to changes in evaporative demand.’
    • ‘In this case, phenotypic plasticity and not genetic uniqueness confer disparate leaf morphology.’
    • ‘So for us this has demonstrated to us a degree of plasticity that we have never known before the brain capable of.’
    • ‘The degree of F-actin plasticity has remained one of the main unknowns of cell migration mechanics.’
    • ‘We will now summarize some of the work which suggests that, indeed, the spinal cord has some remarkable degree of plasticity.’
    • ‘Such a description should include reference to the particle size distribution of the soil, plasticity, colour, texture, and mineral composition.’
    • ‘The hydrodynamic effect makes more probable the induction of plasticity after calcium ions flow in.’
    • ‘His work spans the fields of auditory perception, cortical plasticity and disorders such as dyslexia and focal dystonia.’
    • ‘The plasticity of the auditory system is currently thought to be at its maximum below the age of 2 years.’
    • ‘This phenomenon may reflect plasticity of the central nervous system, which is well recognized during early development.’
    malleability, softness, pliancy, pliability, flexibility, suppleness, ductility
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1Biology The adaptability of an organism to changes in its environment or differences between its various habitats.
      • ‘Such dynamic conditions require plasticity in behavior as a means of tracking environmental change.’
      • ‘This plasticity allows an organism to adjust continually to changing daylength as the seasons of the year progress.’
      • ‘As distinct from Upogebia, callianassids display a high degree of behavioral plasticity.’
      • ‘Alliaria petiolata displays plasticity to varied habitat conditions including levels of shading.’
      • ‘This confers a high level of architectural plasticity on the grapevine, enabling it to respond to environmental conditions.’

Pronunciation

plasticity

/plaˈstisədē//plæˈstɪsədi/