Definition of perpetuate in English:

perpetuate

verb

[WITH OBJECT]
  • 1Make (something, typically an undesirable situation or an unfounded belief) continue indefinitely.

    ‘the law perpetuated the interests of the ruling class’
    • ‘It depends on, and perpetuates, an eighteenth-century liberal ideal of autonomy, individualism and unencumbered choice.’
    • ‘The effect of its rate rise will be to perpetuate global economic imbalances.’
    • ‘The two men are understandably disgruntled and fault the shelters for perpetuating what they see as a system of control.’
    • ‘The financial oligarchy wants the war to continue to perpetuate their global wealth.’
    • ‘You are the last woman on earth, and it is your job to perpetuate the human race, whether you like it or not.’
    • ‘It's not just because a certain pool of skilled practitioners must be sustained to perpetuate our craft.’
    • ‘The people profiteering off of the growth perpetuate the problem and have a human obligation to correct the problems.’
    • ‘My question for Rosanne is what should we be doing to remember him, to perpetuate his memory?’
    • ‘Doing that simply legitimises and perpetuates continuing oppression.’
    • ‘The Mohegans are also invested in preserving and perpetuating their culture.’
    • ‘The fake images that concern us most are those that are created to perpetuate a lie.’
    • ‘He also continues to attempt to perpetuate those lies, but the public is beginning to wake up.’
    • ‘These systems are as useless today as the bureaucratic institutions that continue to perpetuate and promote their usage.’
    • ‘She couldn't let him keep perpetuating that process.’
    • ‘Building a theatre is not the easiest way of perpetuating your father's memory.’
    • ‘The effigies of antiquity were created to perpetuate the memory of the deceased as he or she looked while alive.’
    • ‘For protesters the present arrangement perpetuates gross global inequity, made worse by rampant globalization.’
    • ‘In this way we often perpetuate self-defeating subliminal beliefs.’
    • ‘Very few recognise the services of such freedom fighters or make efforts to perpetuate their memory.’
    • ‘The point in perpetuating a person's memory is that he or she might otherwise be forgotten.’
    • ‘The media has perpetuated four big lies in relation to this event.’
    • ‘Indeed inheritance under the current system only serves to perpetuate inequality.’
    • ‘It fittingly perpetuates his memory as one who lived an unassuming honourable life and bequeathed the whole of his residuary estate to charity.’
    • ‘The error in the second model is that the present situation need not perpetuate itself.’
    • ‘It has become a place that perpetuates and nourishes the precincts of power and violence.’
    • ‘Their memory was perpetuated in later centuries by antiquarians such as Joseph Strutt, whose Sports and Pastimes of England was published in 1801.’
    • ‘In spite of near-constant challenges to their survival, tortoises must nonetheless attend to the task of perpetuating the species.’
    • ‘These conditions destroy human dignity and perpetuate poverty.’
    • ‘Every year, parents continue to perpetuate the myth of Santa Claus.’
    • ‘It was on this sleepy island that the Dutch settled in 1609 and built a fort to perpetuate their memory.’
    • ‘Quebecers just don't want to swap their groovy ways to perpetuate the species.’
    • ‘The book contains unsubstantiated statements perpetuating old myths and creating confusion.’
    • ‘It assumes that changes are needed in the economic systems and structures that perpetuate inequality and injustice.’
    • ‘Some of those monuments are almost a century old and were erected to perpetuate a memory and a spirit dear to surviving family members.’
    keep alive, keep going, keep in existence, preserve, conserve, sustain, maintain, continue, extend, carry on, keep up, cause to continue, prolong
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1 Preserve (something valued) from oblivion or extinction.
      ‘how did these first humans survive to perpetuate the species?’

Usage

See perpetrate

Origin

Early 16th century: from Latin perpetuat- ‘made permanent’, from the verb perpetuare, from perpetuus ‘continuing throughout’ (see perpetual).

Pronunciation

perpetuate

/pərˈpɛtʃəˌweɪt//pərˈpeCHəˌwāt/