Main definitions of pique in English

: piqué1pique2pique3

piqué1

noun

  • Stiff fabric, typically cotton, woven in a strongly ribbed or raised pattern.

    • ‘Pink Lacoste or Ralph Lauren piqué polo shirts were probably the biggest sellers and they reflected the image of a distinguished and well-mannered preppy boy.’
    • ‘Whether you're going to work or hitting hole-in-ones with your buddies, polo piqué T-shirts are where it's at.’
    • ‘Wear them to your next polo match with a polo piqué, a fine pair of khakis and your boat shoes.’
    • ‘Bloomies' spring hats range from fun and practical (how about a red Lacoste rain hat or a pink cotton piqué cap?) to stylish straws and felts.’

Origin

Mid 19th century: from French, literally ‘backstitched’, past participle of piquer.

Pronunciation

piqué

/pēˈkā//piˈkeɪ/

Main definitions of pique in English

: piqué1pique2pique3

pique2

noun

  • A feeling of irritation or resentment resulting from a slight, especially to one's pride.

    ‘he left in a fit of pique’
    • ‘The president, apparently in a fit of pique, in October abruptly postpones a long-planned summit with Britain.’
    • ‘Speaking at a Belfast news conference, Mr Ervine denied that his party had left the talks in a fit of pique.’
    • ‘They have invested too much in this season to throw it away in a fit of pique.’
    • ‘To leave now would suggest that he'd gone in a fit of pique.’
    • ‘Are Europeans going on a buyer's strike in a fit of pique over Iraq?’
    • ‘So I think senior colleagues made the wrong decision - but I can't say they made the decision in a fit of pique or envy.’
    • ‘That's worse than having him blurt out some threats in a fit of pique, he actually thought he could bring New Europe to heel.’
    • ‘Some have accused Stoiber of deliberately trying to sabotage Merkel in a fit of pique at her rapid rise.’
    • ‘Better, I suppose, that I flame on about flaming out, rather than just quit in a fit of pique after biting my tongue bloody for a month.’
    • ‘Last night, in a fit of pique, just to show me up for a liar, she took her first steps with the cane.’
    • ‘President Theodore Roosevelt, who in a fit of pique coined the term ‘muckraking’, called him a potent influence for evil.’
    • ‘It was then that in a fit of pique, the deputy smoked three cigarettes in the bar as a ‘protest’.’
    • ‘Certainly in France it was an educated decision: it was not one taken in a fit of pique or absent-mindedness.’
    • ‘That way, when you've done the deed, your spurned lover can't burn your stuff in a fit of pique.’
    • ‘She abused passengers and crew then stripped off in a fit of pique.’
    • ‘They left two-weeks ago after selling their house in a fit of pique over the fact that their grandchildren were not welcome in the complex's communal backyard.’
    • ‘Keel killed the pay-raise bill with a last-minute point of order in a fit of pique.’
    • ‘Of course it didn't happen and I went out in a fit of pique in the next hand.’
    • ‘I may, in a fit of pique, for no apparent reason that either of us can see, have ‘stuffed’ these carrots behind the water pipes.’
    • ‘What exasperated driver hasn't wanted to scream at the person in the passenger seat and snatch the map in a fit of pique?’
    irritation, annoyance, resentment, anger, displeasure, indignation, temper, bad temper, hurt pride, wounded pride, hurt feelings, wounded feelings, petulance, ill humour, peevishness, offence, umbrage, vexation, exasperation, disgruntlement, discontent, discontentment
    View synonyms

verb

  • 1with object Stimulate (interest or curiosity)

    ‘you have piqued my curiosity about the man’
    • ‘I mean, it's action and it piques people's interest but beforehand we were worried that there wasn't really enough going on.’
    • ‘Yet he should be chuffed at how history is filling our newspapers, sparking debate, piquing our interest.’
    • ‘But in addition to the election-oriented questions, there were some other answers that piqued my interest.’
    • ‘She says yes, and adds ‘I suppose when my scientific curiosity is piqued, I lose all fear.’’
    • ‘When some information is revealed about somebody, what piques your interest?’
    • ‘But when they wrote about ‘little Gong Li,’ it piqued interest.’
    • ‘Plenty of other would-be candidates, however, are piquing the interest of municipal veterans.’
    • ‘When she was in high school, Lisa Pietrusza took a social studies course that piqued her curiosity about politics.’
    • ‘But our little dialogue is supposed to pique people's interest.’
    • ‘Well, all right - it's not exactly a Thanksgiving story that warms your heart… or even piques your interest.’
    • ‘Hopefully with the press we'll pique some people's interest and they'll come see what it's all about.’
    • ‘The other guys will notice how much those guys enjoy your company - it might pique their interest.’
    • ‘Even those with only a passing interest in the subject matter should find something to pique their curiosity within.’
    • ‘This piques my scientific curiosity and I make a mental note to ask my rather strange-looking hostess about it.’
    • ‘If that sort of bluntness piques your interest, then the debut LP from Milwaukee's finest is made for you.’
    • ‘It's something that piques people's interest.’
    • ‘Of course this time it's ‘Chinese-Canadian’ Gen-X angst that piques my interest.’
    • ‘It is the tax relief measures, however, that would most pique the interest of the public.’
    • ‘Curiosity piqued my harbored interest and I stole a glance at myself, to see what others saw of me.’
    • ‘Event planners aim to give those varied interests plenty to pique their partiality.’
    stimulate, arouse, rouse, provoke, whet, awaken, excite, kindle, stir, spur, intrigue, galvanize
    View synonyms
  • 2be piquedFeel irritated or resentful.

    ‘she was piqued by his curtness’
    • ‘Apparently piqued, the NYSE gave the report to Grasso and to the media, which soon put it online, giving it to the rest of the world, too.’
    • ‘They may be even more piqued to find that Jim Wallace knew of the First Minister's heart problem three days before any of Dewar's Labour colleagues.’
    • ‘‘I can still ride okay,’ he said, sounding piqued.’
    • ‘So eggheaded am I about much of what I watch, I was rather piqued that I couldn't have both sets of subtitles on the screen at the same time.’
    • ‘Since it's now 11 pm, I'm a bit piqued at wasting an entire evening.’
    • ‘The nub of the problem is the term District which allows clubs to transfer every season if they wish and move simply because of personality clashes or piqued perhaps at disciplinary decision.’
    • ‘Like when Maradona went in a huff with Pele, piqued at not getting player of the 20th century.’
    • ‘If they ask Congress for more troops and more money, will the American people not get a bit piqued and take it out on their President?’
    • ‘And she really looked a bit piqued, and I said, ‘What's up?’’
    • ‘Turns out that swingers are just like the rest of us: happy to bury their heads in the bush and then become piqued at people's lack of honesty in retrospect.’
    • ‘He never touched her: until one night, piqued that he hadn't made a move, she climbed over the bolster herself.’
    • ‘The management finally took up the matter with the Housing Minister, M.C. Sampath, who apparently felt piqued at the official attitude.’
    • ‘It doesn't bother me now, but for years I have to say I was a bit piqued at the lack of ceremony surrounding my arrival.’
    • ‘He was a little piqued when I brought it back with a few bullet holes, the antenna shot off and one rudder cable severed.’
    • ‘One does attempt to make the government actually represent us by demonstrating and the like, but Aaronovitch seems to get piqued when people do that.’
    • ‘‘Play it yourself then,’ said Liszt, rising from the piano, rather piqued.’
    • ‘Broughan is hardly alone in feeling piqued at the dearth of vision amongst the suits at Queen Margaret Drive.’
    • ‘I was a bit piqued because I wanted to be known as the funny student.’
    • ‘However, what the promoters feel piqued about, is the brand value of Colorplus mentioned in the report.’
    • ‘Kelley, piqued, took her purse from him, setting the teacup carefully down.’
    irritate, annoy, bother, vex, provoke, displease, upset, offend, affront, anger, exasperate, infuriate, gall, irk, get someone's back up, disgruntle, nettle, needle, ruffle, get on someone's nerves, ruffle someone's feathers, make someone's hackles rise, rub up the wrong way
    View synonyms
  • 3pique oneselfarchaic Pride oneself.

    • ‘He piqued himself, indeed, upon his courtesy.’
    • ‘He piqued himself on being so with them more than with any one else.’

Origin

Mid 16th century (denoting animosity between two or more people): from French piquer ‘prick, irritate’.

Pronunciation

pique

/pik//pēk/

Main definitions of pique in English

: piqué1pique2pique3

pique3

noun

  • (in piquet) the scoring of 30 points on declarations and play before one's opponent scores anything.

    Compare with repique
    • ‘A player who scores 30 in declarations and play before his opponent scores anything gains a pique, which is worth 30 extra.’

verb

[WITH OBJECT]
  • Score a pique against (one's opponent)

Origin

Mid 17th century: from French pic, from the Old French sense ‘stabbing blow’, of unknown ultimate origin.

Pronunciation

pique

/pik//pēk/