Definition of persuader in English:

persuader

noun

  • 1A person who persuades someone to do something.

    • ‘Instead of using their powerful voice inside the system as persuaders for change, they were choosing exit.’
    • ‘The information age is developing into the age of anonymous persuaders.’
    • ‘Whether the professional persuaders were successful, or whether most doctors are lukewarm on the issue, we don't know.’
    • ‘He is one of the industry's best persuaders.’
    • ‘Have graphic designers shifted too much toward being persuaders rather than communicators?’
    • ‘As the events of the last few decades have shown, politicians are persuaders.’
    • ‘John is much more of a persuader, he leads by affection almost.’
    • ‘The rhetoric now divides the party between the converters and the persuaders.’
    • ‘With tactics such as definition, cultural persuaders create knowledge and effectuate control over that which they describe.’
    • ‘You know, critics on both sides want to say, you know, one candidate or the other isn't a good persuader.’
    • ‘The government will not be persuaders for unity.’
    • ‘She was a persuader and ‘sold’ her ideas to educators and parents alike.’
    • ‘The new leader must be a charismatic persuader, someone to whom others can relate, a person who can set sights higher than the next quarter's earnings report.’
    1. 1.1informal A thing used to compel submission or obedience, typically a gun or other weapon.
      • ‘Well, a gun can be used as a persuader whether it is actually fired or not.’
      • ‘A more concentrated effort is required here, as intimidation is not an effective persuader on these people.’
      • ‘It was an ancient practice to break a prisoner and force them to spill any knowledge they might have, starvation was a very powerful persuader.’

Pronunciation

persuader

/pərˈsweɪdər//pərˈswādər/