Definition of pig-out in US English:

pig-out

noun

informal
  • A bout of eating a large amount of food.

    ‘a junk food pig-out’
    • ‘After all, Americans have been on a two-decade oil pig-out, gorging like oversized vacationers at a Vegas buffet.’
    • ‘Held in aid of Great Ormond Street Hospital and Oliver's Fifteen Foundation, it is an opportunity for a guilt-free pig-out.’
    • ‘Three normal-size meals every day - no post-ride pig-outs - and a midmorning and midafternoon snack.’
    • ‘It was like a three-month pig-out that made me better.’
    • ‘The corollary of the irresistible shift into autumn is the abundance of festivals in New England, celebrating everything from apple harvests and small-town pumpkin parades through to the full national Thanksgiving pig-out.’
    • ‘The festival seems to have mutated from a charming harvest festival to an annual beer and sausage pig-out.’
    • ‘The biggest misconception in endurance racing, says Knight, is the eve-of-the-race, carbo pig-out.’
    • ‘Rather, it's a good place to go for an affordable Chinese pig-out, and unlike some other places of its ilk, the food at Kam Han tastes fresh, not industrial.’
    • ‘We eat pancakes only once a year, as a luxury pig-out and as a precursor to 40 days of being good.’
    • ‘Not only have you been holed up for weeks but the season can seem like one long pig-out.’
    • ‘The whole time I was wearing this corset-thing to protect my back, which added a 3.6 degree of difficulty for a major pig-out.’
    • ‘I think this low score is because of the way I eat meat as an occasional pig-out, say, a piece of organic roast pork or a plate of bloody steak and chips, rather than as a regular weekday thing.’
    • ‘If I had really wanted to pig-out and take that double vodka, it would have cost just an extra £1. 40p.’

Pronunciation

pig-out

/ˈpiɡˌout//ˈpɪɡˌaʊt/