Main definitions of pit in English

: pit1pit2

pit1

noun

  • 1A large hole in the ground.

    • ‘Squeezing through the hole we entered an even larger cave filled with burial pits.’
    • ‘He promptly drove into a huge, open manure pit.’
    • ‘Edwards is attacked and thrown into some sort of pit.’
    • ‘The excavations have exposed two Norman rubbish pits containing twelfth-century ceramics and animal bones.’
    • ‘A pit is dug in the ground and filled with rocks, and meat and vegetables are placed into it.’
    • ‘The huge pit, 30 metres deep and the size of ten football pitches, will be crammed full of household and business waste and will take just two years to fill up.’
    • ‘First he put a bunch of stones in a big fire, then he put the stones in a pit dug in the ground, put stones over the top, and covered it with moss, sticks and sand.’
    • ‘The other child fell into an open slurry pit.’
    • ‘The burial pits contain approx. 6,000 life size figures.’
    • ‘Two black bear skulls were recovered from deep roasting/refuse pits located only about 20 m apart.’
    • ‘Others excavated rifle pits where the ground was soft enough for digging.’
    • ‘Below, the stream tumbles noisily into a large pit broken by an enormous spike of rock.’
    • ‘The pit is very deep and is always filled to the brim with leaves.’
    • ‘All bodies should be buried in deep pits outside of the village and their clothes should also be burnt.’
    • ‘On Michael's instructions, Barry had dug a pit two feet deep and two feet square.’
    • ‘He gulped as he crawled down the side of the deep pit.’
    • ‘Imagine two roads: one smooth, well-paved, well-maintained, the other lumpy and full of cracks and pits.’
    • ‘Freed, he swung his legs up and over the pit's edge, breaking the ankle of the would-be killer.’
    • ‘He accidentally fell into a pit and suffered multiple fractures in his spinal cord.’
    • ‘I do not see any risk of these pits becoming breeding grounds for mosquitoes.’
    hole, ditch, trench, trough, hollow, shaft, mineshaft, excavation, cavity, pothole, rut
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1 A large deep hole from which stones or minerals are dug.
      • ‘Each hollow is the partly infilled remains of an extraction pit or mine shaft cut through the chalk to reach seams of flint below.’
      • ‘As quarrying expanded, five pits were eventually opened.’
      • ‘The trailer park is set around some flooded gravel pits.’
      • ‘For the next six months while the pit was being mined, Green Hill produced about 180 specimens of wire gold on crystallized quartz.’
      • ‘A wetlands conservation project in old quarries and gravel pits in North Yorkshire has won a national award.’
      • ‘Grown on a disused china clay pit, the project has helped regenerate the area.’
      • ‘I also intended fishing another small gravel pit, a pit hardly fished but from which I'd heard rumours of tench to over 8 pounds.’
      • ‘We do have 40 acres of land containing overgrown colliery shale, fly tipping and flooded clay pits.’
      • ‘The lake, irregularly shaped and nearly ninety feet deep in some spots, was formerly a gravel pit.’
      • ‘Most of my fishing with this float is on large gravel pits that tend to be rather deep, demanding the use of a sliding float.’
      • ‘When the season for quarrying began, the pits sprang to life and the pace continued rapidly until the first deep frost at which time quarrying ceased.’
      • ‘New gravel pits have been excavated along the Hudson Bay coast to supply material for road and runway construction.’
      • ‘After the arrival of Westerners, the tar from these pits was mined and used for roofing.’
      • ‘Stone from this pit was a deep, rich chocolate brown and was certainly the most popular stone with both the contractor and the public.’
      • ‘The quarry pits aroused the curiosity of the first European-American settlers on the ridge at the beginning of the nineteenth century.’
      • ‘The gravel pit was dug in the river's flood plain.’
      • ‘With hand tools we worked into the banks of the broad, shallow, open pits that exploited the deposit.’
    2. 1.2 A coal mine.
      • ‘In 1759 he was put in charge of the duke of Bridgwater's canal between his coal pits at Worsley and Manchester.’
      • ‘Seven pits are scheduled for closure in the region, and 35,000 jobs will be lost.’
      • ‘Their lives are governed by steam whistles that summon them to the pits.’
      • ‘Anyone who has ever been down a pit returns to the surface with deep respect for those who make a career of mining.’
      • ‘The pit closures that followed the strike saw communities dispossessed of their living.’
      • ‘Before the establishment of regular roads and a turnpike system the transportation of coal from the pit was the main impediment to expansion.’
      • ‘We also had a mining industry until the pit closures.’
      • ‘Slag heaps from dozens of coal pits dot the countryside.’
      • ‘A decade ago, 15,000 miners worked in the coal pits; today there are less than 4,000.’
      • ‘We surveyed 16 large collieries, each with many pits and a working force of at least 100 miners.’
      • ‘Union leaders claim there are at least 90m tonnes of unworked coal still in the pit that could take the best part of 20 years to mine.’
      • ‘Just nine deep pits survive in operation today.’
      • ‘The lack of regulation and enforcement of safety standards led to thousands of deaths in coal pits.’
      • ‘Theirs is an uncomplicated life of going down the pit, entertaining at working men's clubs, and hard drinking.’
      • ‘In the field on top of the brow was a ventilation shaft which descended to the depths of the coal pit below.’
      • ‘A grim future awaits the area if the pits are allowed to go under.’
      • ‘The first of Selby's three deep pits, Wistow, is due to close by Christmas, followed by the other two, Stillingfleet and Riccall, next year.’
      • ‘We launched a campaign to persuade the Government and UK Coal to keep the pits open, but it seems to have failed.’
      • ‘By this time next year there will only be seven deep coal mining pits left in this country.’
      • ‘In the last 18 months alone, it is understood the pit has lost an average of £1m each month.’
      coal mine, colliery, quarry, workings, diggings
      View synonyms
    3. 1.3 A sunken area in a workshop floor allowing access to a car's underside.
      • ‘When I had it over the pit the exhaust seemed to have been cobbled together from a few different bits.’
      • ‘He told how he had spent many years on the workshop floor, often in the pit, as this was the time before rafts and lifts.’
      • ‘Some autos are held upright in pits five feet deep, trunk end down.’
      • ‘One of the staff comes out into the carpark, without putting the car over the pit.’
      • ‘The double garage is fitted with an inspection pit for car servicing.’
      • ‘The mechanic's pit in the garage had been converted into a bomb shelter.’
    4. 1.4 A low or wretched psychological state.
      ‘spiraling downward into the pit of despair’
      • ‘Without him, the slow dive into the pit of despair would be relentless.’
      • ‘The harder I worked to dig myself out of the pit of self-pity, the more I got involved in activities that took me outside of myself.’
      • ‘It seems time to finally try and come out of the dark pit of sorrow I have dug for myself.’
      • ‘All middle-aged people suffer from slowed-up powers of cognitive ability, but that does not mean that we are all going to descend into the pit of Alzheimer's.’
      • ‘Get out of the pit of negativism, I want you to be real.’
      • ‘Graduate school is a bottomless pit of paranoia and defensiveness.’
      • ‘I was in a pit of despair.’
      • ‘He would have slowly made his way back into his dark pit of depression and left everybody behind.’
      • ‘It takes me a little bit of time, but soon I am slipping back into the pit of grief, and drinking in the sorrow of the world.’
      • ‘With each word I sunk deeper and deeper into the pit of despair.’
      • ‘What they really seek to know is, how do they find someone who can actually exert some traction to help pull them out of the pit of depression.’
      • ‘My heart stopped beating and my stomach fell into a bottomless pit of despair.’
      • ‘Lee had pulled Ella out of the pit of depression she had been in so long.’
      • ‘I have to be careful not to throw the self-destruct switch when I get in a mood like this, wallowing in a pit of self-pity.’
      • ‘The bright sun today has made a great deal of difference to my mood though - if today had been like yesterday, I think I would have finally sunk into a pit of despondency.’
      • ‘She has not seen her husband for months and knows if he comes back she will lose her benefits and fall back into the pit of poverty and hopelessness.’
      • ‘I don't know how to tell you how deep the pit is that I go into when I hear that I have failed.’
      • ‘This throws Carrey's character, Joel, into a pit of despair.’
      • ‘You end up wallowing in a pit of your own self pity.’
      • ‘Let her know that she doesn't have to fight her way out of the black pit of sadness by herself.’
    5. 1.5the pitliterary Hell.
      • ‘If we do it with both eyes on ourselves, the devil will cast us into the deepest of pits.’
      • ‘This had been God's great mistake, he reflected, banishing him to the deepest pits of the world below: he had given him his own world to play with.’
      • ‘God only knows how many lost souls they've saved from the fiery pit of damnation.’
  • 2A hollow or indentation in a surface.

    • ‘The rock skipped off the hood and made a pit in the windshield, but no one came yelling out of his room.’
    • ‘The diminutive monkey in front of me puts a hard palm nut, the size of its fist, into one of the many small pits on the rock surface.’
    • ‘What had once been a set of four horrible, deep pits in her hand - two on her palm and two on the back - had turned into a scabrous mass of clotted blood.’
    • ‘The outer surface has pits, grooves, and perforations that represent traces of vascular structures.’
    • ‘Another technique for estimating age was applied to the woman: the pits on the inner surface of her skull were counted and she was estimated to be around 50 years old when she died.’
    • ‘Some people also have pits in their nails or arthritis which may be part of the disease.’
    • ‘On the ventral surface of the skull, there is a deep pit on each side of the rear of the palate.’
    • ‘Dental microwear analysis investigates the microscopic scratches and pits that form on a tooth's surface as a result of its use.’
    • ‘Some contain rounded surface pits, and show other irregularities, and grains intermediate between the two groups are present.’
    • ‘Tiny pits occur in the nails, sometimes causing the nail to separate from the nail bed.’
    • ‘The external surface texture is similar to that of the carapace, and consists of subtle low, rounded bosses with scattered small pits and thin grooves.’
    • ‘Even if the child brushes regularly and carefully, it can be impossible to clean out the grooves and pits on certain teeth.’
    • ‘Blood gushed from a deep pit in his shoulder and several jagged cuts were gouged in his torso, soaking his ceremonial robe to his skin.’
    • ‘The exoskeleton of the cranidium shows minute pits in the central area, pits which are not visible in either of Clark's specimens.’
    • ‘Stones whose surfaces have shallow pits about the size of a quarter are often unearthed at archaeological sites, but nobody is sure what their function was.’
    • ‘The pits, and other marks on the gun, give it the look of a casting, rather than a machined part.’
    • ‘In these cases, the dorsal surface of the bone will often be roughened and show pits and channels.’
    pockmark, pock, mark, hollow, indentation, depression, dent, dint, concavity, dimple
    View synonyms
    1. 2.1 A small indentation left on the skin after smallpox, acne, or other diseases; a pockmark.
      • ‘If you don't have problem skin, you're missing out on something really special; pits and blemishes add such character, don't they?’
      • ‘Sometimes, popping a pimple will cause a brown or red scar to form that could last months; and scars, in the form of dents and pits, can last forever.’
      • ‘Dents or pits in the skin can easily become filled with bits of skin and hair, and infected with bacteria.’
      • ‘Dozens of deep scars and pits ran across the length its snout.’
      • ‘I have many acne pits of varying sizes on my face.’
      pockmark, pock, mark, hollow, indentation, depression, dent, dint, concavity, dimple
      View synonyms
  • 3usually pitsAn area at the side of a track where race cars are serviced and refueled.

    • ‘Tommy climbed back on board and nursed the car back to the pits, losing several laps.’
    • ‘David had an incident at the start which forced him to come into the pits after the first lap for a new nose cone.’
    • ‘At the start of the race he was helped when several cars stalled on the grid and had to start from the pits.’
    • ‘This caused a slow puncture, forcing me into the pits after the first lap.’
    • ‘The run-off areas are too short, the pits are cramped and the paddock facilities are, by a long way, the worst of the season.’
    • ‘As most races are won and lost in the pits, Ferrari now have the advantage over every other team.’
    • ‘I had to drive it back to the pits on three wheels, but it was fun to always be in contention.’
    • ‘We were able to pass a few guys, but I was not very quick coming in and out of the pits, and that's where we lost our lap.’
    • ‘I also found it very difficult on the first lap out of the pits on new tyres.’
    • ‘Sadly, Harvey's amazing opening was not destined to bring a reward as he was forced into the pits after nine laps.’
    • ‘People walking through the pits often stop to check out the cars because they don't all look the same.’
    • ‘He pulls into the pits when there's nothing wrong with his car.’
    • ‘Break the speed limit in the pits, overtake when the yellow flags are out or cut a corner in qualifying and you'll find yourself facing the wrath of your team when you get back to the garage.’
    • ‘To truly experience this benefit you need to drop your passenger in the pits and grab yourself a few solo laps.’
    • ‘My car had a gearbox problem towards the end of my ‘out’ lap and I had to come back to the pits.’
    • ‘My crew did a great job getting me back out there, and I'm happy that we were able to finish the race on the track and not in the pits.’
    • ‘I came into the pits after one clear lap and we made some changes.’
    • ‘When I was called into the pits on lap 43 there was a small fire but that was okay.’
    • ‘She rejoined the track but was forced back to the pits as the problem remained.’
    • ‘However, on the second lap he slowed and headed for the pits, knowing that there was a problem.’
  • 4An orchestra pit.

    • ‘From now on, the only people in the music business wearing suits will be orchestras in the pit, playing live.’
    • ‘Mark then rejoined the orchestra in the pit and prepared to play.’
    • ‘The only weak point in the engineering is the lack of distinction between the chamber orchestra in the pit and the larger orchestra in the back.’
    • ‘There was nothing makeshift or provisional about it, it was a proper theatre in Georgian style, with a pit, a gallery and boxes.’
    • ‘The High School's orchestra sat in the pit waiting to play their pieces.’
    • ‘Coordination between pit and stage is very good, and the tempi are usually sprightly.’
    • ‘The excellent orchestra in the improvised pit was in fine form and added enormously to the show.’
    • ‘However, both covered and uncovered pits can colour an orchestra's sound, and the usually cramped space forces the players into awkward positions.’
    • ‘I covered the whole of the width of the stage in front of the curtains and also filled the pits.’
    • ‘The show goes ahead come rain or shine, the fourth wall is constantly broken and those in the pit are almost on-stage.’
    • ‘The members of the Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra in the pit did a great job, but their reduced numbers mean naturally a reduced sound produced.’
  • 5A part of the floor of an exchange in which a particular stock or commodity is traded, typically by open outcry.

    • ‘Trading was conducted by traders on the floor of the pit calling out and signalling to each other.’
    • ‘Although no one expects the euro to collapse, the debate is contributing to an uncertain atmosphere in foreign-exchange trading pits.’
    • ‘Most traders trade in a pit, sitting almost on top of each other where everyone can be seen and heard and all calls traced and deals marked.’
    • ‘Even now, many traders make electronic trades on handheld devices when they're in the pits.’
    • ‘Flat-screen displays ring the pits set up with trading data.’
  • 6historical An enclosure in which animals are made to fight.

    • ‘This rough, loose, prickly coat allowed the Shar-Pei to wriggle out of its opponent's grasp while fighting in the dog pits.’
    • ‘I heal the animals that fight in the pit… so long as there's enough left to heal.’
    • ‘In such contests, according to law-enforcement officials, two dogs are placed in a pit or similar area enclosed with plywood walls.’
    • ‘Perhaps we should bring back badger-baiting, cock-fighting, the bear pit, and all of those other traditional English pursuits.’
    • ‘At each fighting session, the animals are paired off against each other in a small pit or arena, enclosed by plywood or galvanised walls.’

verb

[WITH OBJECT]
  • 1pit someone/something againstSet someone or something in conflict or competition with.

    ‘a chance to pit herself against him’
    • ‘We're playing a team two divisions up in a great stadium and it's a good opportunity for us to pit our wits against them and see if we can compete.’
    • ‘The chance to pit your wits against the best players in the country, in the most sumptuous and atmospheric of football arenas, just doesn't get any better for a professional footballer.’
    • ‘She will have a chance to pit her skills against the best soon as the European Championships have been scheduled for February 16-21.’
    • ‘He will represent Ireland and will have the chance to pit his skills against 19 of the best freestylers in the world.’
    • ‘I enjoyed pitting my wits against other coaches.’
    • ‘The students are to take part in a national debating competition pitting their skill against students from over 200 schools and colleges all over Ireland.’
    • ‘He seems keen on conflict, pitting the countryside against the city.’
    • ‘This conflict pitted guerrilla forces against the national government.’
    • ‘The announcement was clearly designed to pit workers at the two factories against one another.’
    • ‘Now Mrs Barker is to pit her products against strong competition at the Great Yorkshire Cheese and Dairy Show, which is sponsored by Morrisons supermarkets.’
    • ‘But we are faced with the madness of a system that pits one worker against another.’
    • ‘Redistributing the bird nuisance often pitted one agricultural region against another.’
    • ‘That pits gas against diesel in a feverish battle for the lowest consumption and the cleanest exhaust at the cheapest price.’
    • ‘It's going to be a great occasion for my players to pit their wits against certainly the best squad in the division.’
    • ‘It was a great night for the organizers and there was a full house present to pit their wits against the question makers and test their knowledge on many a subject.’
    • ‘He pitted his skills against six others vying for the title of chef of the year.’
    • ‘In all, 10 matches were contended on the day pitting Thai boxers against foreign competitors.’
    • ‘The competition, which will pit American gymnasts against gymnasts from Russia, The Netherlands, Bulgaria, Canada, Italy, Brazil, and Mexico, is being held in the Arrowhead Pond.’
    • ‘Puzzle Planet is the latest attraction at the centre where you can pit your wits against a series of mazes, brainteasers and puzzles to see if you've got the brains to be an astronomer.’
    • ‘Triathlon is arguably the toughest branch of athletics around, pitting competitors against each other across three very different fitness categories in an utterly exhausting combination.’
    set against, match against, put in opposition to, put in competition with, measure against
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1historical Set an animal to fight against (another animal) for sport.
      • ‘Ancient Romans pitted dogs against each other in gladiatorial contests.’
      • ‘Early in his reign he took his family to watch a lion pitted against a bear.’
      • ‘When animals were pitted against each other, the Romans often tied them together with a chain to make sure that they would fight.’
      • ‘The captive badger is taken to the ‘sporting’ venue - a trench covered by Perspex - and pitted against terriers.’
      • ‘The Romans are famous for their wild beast shows in the public arenas, where animals were pitted against one another for entertainment.’
      • ‘Increasingly exotic animals were pitted against each other.’
  • 2Make a hollow or indentation in the surface of.

    ‘rain poured down, pitting the bare earth’
    • ‘The road surface is pitted with potholes and strewn with potentially dangerous objects.’
    • ‘By pitting metal surfaces, it provides a habitat for scale and bacteria to form.’
    • ‘The dirty, white stone front of the shop, which stocked boxes of beer cans, was pitted with bullet holes, while a car and lorry parked in the protected courtyard outside were badly damaged in the attack.’
    • ‘The 22 tiny patches of Martian surface revealed a barren landscape pitted with craters, like the Moon.’
    • ‘The road leading up to the bridge is pitted with large, deep potholes.’
    • ‘Shrapnel scars still pitted the walls and sandbags were stacked around every home.’
    • ‘The way was often both deeply pitted and stony.’
    • ‘The tip of the stick is often driven into the cloth with force, weakening the structure of the weave, and pitting the playing surface.’
    • ‘Much her chagrin she saw that through the ravages of time it was pitted with holes, some small others rather large.’
    • ‘His face was pitted with pockmarks and his beady eyes had come to rest a little below Ashley's throat, making his intentions perfectly clear.’
    make holes in, make hollows in, hole, dent, indent, depress, dint, pothole
    View synonyms
    1. 2.1no object Sink in or contract so as to form a pit or hollow.
      • ‘My skin pits when pressed.’
      • ‘It is distinguished from other swellings by pitting under pressure.’
      • ‘The skin becomes swollen and puffy, and pits on being pressed.’
  • 3no object Drive a race car into the pits for fuel or maintenance.

    • ‘I did some very quick laps when he pitted, so probably I made a lot of time then.’
    • ‘He pitted for his compulsory pitstop at the end of lap thirteen in ninth position and when the field regained shape he was back to ninth.’
    • ‘He began to pick up the pace and managed to climb to 6th during the first hour before pitting for fuel and fresh tyres.’
    • ‘We had to pit under green and got a couple laps down.’
    • ‘He took the lead briefly before pitting for fuel at the end of the race.’
    • ‘His time in the car was extended when he was able to pit for fresh tyres and fuel during a safety car period.’
    • ‘Fearing a puncture, he called in that he would pit on the following lap.’
    • ‘He was hit on the first lap, pitted for a new right-front tire and returned to the race near the back of the field, only to be hit again.’
    • ‘Lewis would relinquish the lead but maintained second until pitting on lap 48.’
    • ‘However, they elected not to pit for fuel during an early caution period, and that cost them time against their rivals.’
    • ‘Which laps were you supposed to pit for your second stop?’
    • ‘Miguel drove the first stint but was forced to pit early to resolve a brake problem.’
    • ‘He lost his front wing in the collision and dropped to last after pitting for a new nose.’
    • ‘We certainly wouldn't have pitted if we'd known we were going back to green on the next lap.’
    • ‘He was forced to pit again when gas was available and lost two laps.’
    • ‘He eventually pitted for gearbox repairs, but rejoined on the 47th lap - just as Button crashed.’
    • ‘When I pitted, we put a lot of fuel on board as this was the best strategy for us.’
    • ‘I limped round for another lap, but the radiator was leaking and I pitted to save the engine.’
    • ‘He climbed the leaderboard to run in as high as 7th position and lapped consistently until pitting for a driver change.’
    • ‘We don't have to pit for tires anymore.’

Phrases

  • be the pits

    • informal Be extremely bad or the worst of its kind.

      • ‘Mr Beeston said the prices of broccoli and cauliflower were the pits.’
      • ‘How could the rest of the world be so happy when my life was the pits?’
      • ‘The training was held in Pyrmont, meaning that parking was the pits.’
      • ‘As boring as daytime stakeout seemed, nighttime surveillance was the pits.’
      • ‘He said: ‘The thought that I set up and put someone in prison, whether a friend or not, is the pits.’’
      • ‘Then having to ask him for a ride home is the pits, man.’
      • ‘Working as a kitchen maid is the pits.’
      • ‘This is hard work and it's frustrating, because losing is the pits.’
      • ‘The reader pointed out that the city is the pits - dirty, lots of poverty, lots of unrest, no shops no industry, absolutely nothing for anyone.’
      • ‘Not many people would have the nerve to tell their new boss that they thought the company's headquarters was the pits.’
      the worst, the lowest of the low
      View synonyms
  • the pit of one's (or the) stomach

    • An ill-defined region of the lower abdomen regarded as the seat of strong feelings, especially anxiety.

      • ‘It obviously hits the pit of your stomach when a tragedy like this happens and it involves people you work with on a daily basis.’
      • ‘Going back to school after the long summer break always left me with a leaden feeling of dread in the pit of my stomach.’
      • ‘Although I had a bad feeling in the pit of my stomach there is a bright side’
      • ‘You get a queasiness in the pit of your stomach, because you're going to deliver some really tough news.’
      • ‘I wish I could get rid of this horrible knotted feeling in the pit of my stomach.’
      • ‘I am not being patronising, far from it, because I know exactly what their fans must be enduring and it leaves a terrible emptiness at the pit of your stomach.’
      • ‘Why was the nervous feeling in the pit of his stomach so strong he felt nauseous?’
      • ‘It's that feeling one gets in the pit of one's stomach, a combination of embarrassment and anger at the idiocy of it all.’
      • ‘He has been well trained for it but you do get a fear in the pit of your stomach when you think about what could happen to him.’
      • ‘When you wake up on a Sunday morning, you can feel the loneliness gnawing at the pit of your stomach.’

Origin

Old English pytt, of West Germanic origin; related to Dutch put and German Pfütze, based on Latin puteus ‘well, shaft’.

Pronunciation

pit

/pit//pɪt/

Main definitions of pit in English

: pit1pit2

pit2

noun

North American
  • The stone of a fruit.

    • ‘I took a ripe avocado and rolled it between my hands until the skin became a green case for the soft mashed fruit inside, hard pit at the core.’
    • ‘Carefully trim off the skin and cut the flesh from around the oval pit.’
    • ‘John kicked a fruit pit across the road into a door.’
    • ‘She hurriedly picked at the dangling cherries from the tree, and put them in her basket while at the same time eating them, spitting the pits onto the rocky ground.’
    • ‘Chefs suggest pressing on the olive with your thumb firmly to split open the olive and loosen the pit.’
    • ‘I raise my face, even as a peach pit hits my forehead.’
    • ‘The peels of apples, pears and most fruits with pits add interesting texture to recipes and contain added nutrients and fiber.’
    • ‘To cut an avocado, hold it in your hand and slice through the skin and the flesh to the pit all the way around, lengthwise.’
    • ‘Young children can choke on certain foods (such as meats, nuts, seeds, candy, fruit pits, and popcorn).’
    • ‘The bones, shells, and fruit pits found in the privy suggest a household well supplied with food and drink.’
    • ‘Cherry pits are known to be deadly, and other fruit pits may contain trace amounts of cyanide and are dangerous to your birds.’
    • ‘The fruit's peel and pit are also of medical use.’
    • ‘Some are made from coal, wood, or sawdust, while others are made from peach pits, olive pits, or coconut shells.’
    • ‘While swallowed fruit pits are more common than was once thought, they rarely cause symptoms and intestinal obstruction.’
    • ‘Before crushing, the fruit is separated for quality and the stems, leaves, seeds, and pits are removed.’
    • ‘The fruits have a pit at the end away from the stem.’
    stone, pip, seed
    View synonyms

verb

[WITH OBJECT]North American
  • Remove the pit from (fruit).

    • ‘Leave some cherries whole so people can see later on how hard you worked pitting real cherries.’
    • ‘Just before serving, peel and pit the avocado.’
    • ‘I cut the cherries in half and pitted them.’
    • ‘If you're pitting cherries, do it inside a Ziploc bag.’
    • ‘Wash fruits well, pit and peal peaches and core pears.’

Origin

Mid 19th century: apparently from Dutch; related to pith.

Pronunciation

pit

/pit//pɪt/