Definition of place in English:

place

noun

  • 1A particular position or point in space.

    ‘there were still some remote places in the world’
    ‘the monastery was a peaceful place’
    ‘that street was no place for a lady’
    • ‘We usually name public places and spaces after the big shots or big donors.’
    • ‘Residents say the area was once a peaceful place to live, but has been ruined by unruly youths.’
    • ‘Most nodded approvingly, for this region has a big place in the hearts of many Azeris.’
    • ‘The paradigm of the open space as a public place must be promoted better across the country.’
    • ‘It's difficult to believe that such a peaceful place was the site of a massacre.’
    • ‘The Alice, one of the most remote places in the world, ought to have some kind of response to globalisation.’
    • ‘While working full-time at the BBC, I spent about four years flying to quite faraway places to film on location.’
    • ‘Well, I suppose it isn't one of the most remote places on Earth for nothing.’
    • ‘It's also at the centre of our metropolitan areas, the main streets, these great places that we once had in every town.’
    • ‘Big cities are intimidating places even when you speak the language and know where you're going.’
    • ‘When I found out that 25,000 people lived there it just sounded like the biggest place in the world.’
    • ‘As a result, Taiaroa Head is the only place in the world where albatrosses nest on a mainland.’
    • ‘This is the way in which his narrative speaks to actual locations and places discovered.’
    • ‘Peace is wonderful and we should have more of it, but some of the most peaceful places on earth are cemeteries.’
    • ‘Such a pessimistic view of a place once described as a paradise is unacceptable.’
    • ‘One of the most peaceful places on earth is actually 15 metres underwater on the Great Barrier Reef.’
    • ‘Aberdeen, as a city and as a club, still have a big place in my heart.’
    • ‘We became aware of the places between populated areas, aware of the spectrum of space.’
    • ‘Training mostly occurs in remote places, in harsh climates and in environments that test the resolve of newcomers.’
    • ‘The lane of Meimeili near the road was the place accommodating most comfort houses in this area.’
    location, site, spot, scene, setting, position, point, situation, area, region, whereabouts, locale
    town, city, village, hamlet
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1 A particular point on a larger surface or in a larger object or area.
      ‘he lashed out and cut the policeman's hand in three places’
      • ‘Even now, although this land is being developed in places in the village, there are still vast areas left undeveloped.’
      • ‘My jaw was broken in two places, and more than 16 pins were needed to wire my jaw in place.’
      • ‘The fields are trying to dry - though there is still a lot of moisture in places.’
      • ‘He was never going to be happy on a surface that resembled a bog in places but he was the second Irish finisher in the junior event.’
      • ‘Attention to road surfaces and footpaths is also required in places.’
      • ‘The map of the city is frayed in places, and the box shipper should be at the worn blue door shortly.’
      • ‘The course is tough, it is rough in places, it is challenging.’
      • ‘I also remember the last time I painted I used my hands in places.’
      • ‘The surface had failed in places, and this had allowed grass and weeds to come through.’
      • ‘Fringed in places by swaying palm trees, this usually quiet beach is an ideal spot to take in those last minute rays and a cooling dip.’
      • ‘The writing itself is not flashy, nor is it overly inventive; actually it's quite plain in places.’
      • ‘There was a good level of litter control the judges commented although some litter was noted along the roadway in places.’
      • ‘It's serious and supposedly scary in places, but it's just so incredibly over-the-top that it loses all impact for me.’
      • ‘A lot of heavy lorries use this road, and the surface is terrible in places.’
      • ‘The weather in Yorkshire was restricted to widespread rain which was heavy in places but there were no reports of the flash floods seen on Sunday.’
      • ‘A huge thing, the wreck was 380 ft long with a beam of 75, and in places comes within a metre or two of the surface.’
    2. 1.2 A building or area used for a specified purpose or activity.
      ‘the town has many excellent eating places’
      • ‘They applied for Planning permission to use the building as a place of worship and I went to the public meeting.’
      • ‘It was the centre of business activities and a meeting place for all religions.’
      • ‘Not only does it serve as a focal point for the community and a place of worship, it also helps keep the local economy moving.’
      • ‘Tourists look for good places to sleep and excellent places to eat.’
      • ‘That means you need to construct places for them to eat, sleep, have fun and spend their money.’
      • ‘They go to the Scarlet Bar, because of course it is the only place to eat lunch in Erinsborough.’
      • ‘Glasgow's reinvention is no more apparent than in the West End, which now has a string of very decent places to eat and trendy pubs.’
      • ‘The mayor granted the permit on the condition that the building did not serve as a place of worship.’
      • ‘There are huge pedestrian walk ways and squares with theatres, museums and places to eat and drink.’
      • ‘On the way to the apartment Chris pointed out some good restaurants and places to eat.’
      • ‘It is also the location of many business places including food outlets.’
      • ‘What we have now is a splendid modern building, a place of worship and a resource centre for the whole community.’
      • ‘Some, such as Dona Ines, Restaurant Al Fonte and Pedros, are decidedly decent places to eat.’
      • ‘Community centers, museums, and places of worship also might be used for this purpose.’
      • ‘As soon as there is a demand for 50 or more child care places in a location, it plans to open a centre there.’
      • ‘Chaining communities to their places of ritual and worship does not create secular institutions.’
      • ‘Internet users all over the world will soon be able to go on a virtual tour of Heckmondwike, visiting shops, restaurants and places to stay.’
      • ‘Can our motorway service stations become stylish places to eat?’
      • ‘On the whole then, restaurants are great places to eat in, but perhaps not that good as an investment.’
      • ‘The Romans used their gardens very much as we do today, as a place for family activities.’
    3. 1.3informal A person's home.
      ‘what about dinner at my place?’
      • ‘Now he is staying with friends, until his place is habitable once again.’
      • ‘I spent a lot of time hanging out at their place and the books were always out in the open.’
      • ‘I stayed over at his place last night after watching an episode of Buffy.’
      • ‘After awhile we headed back to my place, where we watched some Family Guy until she had to go.’
      • ‘We finished our meal with a bottle of wine and went back to his place to watch anime dvds.’
      • ‘I'm still nursing my head after a heavy night at my place with dinner guests.’
      • ‘It turned out the man had several places in the big city, which surprised her quite a bit.’
      home, house, flat, apartment, a roof over one's head
      View synonyms
    4. 1.4 A point in a book or other text reached by a reader at a particular time.
      ‘I must have lost my place in the script’
      • ‘It's a great way to make your point but I was at a really good spot in my book and the shoes just made me lose my place.’
  • 2A portion of space available or designated for or being used by someone.

    ‘they hurried to their places at the table’
    ‘he was watching from his place across the room’
    • ‘The oarsmen were already seated at their places and were laughing and joking as they prepared to set to the oars.’
    • ‘Grandfather was already in his place and Anna slid into the chair next to his.’
    • ‘As the fans took their places in the designated embankments and stands, the anticipation grew.’
    • ‘Just visit the pier any weekend, summer or winter, and you'll see the dive-school vans parked in their regular places.’
    • ‘As you couldn't reserve the table, it was up to you to arrive early for dinner to secure your place.’
    • ‘Residents had to reserve places at dinner for themselves and their guests; missed meals would be charged to their accounts.’
    • ‘He had saved a place for him in the middle of the table and was guarding it diligently.’
    • ‘So they said they would tell me when a place became available for me to sit until a table became available.’
    • ‘I had to work, but my daughter went in my place and had dinner with the band.’
    • ‘Forty places for cars are available in the underground car park under the supermarket.’
    • ‘They took their places in the studio, but as the show unfolded the running order started to change.’
    • ‘Visitors need to book places at the cookery demonstrations.’
    • ‘There are house banners hanging from the ceiling over the designated places to sit.’
    seat, chair, position, space
    View synonyms
    1. 2.1 A vacancy or available position.
      ‘she won a place to study German at the university’
      • ‘This is because there is nowhere else for them to go, thanks to a severe shortage of places in care homes.’
      • ‘She has been offered a place to study politics and modern history at Oxford.’
      • ‘She has been offered a place by Education Bradford at Rhodesway but says her daughter has no friends there.’
      • ‘Since 1997 they have also been allowed to offer similar places to eligible Australian students.’
      • ‘It seems sad that men who have done such great work abroad are returning with no-one back home to fill their places.’
      • ‘Many of our parents are also fearful about the existing masts and some have already applied for places at other schools in the area.’
      • ‘Seven sixth form students from Bootham School in York have been offered places to study at Cambridge or Oxford universities.’
      • ‘The children have been offered places at Sandal Primary in Baildon, or schools in Shipley, Menston and Guiseley.’
      • ‘He has been offered places in assisted care homes in Boston Spa and Wakefield, but wants to stay near his family in York.’
      • ‘Students lucky enough to win one of the few places available here, feel sure they can make a living out of their work.’
      • ‘Around the time of my diagnosis I had also been offered a place to study for an MPhil in philosophy.’
      • ‘Do universities need to do more to make sure that students who are rejected know why they have not been offered a place?’
      • ‘That child has been placed on the waiting list and will be offered a place as soon as one becomes available.’
      • ‘There is now a shortage of care home places throughout the country.’
      • ‘City of York Council says it has lost 119 places in nursing and residential homes after closures in the past year.’
      • ‘This in turn frees up the health services and places in residential care.’
      • ‘In England, undergraduate places have already been increased to help raise the number of new doctors.’
      • ‘The facility has got off to a flying start with most of the places already filled.’
      • ‘The growing shortage of care home places in the Forest means local pensioners who need long-term care often have to leave the area.’
      • ‘In the long-term, a significant increase in places at dental schools is also expected to try to plug a severe shortage of dentists.’
      job, day job, position, post, appointment, situation, office
      View synonyms
    2. 2.2 The regular or proper position of something.
      ‘lay each slab in place’
      • ‘The French landscape artists of the mid-century are also accorded their proper place here.’
      • ‘Holding it, she felt a sense of rightness, of things settling into their proper places.’
      • ‘The cold, round meal tray is impassively in front, with two bowls and two pairs of chopsticks placed in their proper places.’
      • ‘We really do not have a proper place to keep them, as anyone can plainly see in the photo.’
      • ‘Normal service is now resumed, and all the images should be repointing to the proper place.’
      • ‘In the end everything is neatly resolved and people are put in their proper place.’
      • ‘Even if such indicators are present, they are not placed at the proper places.’
      • ‘Mark Gosche slips nineteen places from his 2002 ranking, reflecting his lack of profile.’
      • ‘Another great consequence of this process is that we begin again to discover our proper place in the universe.’
      • ‘In particular, he wishes to restore the history of Irish womanhood to its proper place.’
      • ‘I place my stuff onto the bed and put the items back to their proper places.’
      • ‘She grabbed her weapons and gently placed them in the proper places around her black outfit.’
      • ‘In comes a calm, regionally balanced economy with the housing market in its proper place.’
      • ‘He placed the pendulum and ring back in their proper place and turned around to leave the room.’
    3. 2.3 A person's rank or status.
      ‘occupation structures a person's place in society’
      • ‘How did the cat regain its rightful place in society?’
      • ‘They have a place in this society, and mad leadership is not a thing that should prevail.’
      • ‘If you receive more cards than you send, your place in society is assured.’
      • ‘It didn't matter that he had been insulted; as a Lowly, he had to learn to accept his place.’
      • ‘To deny its rightful place in our society is to deny our past and to limit our future.’
      • ‘Do we simply accept our place at the back of the queue for funding, bracing ourselves for leaner times?’
      • ‘His obsession with place and status had brought his career to an ironic and tragic end.’
      • ‘We allow it to consume us until it is not our place in the world that matters so much as how the outside world fits into what we think we have.’
      • ‘To retain its influential place in Polish society, the church has to decide which way its future lies.’
      • ‘Addicts need to be shown that they have a place in society; that they have something to live for.’
      • ‘It does not matter where their place is in society as long as we give them an incentive to better themselves.’
      • ‘As teenagers continue to mature they begin to seek out their places in society.’
      • ‘As an artist you will surely agree that it is the job of art continually to scrutinise and interrogate society and our place in it.’
      • ‘Know your place, and accept that you're going to remain there for the rest of your life.’
      • ‘Any political action stepping outside their traditional place in society risked a backlash.’
      • ‘People go to jail these days, and when they come out they blithely resume their place in society.’
      • ‘There's a mountain of work to be done if they are to get back their rightful place in senior ranks.’
      status, position, station, standing, grade, rank, footing, niche
      View synonyms
    4. 2.4[usually with negative] A right or privilege resulting from someone's role or position.
      ‘I'm sure she has a story to tell, but it's not my place to ask’
      • ‘But he said it was not his place to direct blame at a sole individual or establishment.’
      • ‘It was not my place to voice my opinion.’
      • ‘It's not my place to say anything, I suppose, because I derolled her a long while back.’
      • ‘It was not my place to scorn myths, when some people thought they were nothing but stories told to children late at night.’
      • ‘I'm not going to go into any more details as it's not my place to discuss her personal life.’
      • ‘That guy had a massive impact on me and it was a huge reminder that it is not my place to judge the lives of others.’
      • ‘He said it was not his place to defend his role, but that he had represented the family to the best of his ability.’
      • ‘He was reluctant to become involved in the issue, stating it was not his place to comment.’
      • ‘I will not judge any of them for it is not my place to judge the sins and virtues of my fellow man.’
      • ‘He himself has kept his counsel this week, insisting that it is not his place to defend himself.’
      • ‘If you are a non-smoker it is not your place to tell others what they can and cannot do in a public place.’
      • ‘How could she even dare to become part of the very play itself when it was not her place?’
      • ‘It's not my place to speak on behalf of the RSA so you'll just have to wait for the full story.’
      • ‘It's not my place to give advice on how artists should set themselves up.’
      • ‘It was not my place to make any statements about the status of it - it is not my band.’
      • ‘A lot of people say I should take them off like my guests but it's not my place to do that.’
      • ‘I don't know what to do, it's not my place to tell about you know what, but they expect me to.’
      • ‘Obviously, the answer does not satisfy the member, but that is not my place as Speaker.’
      responsibility, duty, job, task, role, function, part, concern, affair, mission, charge
      View synonyms
    5. 2.5 The role played by or importance attached to someone or something in a particular context.
      ‘the place of computers in improving office efficiency varies between companies’
      • ‘I am sure that the book will find a place as a text in schools and at an introductory level in universities.’
      • ‘I believe that there is indeed an important place for the type of care that general physicians provide.’
      • ‘Scrutiny by English Heritage experts is ensuring the listed building retains its place in history.’
      • ‘Does the independent press have an important place in literary life or is it little more than vanity publishing?’
      • ‘But if you obey and teach others its commands, you will have an important place in the kingdom.’
      • ‘Despite the fact that she was childless, she held an important place on the island.’
      • ‘All three have their important place in the law of torts, but the liability attached to them will differ.’
      • ‘Bulgaria will have an important place to play in any book that he writes about this.’
      • ‘This is a remarkable work which gives him an important place in the history of probability.’
      • ‘I think flood irrigation is going to have an important place here for a long time.’
      • ‘The instruments soon gained a regular place in the orchestra as well as the military band.’
  • 3A position in a sequence, in particular.

    • ‘At the time, his side was ranked seven places and twelve-and-a-half points above the home team.’
    • ‘The British number eight showed all his Yorkshire grit to beat a player ranked more than 200 places above him in the world.’
    • ‘Apparently, these interruptions do not tend to occur at particular places in the sequence.’
    • ‘If a driver changes his engine, he'll be moved back 10 places in the starting order.’
    • ‘The Peugeot drivers drove conservatively in order to maintain their places, finishing fifth and sixth on both stages.’
    • ‘In Europe Ulster is still ranked 13 places ahead of Glasgow so the match promises to be a close one.’
    • ‘Her opponent was ranked 16 places above her.’
    • ‘They're the third group out, and their place in the running order reflects their chances.’
    • ‘Yet the site has risen by 10,000 places and is now ranked at 30,000 over the last 3 months.’
    • ‘Inevitably, the victory earned him the order of merit title, swapping places with Bradley who had captured it last year.’
    • ‘He used the image of a guest at a banquet who chooses the lowest place in order to be seen being elevated to a higher one.’
    • ‘The weight of an athlete's first lift determines their place in the starting order.’
    • ‘He dropped more than 50 Order of Merit places to 74th and managed only one top-ten finish.’
    • ‘Despite being ranked more than 850 places below his opponent, he is settling well and holds serve to 15.’
    • ‘He may be occupying a place lower in the pecking order, but they started with far more purpose.’
    • ‘In Mexico this month, although seeded two, she lost to Carla who is ranked ten places below her.’
    • ‘He is now a senior whip and is ranked seven places above the finance spokesperson.’
    1. 3.1 A position in a contest.
      ‘his score was good enough to leave him in ninth place’
      • ‘Defeat did little for Reds' hopes of snatching the fifth and final play-off place.’
      • ‘It was a victory that meant the difference between sixth and ninth place on the ladder.’
      • ‘He took them to ninth place in the league and is aiming to emulate that at Park View Road.’
      • ‘Leicester move into fourth place but still have a lot of work to do to seal their place in the championship play-offs.’
      • ‘With two games to go Spurs were seventh but at 5pm today we found ourselves out in the cold in ninth place.’
      • ‘The club is in a healthy tenth place in the table and is certainly good enough to make a late season push into sixth or seventh place.’
      • ‘Artful Jenny stayed on strongly to book her place in the final a further five lengths behind.’
      • ‘They will now meet either Japan or Australia to play for fifth and sixth place.’
      • ‘Many more displays like this and they could both be in line for places in England's World Cup squad.’
      • ‘She followed her home in eighth place and Liz was ninth.’
      • ‘Asian contenders included Singapore in seventh place and Hong Kong in ninth place.’
      • ‘In 1963 The Beatles occupied the first five places in the US singles charts.’
      • ‘With the first six places all occupied by Kenyan athletes, they won the team title for a third consecutive year.’
      • ‘That helps lift an entire club and the fact they are all battling for places for those big games will help.’
      • ‘After a handful of laps the car was up to 2nd place and was already challenging for the lead.’
      • ‘But he was over the moon to learn he has been awarded one of the prized places in the Big Apple's largest event.’
      • ‘The Royals have only won two league fixtures since the turn of the year and are in real danger of slipping out of the play off places.’
      • ‘The goal for everyone is to get into the Premiership and I expect the play-off places to be very tightly contested.’
      • ‘If he continues to perform like he did on Saturday, a World Cup place will be a strong possibility.’
      • ‘If the top teams monopolise these tournaments then seventh place may yet be enough for a ticket into Europe.’
    2. 3.2North American The second position, especially in a horse race.
      • ‘He comes in after a monster effort last time out that only ended in a place showing.’
    3. 3.3British Any of the first three or sometimes four positions in a race (used especially of the second, third, or fourth positions)
      • ‘His finishes include tied for second, tied for sixth, tied for third and a second place in 2001.’
      • ‘He made a good start to the season with four second places in the Peter Craven Memorial meeting at Kirkmanshulme Lane last Monday.’
      • ‘Both swimmers recorded good times, with Louis taking another second place and Sam third.’
      • ‘Not only did Max lose his third place, he even jeopardized his participation in the second race.’
      • ‘However, the battle for the third and fourth places is very close.’
      • ‘Pole position and a second place in the race made a great weekend for him and for the whole team.’
      • ‘He had a good trip to Solihull, having a first place and champion at the Heritage besides second, third and fourth places.’
      • ‘Brian has raced around the UK and Europe for many years and won more than 50 races with 35 second places.’
      • ‘He beats them into second and third places.’
      • ‘For all these reasons the second, third and fourth places could make interesting reading.’
      • ‘The only competition in the Scottish game these days involves the one-legged race for third place.’
      • ‘He brought the car in on lap 90 for fuel and resumed his race in third place.’
      • ‘He has an impressive National record, with two second places, a third and a fourth but has yet to capture the big prize itself.’
      • ‘In qualifying we clinched the pole position, and in the race, second and third places.’
      • ‘How we roared, jumping in anticipation of a well earned place at the finish.’
      • ‘Kim Young was in second place after the third round but finished the final fourth round at four over par.’
      • ‘The Team Eurotech Porsche finished the race in third place.’
      • ‘He wasn't actually hunting the lead, as a second place at the end of the race would have been fantastic for him.’
      • ‘Nonetheless, with two wins and two second places in his last four tournaments, he remains favourite to capture the money title.’
      • ‘He had a first and two second places at Mallory Park, a third and fourth at Cadwell Park and second, third and fourth at Snetterton.’
    4. 3.4 The degree of priority given to something.
      ‘accurate reportage takes second place to lurid detail’
      • ‘Beauty and history usually takes second place to money and progress (if you want to call it that).’
    5. 3.5 The position of a figure in a series indicated in decimal or similar notation, especially one after the decimal point.
      ‘calculate the ratios to one decimal place’
      • ‘In their rush to smile for the cameras, someone apparently bumped a decimal point six places to the right.’
      • ‘Our future discoveries must be looked for in the sixth place of decimals.’
      • ‘It's being asked because the figures are miniscule, going from two to four places of decimals.’
      • ‘Convert the decimal to a percentage by moving the decimal point two places to the right.’
  • 4(in place names) a square or a short street.

    ‘our new restaurant is in Hilliard Place’
    • ‘He arrived in Britain from Jamaica in 1997 and later settled in Kimberley Place, Harehills, Leeds.’
    • ‘Take place every Tuesday night in the Community Services Centre, Stanhope Place at 8pm.’
    • ‘The Second World War Experience Centre has moved from York Place in Leeds to Feast Field, off Town Street in Horsforth, Leeds.’
    • ‘Thieves had forced the door on his unit in Birkett's Place, More-cambe, and fled with the expensive tools.’
    • ‘Nowadays, he also has a city centre home on Ely Place, just off St Stephen's Green in Dublin.’
    • ‘Have you ever seen the snapshot of Christie at 10 Rillington Place?’
    • ‘In a cul-de-sac in Howth village, 5 St Mary's Place is a refurbished double-fronted period home with a smart interior.’
    • ‘Located at 15 Westland Place, Fifteen is just a short walk from Old Street Tube station.’
    • ‘Bourque and other Dunsany Place residents remain unconvinced their calls for help were answered as efficiently as possible.’
    • ‘Welcome home to Tony, Dominic Place, who is home after a spell in Waterford Regional Hospital.’
    • ‘She, who lives at Clashrea Place, is daughter of Jack and Teresa from the Lacken Road.’
    • ‘The first phase would involve Duncombe Place, Walmgate, Lendal, Blake Street and Stonebow.’
    • ‘After six years it has moved from Tower Street to a new home at Brackenhill, in St George's Place, close to York Racecourse.’
    • ‘A memorial was erected to her in St Martin's Place, off Trafalgar Square, London.’
    • ‘I have slept in a shed behind St. Bridget's Place a few times, and behind the priest's house.’
    • ‘On the west pavement at 7 Croall Place is Borland's Darts and Television Emporium.’
    • ‘We parked in the car park opposite York Theatre Royal in St Leonard's Place.’
    • ‘A Requiem Mass will be said at St Wilfrid's Roman Catholic Church, Duncombe Place, York, at noon on Saturday.’
    • ‘One such scene is captured near York Minster, in Duncombe Place.’
    • ‘Welcome home to Maura, Griffith Place, who is home after a recent stay in Waterford Regional Hospital.’
    • ‘St Catherine's Place in Kirkwall was closed for a time yesterday morning after a property was seriously damaged by last night's strong winds.’
    1. 4.1 A country house with its grounds.
      • ‘Foots Cray Place was the home of the one-time Chancellor of the Exchequer, Nicholas Vansittart, Lord Bexley.’
      • ‘Grove Place was the home of John de la Grave in 1296.’

verb

[WITH OBJECT]
  • 1Put in a particular position.

    ‘a newspaper had been placed beside my plate’
    • ‘Instead, it will be placed in an upright position next to the speaker.’
    • ‘The trap was then placed gently on the floor between the fridge and the stove.’
    • ‘The Queen gestured to a tray that had been placed beside the bed filled with all sorts of food.’
    • ‘The plates may be placed in the refrigerator until ready to serve.’
    • ‘Electrode pairs can be placed at various positions on the body to yield information about the status of the heart.’
    • ‘Place on a large serving plate and cut into small squares.’
    • ‘When everyone has their train in place, each player in turn places tile on the end of trains according to these rules.’
    • ‘When they sat down to eat, he placed himself beside her and strove to engage most of her attention.’
    • ‘Patients may be placed in unnatural positions for several hours during surgery.’
    • ‘Alternatively, the patient may be placed in the supine position for the abdominal prep.’
    • ‘To speed cooling divide into smaller portions, place in shallow containers or stand in a tray of cold water.’
    • ‘It's a new step for him that, for once, places mood and atmosphere ahead of the riffs.’
    • ‘A recent Sunday newspaper placed Heywood Gardens at Ballinakill in Kilkenny.’
    • ‘The bacon rashers can be placed on a heat-proof plate and put back in the oven to finish cooking till all the fat has melted and there are just very crisp bits left.’
    • ‘He grabs her off her horse and places her upside down across his lap.’
    • ‘Yesterday the memorial was roped off, and a wreath had been placed beside it.’
    • ‘I crossed my legs and placed myself beside him on the bed, the mattress sinking a little under weight.’
    • ‘Instead, each village was assigned a number and then placed randomly on the list.’
    • ‘These need a lot of space and must not be placed in a windy position.’
    • ‘Her mouth began to water at the sight of the ham and eggs, and she placed some on her plate.’
    put down, put, set, set down, lay down, deposit, position, plant, rest, stand, sit, settle, station, situate, leave, stow, prop, lean
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1 Cause to be in a particular situation.
      ‘enemy officers were placed under arrest’
      ‘you are not placing yourself under any obligation’
      • ‘Furthermore, you are placing yourself in a position in which your own participation in worship will be less than desirable for your personal edification and for the good of all.’
      • ‘A prisoner may not be placed in a situation that can endanger him or her or otherwise result in physical or other harm.’
      • ‘He told her how he had been suddenly placed in a position of terrible difficulty, from which neither honour nor duty would allow him to recede.’
      • ‘Whether you are relying on the kindness of friends, relatives or strangers, you are placing yourself in a position of dependence rather than independence.’
      • ‘She appeared before a judge in Grasse on Saturday and was placed under investigation for murder.’
      • ‘However, our cricket authorities and players should never have been placed in this position by the Government.’
      • ‘Despite evidence that placing myself in the position of a finger-wagging instiller of high principles didn't work, it was impossibly hard to avoid.’
      • ‘I will be placed in the position of needing to teach somebody to be able to have someone to practice with.’
      • ‘He was placed under formal investigation, a step short of being charged.’
      • ‘She not only placed herself in the position of telling lies, but endangered the lives of children for personal gain.’
      • ‘However, the board's decision has placed Robson and the senate in a very difficult position.’
      • ‘Lecturers have been placed in the position where they are not so much leaders as followers of their students.’
      • ‘Whether or not they realize it, they have been placed in an incredible position of historic responsibility.’
      • ‘The police apologised to me for the position in which I had been wrongly placed.’
      • ‘Every time a player is forced into or places himself in a position of having to rely on raw strength he is at a detriment.’
      • ‘Italy will be favourites but I feel we've placed ourselves in a position to compete well with them.’
      • ‘And I did understand that I was being placed in a position that I could no longer be with my family.’
      • ‘There, he may be placed under formal investigation for drugs offences - a step that would be one short of a formal charge.’
      • ‘Hence, they are resolute in not placing themselves in a position of having to acquiesce to another agreement hammered out by the rich countries.’
      • ‘So countries generally try very hard to avoid being placed in that position.’
    2. 1.2 Used to express the attitude someone has toward someone or something.
      ‘I am not able to place any trust in you’
      • ‘How much emphasis has been placed on qualitative research methodology as opposed to its application?’
      • ‘Why is it that society places so much emphasis on how you spend this one day?’
      • ‘It is for this reason that Chinese society places such strong emphasis on the honour and obedience one owes to one's parents.’
      • ‘The values that individuals or society place on different outcomes may change over time.’
      • ‘I give both of them a high five for placing quality of life over signing for top dollar.’
      • ‘Thus this theory places little importance on the effects of individual dispositions on cognitive appraisal.’
      • ‘His argument places too much importance on what is essentially a phantom text.’
      • ‘Far from rejecting male and female aspects, it places prime importance on them.’
      • ‘The mindset devalues images and places words in a privileged relation to truth.’
      • ‘The Irish education system is noted for its high rates of participation and the high value society places on it.’
      • ‘We have placed all of our trust in our concept of ourselves, and withdrawn our trust from experience.’
      • ‘To attain these goals, emphasis must be placed on the quality of training of teachers at the primary and secondary levels.’
      • ‘The album showcases the importance the band places on rhythm over pure volume.’
      • ‘One thing you cannot help notice is the importance they places on singles.’
      • ‘Now the right to down a pint has been placed on an equal footing with human rights such as freedom of expression by a Scottish council.’
      • ‘The lack of importance the industry places on instruction also is holding it back, he says.’
      • ‘It also places more importance on high pitching moments at high speeds, and less on the ones at low speeds.’
      • ‘It illustrates the political pressures that have been placed on some American intelligence experts.’
      • ‘He also objects to the conceptual limits society places on writers or that writers place on themselves.’
      • ‘He also places some importance on the first line his character speaks, in order to gauge the type of person he is.’
      put, lay, set, pin, invest
      View synonyms
    3. 1.3be placed Used to indicate the degree of advantage or convenience enjoyed by someone or something as a result of their position or circumstances.
      [with infinitive] ‘the company is well placed to seize the opportunity’
      • ‘Its employees must be better placed than most to pay parking charges.’
      • ‘He thinks that Britain is uniquely placed to exploit the advantages of its genetic diversity.’
      • ‘He was best placed to take advantage and went on to win from Charlie with McAlpin third.’
      • ‘Although we operate throughout the UK, it is our staff who are best placed to identify needs within their communities.’
      • ‘I informed him that Time would be prepared to transfer the licences but he was best placed to identify potential purchasers.’
      • ‘As the dust settles we are now a little better placed to identify those businesses that are likely to benefit from the Internet revolution.’
      • ‘He, with his rugged good looks and background, was ideally placed to take advantage of this trend.’
      • ‘As a qualitative research scientist, he is ideally placed to examine the differences.’
      • ‘It is surely the case that in 2006 we are better placed to deal with a pandemic than in 1918.’
      • ‘I have come to the conclusion that the Conservative who is best placed to offer a new Tory idealism is David.’
      • ‘Each sector is now appropriately placed to take advantage of the developments in the industry in which it operates.’
      • ‘They are best placed to explain the events leading to McCreevy's funding decision.’
      • ‘Again, the local authority is best placed to identify and deal with such problems.’
      • ‘And the corollary is that people on the ground are best placed to deal with the complexity of pastoral need.’
      • ‘Second, it would be up to him, as the lawyer, to be best placed to identify a conflict.’
      • ‘It is better placed to reach out to the majority of the people in the community and many are ready to listen to their church leaders.’
  • 2Find a home or employment for.

    ‘the children were placed with foster parents’
    ‘the agency had placed 3,000 people in full-time jobs’
    • ‘She added that the council would like to improve services in the community so fewer children needed to be placed in secure accommodation.’
    • ‘In order to prevent children from being tortured, they can be temporarily placed in a foster home.’
    • ‘It is only those workers whose market wage is below the minimum wage who are placed in employment jeopardy.’
    • ‘Taken into the care of the London Borough of Newham, he was placed with a foster family in Mayland.’
    • ‘The family made the decision not to contact police until she gave birth to a baby girl, who was immediately placed with foster parents.’
    • ‘In the same vein, the entity charged with placing redundant workers into employment, has not improved.’
    • ‘They have been placed in foster care, with the expectation she will be reunited with them when she is able to cope.’
    • ‘Its overall objective is to employ, train and place individuals in the wider workplace in Wiltshire.’
    • ‘The teenager, from Darwen, had been placed with foster carers by Blackburn with Darwen Council social services.’
    • ‘In Greenwich there are over 300 children of all ages and from all sections of the community who need to be placed with foster carers.’
    • ‘Most, though, were placed with foster parents around the country, where the level of care varied enormously.’
    • ‘These puppies need to be placed in foster homes for approximately one year.’
    • ‘The children, as many as nine according to some reports, have been placed in foster homes.’
    • ‘Through this work, forty children have been placed in adoptive and foster homes.’
    • ‘Parents and leaders are best placed to impact positively on children.’
    • ‘He was taken into care before being placed with foster parents.’
    • ‘If there is no partner or willing family older children will be placed in foster care.’
    • ‘Psychologists said the child, who was immediately placed in foster care, would suffer long-term trauma.’
    • ‘It also oversees the care of more than 100 orphans who have been placed with foster families.’
    • ‘Every minute that passed signified a smaller chance that they'd be placed on temp assignments for the day.’
    find employment for, find a job for
    View synonyms
    1. 2.1 Dispose of (something, especially shares) by selling to a customer.
      • ‘Other sources have placed the opposition's share of popular support at 12 per cent.’
      • ‘It also plans to raise €8 million by placing over 53 million shares, which he has committed to buy if no new investors emerge.’
      • ‘The shares were placed with institutions at 185p, following heavy oversubscription.’
      • ‘The electrical company is now thinking of either spinning off shares of Legrand to shareholders or placing an initial public offering of Legrand shares.’
      • ‘"The controlling shareholder is placing the shares before the deal is completed, " he said.’
      • ‘Analysts on Friday predicted the shares would be placed at a significant discount.’
      • ‘Later that month a further 350,000 ordinary shares were placed at £3 per ordinary share.’
      • ‘Through that backdoor listing deal, it has booked a HK $309 million profit from placing Dong Fang Gas shares.’
      • ‘It has raised €2.8 million by placing 3.4 million shares at 82 cent each.’
      • ‘He raised some $1 billion by placing PCCW shares and plans to borrow $11 billion from banks.’
      • ‘It has been chosen to serve as the investment intermediary in placing the shares on the stock exchange.’
      • ‘The technology company raised HK $27 million by placing 96.43 million shares.’
      • ‘In effect, this means that if there is any difficulty in placing the shares, he and his associates will put up the money.’
    2. 2.2 Arrange for the recognition and implementation of (an order, bet, etc.)
      ‘they placed a contract for three boats’
      • ‘Anyone driving around in such a thing must have placed his or her order long before they knew how much it would cost, how fast it would go and how much space there was in the boot.’
      • ‘Union bosses called on the Government to give a greater commitment to UK aerospace and shipbuilding industries when placing publicly funded orders.’
      • ‘If the contractor asks for money to buy materials, make sure the order has been placed.’
      • ‘Over three days they will be placing orders for the spring and summer range for 2004.’
      • ‘At the Crown Prosecution Service in Harrogate, a spokeswoman said that an interim hospital order had been placed on Payling.’
      • ‘‘They were placing Christmas orders mostly but also some for spring 2004 for the bigger customers,’ he said.’
      • ‘If any invoice was sent without an order having been placed, this would be in breach of the Unsolicited Goods and Services Act.’
      • ‘If an offer, will CostPlus be in breach of contract in attempting to increase the price after Philip has placed an order?’
      • ‘Further complicating the effort was the process for placing something on contract.’
      • ‘But everyone who has placed such an order should be getting their copies shortly.’
      • ‘In the meantime, users can be assured their information is in a safe place, and orders can be placed securely.’
      • ‘These were now being examined and the contract would be placed shortly.’
      • ‘The contract has been placed in the hands of Alfred McAlpine Construction.’
      • ‘Sainsbury's this month confirmed it had placed its highest ever order for fair trade cotton.’
      • ‘They started at the end of January when my mother placed her Christmas card orders with the reps.’
      • ‘Orders can be placed until mid April and will be ready in early May.’
      • ‘So many people were going out to the track, pouring over the program, and placing their ‘sure bets.’’
      • ‘This time at a lower register which is both more commanding and better suited to an auditory range ruined by years placing bets at the dog track at Concreton.’
      • ‘Check with the manufacturer for the exact amount when placing your order.’
      • ‘However bad the odds against us seem, the odds against placing this bet at all are even higher.’
    3. 2.3 Order or obtain a connection for (a telephone call) through an operator.
      • ‘A precedent has been set that thuggish bigots can dictate who plays in a football match by placing one threatening telephone call to the BBC.’
      • ‘Sometimes people living in the same city prefer to keep in touch with each other through e-mail or text-messaging rather then meeting in person or placing a phone call.’
      • ‘The Upper Arlington Fire Division placed a call for a NAS-T Fire Investigation response.’
  • 3Identify or classify as being of a specified type or as holding a specified position in a sequence or hierarchy.

    ‘a survey placed the company 13th for achievement’
    • ‘The annual survey placed Egg, HSBC and Nationwide in the top three spots.’
    • ‘Frequently, however, it was difficult to determine where in the natural hierarchy a creature should be placed.’
    • ‘If that survey is correct, democrat Wong, who is placed fourth on the group list, may miss out.’
    • ‘On Monday, RSF issued its second World Press Freedom rankings, placing Ivory Coast 137th out of 166 countries.’
    • ‘Editing is the process of creating meaning horizontally along a timeline from beginning to end, by placing and sequencing images next to each other in a specific order.’
    • ‘Hampshire was placed 31st in a table of the nation's 140 education authorities.’
    • ‘In that survey Portlaoise was placed 18th in the league and deemed moderately littered.’
    • ‘She also places Linnaeus in the context of his family's religious tradition.’
    rank, order, put in order, grade, group, arrange, sort, class, classify, categorize
    View synonyms
    1. 3.1[with object, usually with negative] Remember where one has seen or how one comes to recognize (someone or something)
      ‘she eventually said she couldn't place him’
      • ‘His words that morning had placed him in her mind, and she prayed for his safety as the wall began to crumble.’
      • ‘Listeners are invited to take part in an audio game in which they must identify and place the sounds they hear.’
      • ‘Still, I couldn't place her but even her clothing, a worn leather jacket and a red knit scarf, had a certain familiarity.’
      identify, recognize, remember, put one's finger on, put a name to, pin down, locate, pinpoint
      View synonyms
    2. 3.2be placedBritish Achieve a specified position in a race.
      ‘he was placed eleventh in the long individual race’
      • ‘Sri Lanka is placed third in the Under-19, while the seniors, fifth in the Asian region.’
      • ‘He is one of the five kids who represented India in the junior category and was placed third in the overall category.’
      • ‘He was placed third in last year's championship, hosted by the Jagorawi Golf Club near Bogor.’
      • ‘In the second division he is placed on top only one game ahead of Alstonville.’
      • ‘The two horses had been nicely placed throughout the race with the favourite Our Vic being led down by some poor jumping.’
      • ‘He has won twenty-four of these races and has been placed between second and fourth in the others.’
      • ‘Singapore, who were placed third in the previous championship, are also unbeaten.’
      • ‘To date he has been placed third in a race and looks forward to the day when he rides his first winner.’
      • ‘He took part in the go-cart races in Dubai with the Sri Lanka team and was placed sixth.’
      • ‘At the inter-house meet that year he won the javelin and putt shot events and was placed third in the discus.’
      • ‘Going by common sense, any one would agree that players should be placed depending on the number of points scored by them.’
      • ‘City of Lusaka may have an easy game over Nampundwe who have not done well this season and are placed fourth on the table.’
      • ‘He was also placed fourth in the individual race whilst she was third in the Year 8 girls' race.’
      • ‘In fact it seems the visit to Carlow may have done just the trick for Brian who last Sunday moved up in the ranks to be placed fourth!’
      • ‘The Airmen showed vast improvement unlike in the league when they failed to show up to be placed last in the league.’
      • ‘Ilkley also had enough to make up a team that was placed a respectable 17th out of 67.’
      • ‘The Open Door Group was placed second with the play in Palmerstown and third in the Dunamaise Theatre.’
      • ‘Runner-up on Friday was Charlie while he was placed third.’
      • ‘He was placed in the second place and he sang My Son and Winter's Tale.’
    3. 3.3[no object] Be among the first three in a race (or the first three or four in the UK)
      • ‘The eight-year-old horse has run 20 times and has won two races and been placed seven times.’
      • ‘He has won four of 13 starts, placing in seven other races, and has earned $190,190.’
      • ‘A top-class swimmer and cross-country runner as a junior, she won the London Triathlon in 2001 and is now placing consistently well in World Cup events.’
      • ‘The Claiborne Farm homebred has won four times and placed twice in six starts on the grass.’
      • ‘He recovered to develop into one of the best of his generation at three, winning three of 11 starts and placing in five other races.’
      • ‘Prior to the win on Sunday, Warrsan had not placed in four starts this season.’
      • ‘Other German horses such as Silvano, Boreal and Paolini have all won or been placed in some of the world's biggest races over the past year.’
      • ‘Though her piece wasn't chosen as the cover, she said placing among the finalists inspired her to explore her talent.’
      • ‘A total of 12 Super Bowl winners have placed among the top five in offense or defense.’
      • ‘Flat Top has since made 16 starts over the jumps, winning eight races and placing in five others for Gerry.’
      • ‘He has won four Grade 1 races and placed in three others while racing in the United States.’

Phrases

  • give place to

    • Be succeeded or replaced by.

      • ‘It is tempting to speculate that deactivation of COPI by some photoreceptors could help signalling via other photoreceptors giving place to synergistic effects.’
      • ‘Plows had to give place to politics for the next four years, so it was not until the end of 1793, when he was on the brink of retirement from George Washington's cabinet, that Jefferson took measures to test his theory.’
      • ‘Among countries bordering the Indian Ocean and a seismically dangerous hinterland, distrust must give place to collaboration.’
      • ‘Undefined intuitions and feelings give place to clear, definite ideas.’
      • ‘Opportunistic approaches should give place to strategic approaches that are firmly rooted in sustainable business practices.’
      • ‘By the 1930s, however, these approaches were already giving place to a very different estimate of the play's artistic success.’
      • ‘The concept of charity thus gives place to that of justice.’
      • ‘Comradeship gives place to a chastened individuality.’
      • ‘The present school-house will soon give place to a more extensive and pretentious one, to be built on a more elevated situation.’
      • ‘Whatever he was doing, he contrived to give place to the contrary pattern.’
  • go places

    • 1informal Visit places; travel.

      • ‘I get to go places because I travel with my dad sometimes.’
      • ‘If I had to do it over again I would go places, do things, and travel lighter.’
      • ‘Often it is because more people are travelling on the roads, going places and doing things, and not always concentrating on the job of driving but focussing on their destination and what they will do when they get there.’
      • ‘Soon they'll be retired and I thought that was the point of being retired - to be able to travel, visit family, go places they hadn't had time to visit while employed.’
      • ‘We have gone places together, like the interchurch women's gathering in Guelph, Ecumenical Decade: Churches in Solidarity with Women.’
      • ‘She wore the trendiest clothes, went places just to be seen and had an infectious laugh.’
      • ‘While most rely on experiences of colleagues, who have gone places last summer, some do indeed plan their own vacation.’
      • ‘We met in each others homes, went places together, prayed with each other, called each other and encouraged each other.’
      • ‘With an entourage of 65 members, including 10 women, he has been going places and giving performances, besides soliciting patronage to the art.’
      • ‘I was the one who wanted to do all the travelling, go places, instead I'm stuck here watching the pennies and getting over-excited cos they're putting a Diagnosis Murder film on Friday.’
      1. 1.1Be increasingly successful.
        • ‘‘This is one young kid who is definitely going places,’ said the Limerick Leader's television critic.’
        • ‘With the crop of youngsters he is developing West Ham could be looking to go places but of course they will sell most of them and leave Harry scouring Europe again.’
        • ‘We know of him from his days at Barnsley when he was a young player who looked like he was going places.’
        • ‘In other words, a big reason for the Heat's success is he has the players convinced they can go places if they focus on moving the ball, and mostly, being ultra-aggressive on defense.’
        • ‘I can't help but feel that this band is definitely going places.’
        • ‘This is a leadership that is succeeding and a Conservative Party that is going places again.’
        • ‘I'm not calling the board dishonest or anything but, the way it was run, this club was not going places.’
        • ‘We saw them in Barfly the other day, and they are definitely going places.’
        • ‘For Gibb, the realisation that her career was beginning to go places, after years spent with scripts stuck in development hell, came this spring.’
        • ‘It shows Selby Town are really going places, building on the recent success of the teams.’
        thrive, prosper, bloom, be in good shape, be in good health, be well, be strong, be vigorous, be in its heyday
        View synonyms
  • in place

    • 1Working or ready to work; established.

      • ‘Once my furnishings were in place and the draperies ordered it was too late to change my mind anyway.’
      • ‘Systems can also be put in place to starve a vehicle of fuel, bringing it to a slow halt.’
      • ‘Members voted against this in order to keep last year's car parking budget in place.’
      • ‘He was due to be out on a course last week, so normal cover arrangements were in place.’
      • ‘It was not until after these arrangements were in place that matters began to move forward.’
      • ‘It is hoped that a new model to calculate fees will be established and in place by next year.’
      • ‘A new government system for the auditing of public accounts has been in place for two years.’
      • ‘Several proposals have been considered, but as yet no feasible plans are in place.’
      • ‘So what contingency plans are in place in case the almost unimaginable were to happen?’
      • ‘Arrangements would be put in place to make sure he was kept away from patients who did not wish to see him.’
      establish, set up, start, begin, get going, initiate, institute, form, found, create, bring into being, inaugurate, organize, lay the foundations of, build, construct, install, plant
      ready, set up, established, arranged, in order, all set
      View synonyms
    • 2Not traveling any distance.

      ‘running in place’
      • ‘Like hamsters on an exercise wheel, we ran in place, facing a long mirror and staring at ourselves.’
      in position, in situ
      View synonyms
  • in place of

    • Instead of.

      • ‘In place of high walls and legions of armed guards, security largely depended on a metal door with a padlock.’
      • ‘In place of the advertised post there will be a short public information post.’
      • ‘In place of jammed highways, the city will have an emerald necklace of parkland.’
      • ‘In place of scientific procedure we get a confusing display of theatricality.’
      • ‘In place of the Queen's crest on the front would be the 12 yellow stars of the European flag.’
      • ‘In place of the spokes in all four wheels he inserted odd markings that read as blurs.’
      • ‘In place of traffic wardens, a team of 40 parking attendants now patrols our streets.’
      • ‘In place of regulations, guidance is likely to be issued to schools to follow before reaching a decision.’
      • ‘In place of a glass of vintage claret, the normal refreshment was green tea at around four.’
      • ‘In place of a tune it has some sophisticated harmonies that complement intelligent lyrics.’
      instead of, as an alternative for, rather than, as a substitute for, as a replacement for, in exchange for, in lieu of
      in someone's stead
      View synonyms
  • keep someone in his (or her) place

    • Keep someone from becoming presumptuous.

      • ‘Forcefully taken away from this home, which probably never felt quite comfortable, she is now recreating it as a useless cage that keeps her in her place as an immigrant.’
      • ‘From his perspective this will just be another in a long run of attempts to keep him in his place by Downing Street.’
      • ‘Mom, however, pointed a judging finger at him and gave him the patented Mom-deathstare, which kept him in his place.’
      • ‘But she still wants to keep him in his place, because she knows who will replace her when she loses the next general election.’
      • ‘He described that decision as ‘completely and utterly barmy’, adding: ‘Clearly, in retrospect, it was designed to overload her and switch her off because he wanted to keep her in her place.’’
      • ‘Despite his military accomplishments, which overshadow his own, it seems that the only thing most white Americans care about is putting and keeping him in his place.’
      • ‘His instincts implored him to edge forward, but the gunpowder barrels, whether full or not, kept him in his place.’
      • ‘She tolerated her more sociable brother with a grace that alternated between good and ill, occasionally battering him with an outstretched paw to keep him in his place.’
      • ‘The Prince loves her deeply, but he also wants to keep her in her place.’
      • ‘As much as I love him, keeping him in his place on the show kept me on my toes.’
  • out of place

    • 1Not in the proper position; disarranged.

      • ‘He simply implied that the chair was out of place and he moved it to where he thought it should be.’
      • ‘He is so suave he won't run for fear of getting a strand of hair out of place.’
      • ‘As she leaned her head down to drink her beverage a lock of hair fell out of place into her eyes.’
      • ‘She felt a sudden urge to straighten his curly brown hair where it had fallen out of place.’
      • ‘What seems more likely is that he is now so celebrated by the establishment that he is forgiven the odd pint or hair out of place.’
      • ‘Not even a stand of hair was out of place, but that didn't surprise him with the amount of hair spray that she used.’
      • ‘Another girl decided she had to re-do her hair every time it fell out of place.’
      • ‘Toby adjusted the man's tie and fixed a hair that was out of place, patted him on the arm with a smile and walked away.’
      • ‘The young lady in the Range Rover emerges from the rest room with nary a hair out of place.’
      • ‘Furniture was pushed out of place, walls spattered with teabag stains and the floor was covered in glitter.’
      out of position, out of order, in disorder, disarranged, in disarray, disorganized, in a mess, messy, topsy-turvy, muddled
      View synonyms
      1. 1.1In a setting where one is or feels inappropriate or incongruous.
        • ‘I wouldn't call the new shelters ugly, but they certainly look out of place.’
        • ‘His diving technique would certainly not be out of place in an Olympic pool.’
        • ‘Many Scots-Italians feel slightly out of place in both countries, outsiders wherever they go.’
        • ‘Snow wouldn't have been out of place and I remember always longing for a white Christmas.’
        • ‘The neat and professionally dressed men looked out of place in the homey messy surroundings.’
        • ‘We were the ones out of place and I do the best I can to deal with it.’
        • ‘It looked so awkward and out of place up in the forest canopy, I was worried at any moment it might crash down on us.’
        • ‘He said the distance from neighbouring properties was acceptable and the design of the new building would be out of place.’
        • ‘Travelling alone, she looked entirely out of place among the skimpily dressed holidaymakers.’
        • ‘While that works in a movie as unreal as Anchorman or Elf, it feels out of place in an alleged family comedy.’
        inappropriate, unsuitable, unseemly, Improper, untoward, inapposite, out of keeping, unbecoming, unfit, misplaced, wrong
        incongruous, out of one's element, like a fish out of water, uncomfortable, ill at ease, uneasy
        View synonyms
  • place in the sun

    • A position of favor or advantage.

      • ‘The Minstermen deserve their current place in the sun and with so many positives to come from Saturday's showing who's to say it won't last beyond the end of summer.’
      • ‘Eventually, many other middle-income countries will have their place in the sun at the expense of the entire continent.’
      • ‘Of course, the big silver symbol of hurling success was conspicuous by its absence but, judging from the comments made on stage, one can take for certain that Cork will reclaim their place in the sun as fast as is humanly possible.’
      • ‘The artists are ‘upstarts,’ fighting for a place in the sun, unafraid to confront or even elbow aside their elders.’
      • ‘Since its place in the sun over a decade ago, it has transformed from a cultural wasteland into a vibrant, exciting destination attracting 20 times the number of tourists it used to.’
      • ‘Farnhill is moving towards becoming a modern village steeped in tradition and respectful of the diverse needs of residents and guests who we will look forward to welcoming in our delightful rural hillside place in the sun.’
      • ‘He genuinely didn't expect this last chance at a place in the sun.’
      • ‘It is easy to imagine them patting she on the back for finding her own place in the sun.’
      • ‘Perhaps he really was only seeking what he sometimes said he was - the return of territory, the unification of the Germanic peoples, a place in the sun - and not world conquest.’
      • ‘Meanwhile he enjoyed his place in the sun.’
  • put oneself in someone's place

    • Consider a situation from someone's point of view.

      • ‘I often find myself, both in this blog and in real life, asking people (particularly childless ones) to put themselves in my place before judging me too harshly.’
      • ‘Where's the understanding or sympathy for the desperate plight of other humans beings, and the willingness to put ourselves in their place?’
      • ‘We've got children of our own and I've tried to put myself in their place - I can't imagine how they must feel.’
      • ‘Just try to put yourself in her place every once in a while.’
      • ‘If you put yourself in their place, and think what you would have done in the circumstances, you might have brought about the same results.’
      • ‘I know Ministers have a lot of paperwork but put yourself in her place.’
      • ‘I put myself in the mother 's place and I feel the heartache of not just losing a child, but knowing that I was in some way to blame.’
      • ‘When you know someone in the injured player's family, the tragedy is brought closer to ‘home’, magnified if you like, and you begin to put yourself in the player's place.’
      • ‘He puts himself in their place before making any decisions affecting them.’
      • ‘It was round about now in 1997 that I was going through exactly the same process as these new applicants, but I'm finding it very difficult to put myself in their place.’
  • put someone in his (or her) place

    • Deflate or humiliate someone regarded as being presumptuous.

      • ‘He then claims that he was put in his place by Maggie, the writer's aunt, who ran a shop in the town.’
      • ‘She says that, after an initial nervousness that the heckler is going to throw her off, the audience love her all the more for putting him in his place.’
      • ‘If that doesn't put her in her place, don't waste time mixing it up with her.’
      • ‘He wasn't surprised that his father had grabbed her with the intention of putting her in her place.’
      • ‘Mike would immediately put him in his place for he did not suffer fools or their antics.’
      • ‘There is one, for example, The Actress's Tale, in which a famous actress comes to York for Ascot and she is put in her place by the people of York.’
      • ‘I'm writing this article because I feel like I as a young Latino, I need to put him in his place.’
      • ‘He figures in a walk-on role in the drama of the Nathadwara artists, one of whom he appears to have crushed by decisively putting him in his place.’
      • ‘John's logic here is hardly unassailable, and the lass promptly puts him in his place by taking up with a married middle-aged bank manager.’
      • ‘That was a bit harsh perhaps, but I could not resist putting him in his place.’
      humiliate, take down a peg or two, deflate, crush, squelch, squash, humble, mortify, make someone eat humble pie, take the wind out of someone's sails
      cut down to size, settle someone's hash
      make someone eat crow
      View synonyms
  • take place

    • Occur.

      • ‘A general consultation has already taken place and the next stage will be a series of public meetings.’
      • ‘One meeting has already taken place and we expect the programme to run over the next two years.’
      • ‘Several peace marches have already taken place at the site and a peace camp has been set up nearby.’
      • ‘A small degree of fund-raising has already taken place but there will be more to come.’
      • ‘Discussions have already taken place about the merger since both schools have been hit by falling numbers.’
      • ‘Initial talks have already taken place and Joy is confident the case for change can be successfully argued.’
      • ‘Two meetings of the steering group behind the proposal have already taken place.’
      • ‘So many changes to the town and surrounding lands have already taken place and yet there are many more to come.’
      • ‘The surface was ready to play on so quickly because the settlement of the soil had already taken place in Yorkshire.’
      • ‘Much of what economists do is analyse the statistics of what has already taken place.’
      happen, occur, come about, transpire, crop up, materialize, arise, chance, fall out
      go down
      come to pass, befall, betide
      View synonyms
  • take one's place

    • Take up the physical position or status in society that is correct or due for one.

      • ‘You took your place alongside, or backstage and onstage, to some extent during rehearsals and where you could, you were part of performances.’
      • ‘When I turned eighteen I joined the Order of the Eastern Star and finally took my place with Mother and the other ladies in those meetings about which I'd long wondered.’
      • ‘After her release from prison in 1919 the Countess took her place in the Dail Eireann where she held the position of Minister for Labour.’
      • ‘It was very much a late late show at the RSC on Friday night as Waterford United took their place at the top of the Eircom League with their second straight win on the trot.’
      • ‘Just because you have passed a few exams and ticked a few boxes, it doesn't mean that you are in an ideal position to take your place in society.’
      • ‘At the end of a long apprenticeship, a young man was expected to produce a ‘masterpiece’, i.e. a piece of work which proved that he had mastered his craft and was capable of taking his place among the recognised practitioners.’
      • ‘She thus takes her place as a literary mediator, teaching us to recognize the validity of other stories about selves as a first step toward rethinking the stories we have told and will tell.’
      • ‘Kevin could be perfectly positioned to take his place in the dark reign of hackers and spammers.’
      • ‘Ultimately when I retired there were plenty of them in position to take my place.’
      • ‘Despite being bruised and shaken, he took his place on the grid in 24th position - way behind his rivals.’
  • take the place of

    • Replace.

      • ‘Collaboration and cooperation replaced gossip, and teamwork took the place of quarrels.’
      • ‘A new hot-water perimeter heating system replaced the original steam radiators; a constant-volume-reheat system took the place of the window units.’
      • ‘Today the whole process of collecting sap and producing syrup has been mechanized, plastic tubing taking the place of galvanized pails and the woodstoves replaced by electric boilers and automatic evaporators.’
      • ‘The shiny black pant is really taking the place of where jeans and white jeans and black jeans use to be.’
      • ‘Her last studio album Medulla was recorded a cappella and had her multi-layering her voice to create an audacious wall-of-sound in which the human voice took the place of all the instruments.’
      • ‘This new system of communication took the place of the previous messaging system that involved the use of two pay-phones and a message board where messages were written down for residents by passers-by.’
      • ‘Phillip, whom I am taking the place of, showed me round the building.’
      • ‘Replacements had been temporarily appointed to take the place of the absent officers and the service was functioning normally, he said.’
      • ‘Chess takes the place of all the other passions, and the people in his life, including his parents, become shadowy, meaningless figures.’
      • ‘An obvious annoyance is the way English is seeping into Japanese, often taking the place of perfectly good native words as users try to be fashionable.’
      replace, stand in for, be a substitute for, substitute for, act for, fill in for, cover for
      take over from, relieve
      View synonyms

Origin

Middle English: from Old French, from an alteration of Latin platea open space from Greek plateia (hodos) broad (way).

Pronunciation

place

/plās/