Main definitions of peter in English

: peter1peter2

peter1

verb

[NO OBJECT]
  • Decrease or fade gradually before coming to an end.

    ‘the storm had petered out’
    • ‘And there the story sort of peters out, I'm afraid.’
    • ‘Some films peter out purely on lack of effort in developing the main storyline.’
    • ‘That argument went in circles for a while before petering out in non-resolution.’
    • ‘Gradually Barcelona had petered out in that first half, Ronaldinho in particular.’
    • ‘By the end, however, the film sort of peters out, and the script falls apart.’
    • ‘We never get beyond a three-volley reply situation as conversation peters out after establishing that we're both fine and neither of us cares.’
    • ‘The communal disturbance continued for a couple of weeks before petering out.’
    • ‘In fact you can't - the road peters out at the Beacon, a white landmark on top of a cliff, which looks like a giant coasthouse.’
    • ‘The men in green will be disappointed with their performance as their smooth first half petered out in the second.’
    • ‘The events of their communities marking the passage of each year were petering out as young people left for the capital cities.’
    • ‘When the door shuts, conversation peters out, expressions sour, a drunk guy in a shiny shirt leans against the wall.’
    • ‘But when I looked up, further downstream, I could see the river narrowing, petering out.’
    • ‘A path petered out a few feet from my washing line at the back.’
    • ‘The ending peters out inconclusively in a welter of playful/sloppy metafictional games.’
    • ‘The game looked to be petering out to a drab draw, until Aidan McCarron, the flying Mary's full-forward, was wrestled to the ground inside the square.’
    • ‘But the movie doesn't really hold together; apart from the irritating visual style, the script really peters out and most of the performances are played way too broadly.’
    • ‘We then rewind through the previous stories, expecting everything to come together with a bang, but instead seeing each tale peter out in a whimper.’
    • ‘Elsewhere in the city, however, the convulsions of anarchy appeared to be petering out.’
    • ‘The ending, in particular, is a definite let-down as the script simply peters out in dialogue rather than concluding on the monumental bang Tarantino's been teasing us to expect all along.’
    • ‘I go for a run along a river path that quickly peters out and leaves me in an industrial zone.’
    disappear, vanish into thin air, be lost to sight, be lost to view, be invisible, become invisible, evaporate, dissipate, disperse, fade, fade away, melt away, evanesce, recede from view, withdraw, depart, leave, go away
    View synonyms

Origin

Early 19th century: of unknown origin.

Pronunciation:

peter

/ˈpēdər/

Main definitions of peter in English

: peter1peter2

peter2

noun

informal
  • A man's penis.

Origin

Late Middle English: from the given name Peter, applied in many transferred uses. The current sense dates from the early 20th century.

Pronunciation:

peter

/ˈpēdər/

Main definitions of peter in English

: peter1peter2

Peter

noun

  • Either of two books of the New Testament, epistles ascribed to St. Peter.

    • ‘The biblical scholar John Dominic Crossan dates the account of the passion within the Gospel of Peter to the middle of the first century C.E.’
    • ‘The purpose of this blog is to share and discuss info about recent New Testament research with a particular emphasis on 1 Peter.’

Pronunciation:

Peter

/ˈpēdər/