Definition of piracy in English:

piracy

noun

  • 1The practice of attacking and robbing ships at sea.

    • ‘To fight both piracy and terrorism, the IMB proposes pooling resources among the countries sharing sea-lane boundaries.’
    • ‘While the waterway has seen no major terrorist attacks, piracy is widespread.’
    • ‘To send armed forces onboard a civil ship sending out Mayday signals is piracy.’
    • ‘Property insurance developed in response to the hazards faced by medieval exporters, for example losses from shipwreck, piracy, or theft.’
    • ‘Our goal is to destroy and delegitimize terrorism the way slavery and piracy were delegitimized in the nineteenth century.’
    • ‘Koizumi told reporters that many incidents of piracy have occurred despite shipping companies' own efforts to protect themselves.’
    • ‘Subjects now range far beyond the Great Lakes, from piracy on the high seas to the environmental health of our oceans.’
    • ‘North Korea has denied having any connection with the ship and denounced its sinking as an ‘act of piracy.’’
    • ‘A taste for violence has been a feature of attacks since piracy began.’
    • ‘The terrorist / piracy threat also meant escort ships were needed to ensure safe passage on the seas.’
    • ‘There the Africans stood trial for piracy and murder in a much publicized case, even for that day.’
    • ‘The code was introduced by the International Maritime Organisation to deter terrorism, piracy and other criminal acts.’
    • ‘She couldn't possibly wear it often, and much less know about ships and piracy.’
    • ‘Recent examples of Somalian piracy includes raids on ships carrying supplies for the UN World Food Programme.’
    • ‘Providing a worrying statistic he said that 60 per cent of the world's acts of piracy happened in South East Asian waters.’
    • ‘No deaths were reported from piracy attacks in the first three months of the year, although pirates were said to be armed with guns, knives and other weapons.’
    • ‘And it could under certain circumstances lead to unilateral action to suppress piracy and terrorism in the Malacca Strait.’
    • ‘The IMB reported that between January and March this year, the Malacca Straits have seen seven piracy attacks.’
    • ‘Naval warfare experts say the U.S. Navy simply isn't large enough to do much about the problem, whether it's piracy or terrorism.’
    • ‘Now, as I write, Australia threatens to forcibly remove the ship from our waters and the ship's owner accuses us of piracy.’
    robbery at sea, freebooting
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1 A practice similar to piracy but in other contexts, especially hijacking.
      ‘air piracy’
      • ‘National leadership and more pervasive international co-operation will also be essential in order to keep mafia and piracy practices from resurging.’
      • ‘They said they could not send all the substantiation they held about the link between piracy and terrorism because it was confidential.’
      • ‘Whether the pressure was to such an extent that the words piracy or ‘hi-jacking’ could be used, will be up to a court of law to determine.’
      • ‘There are many fine houses here as well as vast warehouses, all of which are walled and well guarded, for piracy and theft are as common as regular trade here.’
      • ‘What happens if someone tries to board the island, in the name of art piracy or stunt publicity?’
      • ‘Terror, piracy, and smuggling are expanding threats.’
      • ‘We will take the fight to all those involved in piracy and contraband trafficking.’
      • ‘Mumbai police arrested a person in relation with illegal piracy at the domestic airport in the wee hours of Saturday morning.’
      • ‘Each was convicted on December 11 of air piracy and faces 20 years to life in prison.’
      • ‘The authors' area of expertise is clearly in energy security, but while floundering in piracy and terrorism they have lost their way.’
      • ‘Dickens's reaction to these piracies varied from amused contempt to downright vexation.’
      • ‘On May 17, a West German court convicted Mohammad Ali Hamadei of murder and air piracy and sentenced him to life imprisonment.’
      • ‘You turned to piracy, you steal, you plunder, you lie, you cheat… you kill.’
      • ‘The topic was the arming of airline pilots as a defense against air piracy and terrorism.’
      • ‘Their courtship had begun in the early days of his time at Parchman, just weeks after his ill-fated dabble in air piracy.’
      • ‘While piracy and terrorism may not be the same crime, they share enough elements to merit joint definition under international law.’
      • ‘Nevertheless, Mr. Critton's act of air piracy is very much the context of the crimes for which he is to be sentenced.’
    2. 1.2 The unauthorized use or reproduction of another's work.
      ‘software piracy’
      • ‘BOOK piracy, the illegal reproduction of books, has assumed menacing proportions over the last two decades.’
      • ‘Software piracy is rife across the continent and costs African governments an estimated total of around US $1 billion per year.’
      • ‘In the last part of your article you liken the act of music piracy to the theft of physical property.’
      • ‘Yet some of the quotes clearly aren't about that at all - they refer to music piracy, or bootlegging, or unofficial releases.’
      • ‘Notable features of Windows XP are that it is faster that previous operating systems reduces the possibility of piracy and theft of both hardware and software.’
      • ‘None of that music seemed to be going to the incinerators, and the flow of piracies was not being staunched.’
      • ‘The trouble for Russian rights owners is keeping track of Internet piracy when physical piracy is so much of a problem.’
      • ‘Willetts therefore argued that, far from destroying an industry, his piracies had no significant effect at all on existing publishers' sales.’
      • ‘Consider recent actions on bills addressing such disparate issues as homeland security, movie piracy and auto burglary.’
      • ‘Sony says that only 20 titles, which it refuses to name, contain the XCP virus - software which attacks music piracy by attacking your PC.’
      • ‘Digital cable is often considered the answer to cable signal theft and piracy, but as a final solution it's a long way off.’
      • ‘For cable operators it's over $5 billion a year - in revenues lost to signal theft and cable piracy.’
      • ‘Therefore, even if music piracy really is stealing, copyright owners don't have a right to take reasonable steps to prevent it.’
      • ‘Another important consideration is to separate movie piracy from music piracy.’
      • ‘Australian magistrates have blocked the extradition of the alleged head of a software piracy syndicate to the US.’
      • ‘This legislative framework for dealing with piracy and theft of copyrighted goods is now sent to the member states, which have two years to enact laws which comply with the directive.’
      • ‘Preston also sought the hack printers who actually produced the piracies.’
      • ‘Newton learned to exploit the commercial press by secretly publishing his works and disowning them as piracies.’
      • ‘Possibly the bank, in the light of a piracy software charge against the buyers, did not want to get involved in the case Microsoft brought against the buyers.’
      • ‘Both Hack and Blair say they are skeptical of amnesty programs and don't use them to fight piracy and cable theft efforts.’
      illegal reproduction, plagiarism, illegal copying, copyright infringement, bootlegging, stealing, theft
      View synonyms

Origin

Mid 16th century: via medieval Latin from Greek pirateia, from peiratēs (see pirate).

Pronunciation

piracy

/ˈpīrəsē//ˈpaɪrəsi/