Definition of pervert in US English:

pervert

verb

[with object]
Pronunciation /pərˈvərt//pərˈvərt/
  • 1Alter (something) from its original course, meaning, or state to a distortion or corruption of what was first intended.

    ‘he was charged with conspiring to pervert the course of justice’
    • ‘He was later rearrested on suspicion of attempting to pervert the course of justice.’
    • ‘He does this by distorting and perverting our work and our intentions.’
    • ‘A high ranking police officer admitted to a court today that he is under investigation for attempting to pervert the course of justice and misconduct.’
    • ‘They've perverted the constitution, corrupted our institutions, made a mockery of our schools, a nightmare of our cities, destroyed the middle class.’
    • ‘Then I turned around to leave, silently vowing never to pervert justice again.’
    • ‘She was jailed for three years for trying to pervert the course of justice.’
    • ‘I was arrested on suspicion of corruption and perverting the course of justice.’
    • ‘Major alterations, like the insertion of stained-glass windows which pervert natural lighting effects, undermine this.’
    • ‘Police said a 22-year-old woman had been arrested on suspicion of wasting police time and attempting to pervert the course of justice.’
    • ‘Archaic structures that have been perverted by evil provide an excellent den for bats to live in.’
    • ‘The Government set out to pervert the Resource Management Act and its processes, simply so that Project Aqua could be started.’
    • ‘They are trying to pervert people's altruistic imperatives to make money.’
    • ‘He contended that, as a loyal servant of the crown, he had been honor-bound to rid the country of a detestable tyrant who had perverted French royal institutions.’
    • ‘A 15-year-old local youth was also arrested for allegedly attempting to pervert the course of justice and was released on bail pending further inquiries.’
    • ‘Bribery refers to the illicit use of rewards, gifts, or favors to pervert judgment or corrupt the conduct of someone.’
    • ‘There was no evidence that the doorman had conspired to pervert the course of justice, and no one had intimidated witnesses to the violent incident, he said.’
    • ‘And are formal charges now going to be laid against the officer concerned, or are perjury and attempts to pervert the course of justice only crimes when done without colour of law?’
    • ‘In effect, he argues that indiscriminate clemency for murderers perverts both justice and mercy.’
    • ‘Every natural and necessary thing can be perverted, even reason.’
    • ‘While they might look like portraits, or caricatures, of real people, they are actually archetypes and as such pervert the very essence of the miniature.’
    distort, warp, corrupt, subvert, twist, bend, abuse, divert, deflect, misapply, misuse, misrepresent, misinterpret, misconstrue, falsify, garble
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1 Lead (someone) away from what is considered right, natural, or acceptable.
      ‘Hector is a man who is simply perverted by his time’
      • ‘Ignorance perverts people and leads to wasted, counterproductive lives.’
      • ‘People like this are trying to pervert our own children.’
      • ‘For an article to pervert someone from contemporary moral standards it must, either explicitly or implicitly, be persuasive in its effect.’
      • ‘Alas his sojourn into being an op/ed columnist has totally perverted him.’
      • ‘To do so would make him as miserable and misguided as the persons perverting each other.’
      • ‘There's a point you reach before you're perverted and tainted by all the things that drag you into the music business, like avarice or a lust for fame.’
      corrupt, lead astray, deprave, make degenerate, debauch, debase, warp, vitiate, pollute, poison, contaminate
      View synonyms

noun

Pronunciation /ˈpərvərt//ˈpərvərt/
  • A person whose sexual behavior is regarded as abnormal and unacceptable.

    deviant, degenerate, debauchee, perverted person, depraved person
    View synonyms

Origin

Late Middle English (as a verb): from Old French pervertir, from Latin pervertere, from per- ‘thoroughly, to ill effect’ + vertere ‘to turn’. The current noun sense dates from the late 19th century.

Pronunciation

pervert

Verb/pərˈvərt/

pervert

Noun/ˈpərvərt/