Definition of plastic in English:

plastic

noun

  • 1A synthetic material made from a wide range of organic polymers such as polyethylene, PVC, nylon, etc., that can be molded into shape while soft and then set into a rigid or slightly elastic form.

    • ‘The case is made of light-gray plastic.’
    • ‘Do not put either glass or plastic in hot water; they may crack, especially if cold.’
    • ‘Protect your furniture and carpet by laying down plastic, then newspaper.’
    • ‘People were wearing dust masks and everything stank of burnt plastic.’
    • ‘Her house is a shack made of sticks, black plastic and a few sheets of tin.’
    • ‘There was a time when outdoor furniture was either teak, aluminum, or plastic.’
    • ‘We had curbside recycling for paper, plastic, glass and tin cans.’
    • ‘One woman carried a picture frame encased in transparent plastic.’
    • ‘The Dublin company is one of Europe's leading producers of clear sheet plastic, with a 30 per cent share in that market.’
    • ‘Water bottles have expiration dates, not because the water goes bad, but because the plastic which stores the water affects the taste.’
    • ‘A bill to deal with beverage containers would discourage the use of plastic by imposing a levy on manufacturers who use plastic bottles, and would encourage the return and recycling of bottles.’
    • ‘Most plastics, varnishes and packaging foams are made from chemicals derived from petroleum.’
    1. 1.1informal Credit cards or other types of plastic card that can be used as money.
      ‘he pays with cash instead of with plastic’
      • ‘The number of credit and store cards has doubled to 74 million, which means that every adult holds two pieces of credit plastic in his or her wallet.’
      • ‘I wouldn't like to have a cheque book or plastic.’
      • ‘These cards are ideal for users of plastic who always pay off their account each month.’
      • ‘If your new plastic is a ‘% only on balance transfers’ card, you won't be going shopping with it.’
      • ‘Did you know that if you laid all of Britain's credit and debt cards end-to-end, the line of plastic would stretch from London to Bangkok?’
      • ‘Instead, I poke my piece of plastic into a slot and get my money.’
      • ‘Some feared that the charges would erode the card's upscale position as the premium-priced plastic.’
      • ‘Anxious to be a-doing, I hied myself to an Office Depot in the South of Market district and laid down some plastic for a Palm Vx.’
      • ‘So, you'd be barking mad to use any plastic abroad, other than a Nationwide BS or SAGA card.’
      • ‘Swapping your expensive plastic for a credit card that charges no interest on balance transfers and purchases for up to nine months.’
      • ‘Check out the fantastic plastic in our Credit Card centre.’
      • ‘At the same time, AmEx will step up its drive to wean large companies and small businesses from checks to corporate plastic.’
      • ‘They buy chips in dollars with credit cards and have their winnings refunded back to the plastic.’
      • ‘She lives within a strict budget, and the only plastic in her wallet is a debit card.’
      • ‘Check out our Credit Card centre for your perfect plastic.’
      • ‘If you've got money in the bank then using plastic shouldn't be a problem.’
      • ‘Hence, with so much plastic in circulation, Britain needs to treat its credit cards with respect.’
      • ‘Each plastic card resembles a credit card, but is in fact a completely self contained microcomputer with its own embedded software and memory.’
      • ‘Getting them to embrace plastic may be an impossible feat.’
      • ‘However, in the meantime, play safe: take as much care with your loyalty cards as you do with your cash and other plastic.’
      credit card, debit card, cash card, swipe card
      View synonyms

adjective

  • 1Made of plastic.

    ‘plastic bottles’
    • ‘Pour into small moulds or a single bowl, cover with plastic film then place in the refrigerator to set.’
    • ‘The rockets are plastic toys suspended from strings.’
    • ‘Each tissue sample was excised using a biopsy forceps and placed within the small plastic container.’
    • ‘These buckets are of a plastic material and hold about four gallons of perlite.’
    • ‘If you're using plastic pots the soil can become quite warm.’
    • ‘He unhooked his arm and grabbed a plastic cup from the bag on the counter.’
    • ‘This means that all newspapers, cardboard and plastic drinks bottles can now be easily disposed of, instead of having these items dumped in landfill sites.’
    • ‘I should at least get marks for effort: I have gone to coffee mornings, decorated boxes with gold paint and plastic jewels and operated the tea-urn at a tabletop sale.’
    • ‘An impressive 53 percent of plastic soda bottles were recycled in 1994, but only 35.6 percent in 1998.’
    • ‘Large plastic containers are used during the first day or two of brewing home made beer.’
    • ‘This eye-catching, bright orange plastic bottle sports a jazzy front label that insists only natural flavours are used, no artificial sweeteners are added, and the drink is fortified with vitamins and calcium.’
    • ‘The particles could be incorporated into a wide range of products, as well as socks, including other clothing, shoes, food containers and other plastic products.’
    • ‘The animals are placed in plastic dish tubs and, using a mixture of warm water and a dab of mild soap, rescue workers scrub the birds' feathers.’
    • ‘Remember when you'd go to the beach with your little plastic bucket and shovel?’
    • ‘Like most sparkling water in plastic bottles, it can overflow when you remove the cap.’
    • ‘As distributors of paperboard cartons work to reinvigorate their packages, plastic milk bottles continue to grow in influence.’
    • ‘It was a yellow plastic banana board with orange wheels.’
    • ‘Wrap each sandwich in heavy plastic wrap and freeze individually.’
    • ‘This is when he graciously grants himself permission to empty a shopping bag full of cheap plastic sunglasses onto the table in front of me.’
    • ‘Often customers will reuse plastic containers long after their contents are gone, especially when it still looks good.’
    1. 1.1 Looking or tasting artificial.
      ‘long-distance flights with their plastic food’
      ‘she smiled a little plastic smile’
      • ‘After she broke down in the dressing room, all she could try to do was fake a plastic smile and pray that it will be over soon.’
      • ‘Her eyes did not linger long on them, she felt as if they were superficial, fake, plastic.’
      • ‘She gave me a totally plastic smile and waved her hand at me.’
      • ‘A study conducted a few years ago with Downs Syndrome children called for some of them to be trained to smile, even if it was just a plastic smile.’
      • ‘It's refreshing to see that there is so much creativity in this plastic world we're in.’
      • ‘I flashed a sweet plastic smile and turned away, trying to walk on unsteady feet towards the door leading to the elevator banks.’
      • ‘I could feel her trying to fight back the tears and sadness she had felt all these years, hidden behind a plastic smile put on so she wouldn't upset Dad.’
      • ‘She looks up at me with a plastic smile, almost challenging me to argue with her.’
      • ‘Every time I fly into New Zealand I get a lump in my throat, but I'm always convinced it's the plastic airline food.’
      • ‘For a boy who has appeared fatigued and cynical in the last few months it was an incredible performance - funny, charismatic and sung in a voice that is rare in these days of phoney plastic bands.’
      • ‘Giving him a plastic smile, Lenore headed towards the stables.’
      • ‘I know that you've seen his plastic smile on a thousand eager faces before.’
      • ‘They both stopped and flashed plastic smiles when the harried young man made eye contact with them.’
      • ‘‘Everything about him was right,’ she bleats, apparently failing to notice that he had a fake plastic face.’
      • ‘She looks at me and puts on a plastic smile. ‘Sir, it will take about ten minutes if you don't mind waiting.’’
      • ‘There will be no air hostesses to flash their plastic smiles!’
      • ‘From time to time I still dig out my Elvis ring or wear my Charlie Brown necklace to relive the nostalgia - it always makes me smile to see the plastic shiny silliness of it all.’
      • ‘She smiled at her with a cold, plastic smile.’
      • ‘Next week, our fake plastic love for Radiohead.’
      • ‘Mom smiled politely with a plastic giggle here and there.’
      artificial, false, synthetic, fake, superficial, pseudo, sham, bogus, ersatz, assumed, spurious, specious, unnatural, insincere
      View synonyms
  • 2(of substances or materials) easily shaped or molded.

    ‘rendering the material more plastic’
    • ‘To a significant extent the siltstone has been transformed into a plastic material, particularly near shear zones.’
    • ‘Wet into wet, and the use of salt or alcohol in wet paint suggested the plastic foam material from which the noodles are made.’
    • ‘New materials have come from the chemical industry and from the molecular engineering of new plastic substances.’
    • ‘At this point, they are still moving around pretty fast, so they are bounced around in a nearby plastic material.’
    • ‘This is a thin film that's been coated onto a flexible plastic material backed by a strong glue.’
    • ‘Meanwhile, polymer scientists are doing fundamental research, seeking ever more conductive plastic materials.’
    • ‘These products have little or no effect on the plastic or hardened properties of concrete.’
    • ‘They are working on making the cells into a flexible plastic material.’
    • ‘The process to make the cap includes positioning viscous plastic material in a mold to produce the desired retention member shape.’
    malleable, mouldable, shapable, pliable, pliant, ductile, flexible, soft, workable, supple, bendable
    View synonyms
    1. 2.1 (in art) relating to molding or modeling in three dimensions, or producing three-dimensional effects.
      • ‘The topic was also addressed for several day through works of plastic art and performances.’
      • ‘You can't make art - literary or plastic - without taking on the matter of form.’
      • ‘What others had done for poetic art, this he did for plastic art.’
      • ‘Four principal types of source pertain to the subject: literature, works of graphic or plastic art, archaeological remains, and notated pieces of music.’
      • ‘To the ancient Greeks, the body was an object of esthetic contemplation, raised by their plastic art to the loftiest peaks of sublimity.’
      • ‘Study of his comments on plastic dynamism confirm this reading.’
      • ‘‘We will be looking at using the Pickering plant for plastic moulding work not related to the car industry,’ he said.’
    2. 2.2 (in science and technology) relating to the permanent deformation of a solid without fracture by the temporary application of force.
      • ‘Normally, such plastic deformations result in developing smooth or gently wrinkled boundary surfaces.’
      • ‘Heat is also released by plastic deformation associated with jetting and ripple formation at the interface between the parts being welded.’
      • ‘Any attempt to do so results in greater deformation of the rolls, without any plastic deformation of the strip.’
      • ‘It should also be added that the fine precipitate particles can act as dislocation multiplication centers during plastic deformation.’
      • ‘Ruptures originating at plastic deformations of loaded sand bed formed stretch marks with sand penetrating through them to the clay.’
      • ‘AFM data, described below, also did not show any obvious plastic deformation after repeated indentation.’
      • ‘Yielding occurs from point A to point B and this is the area of plastic deformation.’
      • ‘There was asphalt cracking due to tensile strain resulting from plastic deformation within the crushed rock.’
      • ‘The stress at which plastic deformation or yielding is observed to begin depends on the sensitivity of the strain measurements.’
      • ‘The NDT is the temperature at which fracture initiates with essentially no prior plastic deformation.’
      • ‘He postulated that the energy due to plastic deformation must be added to the surface energy associated with the creation of new crack surfaces.’
      • ‘Increases in axle loads and tyre pressures are creating plastic strain in some crushed rocks with sprayed seal and thin asphalt surfacings.’
      • ‘Similar dynamics is observed in the plastic deformation of solids, in particular glasses.’
      • ‘Little or no plastic deformation is seen in tracheid walls in ring 26, which is the last ring formed in the tree.’
      • ‘In crystalline solids, plastic deformation tends to be confined to crystallographic planes of atoms which have a low resistance to shear.’
      • ‘Therefore, micropipette aspiration deforms the cell with a mixture of elastic and plastic deformations.’
      • ‘Thus rigid pipes are less sensitive to crushing and more sensitive to plastic deformation and buckling than their flexible equivalents.’
      • ‘A significant amount of the total plastic deformation therefore occurs in the microcracks grow and link up in the final stages of fracture.’
      • ‘This limits local concentrations of plastic deformation and suppresses fatigue damage.’
      • ‘The main component of this deformation is the plastic strain of cell walls.’
    3. 2.3 Offering scope for creativity.
      ‘the writer is drawn to words as a plastic medium’
      • ‘Lithic technology is generally viewed as a less plastic medium for the expression of style.’
      • ‘Such activities were not only affirming but also emotively comforting to the client in ways that more plastic mediums have not been.’
      • ‘Like reading, writing was a plastic medium which filled various needs and purposes.’
    4. 2.4Biology Exhibiting adaptability to change or variety in the environment.
      • ‘Similarly many behavioral traits are plastic across environments.’
      • ‘Instead, the brain is plastic, and our quota of happiness can be enhanced through mental training.’
      • ‘Do plastic traits affect reproductive fitness, suggesting that they may be under natural selection depending on environmental conditions experienced by the plants?’
      • ‘Every system which would escape the fate of an organism too rigid to adjust itself to its environment, must be plastic to the extent that the growth of knowledge demands.’
      • ‘Genotypic selection was measured on plastic traits in each environment to test whether the observed direction of plasticity was adaptive.’

Origin

Mid 17th century (in the sense characteristic of molding): from French plastique or Latin plasticus, from Greek plastikos, from plassein to mold.

Pronunciation:

plastic

/ˈplastik/