Definition of perp walk in English:

perp walk


  • An act of walking into or out of a police station, courthouse, etc., that a person in police custody is made to perform for the benefit of the media.

    ‘scores of high-ranking executives have been subject to perp walks’
    • ‘They also like to use women agents in the perp walk.’
    • ‘The perp walk has become an increasingly common and popular media phenomenon.’
    • ‘The women seemed acutely aware that the sentencing walk - like its predecessor, the perp walk - defines them in the public's mind.’
    • ‘He led a totally dysfunctional life and you see it in his famous perp walk.’
    • ‘Later the police paraded him in front of news photographers in a humiliating "perp walk."’
    • ‘You're real lucky you're not doing the perp walk right now.’
    • ‘He avoided a nationally televised perp walk by surrendering to Houston authorities on his own.’
    • ‘Despite the article being less than 50 words, the newspaper chose to accompany it with a photo of her, in her PJs, doing a perp walk down the stairs of our house.’
    • ‘They ticketed their car, their blocked their shots and they couldn't get what we call the perp walk going by.’
    • ‘Would we eventually see a bunch of central bank governors doing the "perp walk"?’
    • ‘After all, you don't have to look far to find a lot of MBAs doing the much scorned "perp walk."’
    • ‘Federal prosecutors arrested him on Apr. 23, and the world was treated to yet another capitalist perp walk outside a Manhattan courthouse.’
    • ‘One day after he was indicted by a grand jury in Houston and did the infamous perp walk.’
    • ‘He stressed criminal sanctions against corporate miscreants, a point driven home when a string of fallen tycoons subsequently did the "perp walk" before TV cameras.’
    • ‘That crook shouldn't be removed or censured, he should be cuffed and doin' the perp walk.’
    • ‘Let the perp walk start here.’
    • ‘A CEO no longer has to be photographed on a perp walk, handcuffs scraping cuff links, in order to get the boot; heads are now rolling for the slightest whiff of impropriety.’