Definition of performance in English:

performance

noun

  • 1An act of staging or presenting a play, concert, or other form of entertainment.

    ‘Don Giovanni had its first performance in 1787’
    • ‘The show follows the traditional plot of the fairytale story but with plenty of comedy and slapstick to keep the crowds entertained for both evening and matinee performances.’
    • ‘A few tickets remain for the matinee performance at 1.30 pm Saturday but the evening performance is sold out.’
    • ‘It is dedicated to presenting concerts and performances with a meaning.’
    • ‘The concert was the fourth in a series of evening performances organised by the Trustees during 2003.’
    • ‘There, pageants and performances could be presented against the authentic background of Clifford's Tower and the Castle Museum buildings.’
    • ‘The performances - matinees and evenings most days - will take place within the Tower's courtyards and its gardens near the main house.’
    • ‘All these elements work to infuse a strong sense of being present at the performance for the film spectator.’
    • ‘Its popularity in 1948 with both schoolchildren and adults saw the Blossom Street picture house bursting at the seams during matinees and evening performances for weeks on end.’
    • ‘Schools would have to apply for entertainment licences if any performances were attended by members of the public not directly associated with the school or its pupils.’
    • ‘The dancers present two performances a day - one at around noon and the other at around 8: 00 pm.’
    show, production, showing, presentation, entertainment, staging, act
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1 A person's rendering of a dramatic role, song, or piece of music.
      ‘Bailey gives a sound performance as the doctor’
      • ‘Back in the 17th and 18th centuries the only performances heard in complete silence were performances of sacred music.’
      • ‘The production includes a large cast with performances in music, dance, song and comedy.’
      • ‘At the same time it poses the most fundamental questions about what matters in a performance of a piece of music.’
      • ‘Dances and songs often accompanied the performances.’
      • ‘Although these veteran jazzmen take their music seriously, humor plays a role in their performances.’
      • ‘Four of these were for performers who gave an original performance of a well-known piece of drama or music.’
      • ‘Also included in the lineup was a jazz night and on Wednesday night music lovers enjoyed performances which fused classical and trad sounds.’
      • ‘Another commonality between the two stage divas is an emphasis on theatre standards as dramatic performances, not merely nice old songs.’
      • ‘I would like to thank the young people who worked to put on a wonderful performance of Sound of Music at the Wyvern.’
      • ‘When was the last time you sat down in your own home to listen to a full performance of a piece of music, with no other distractions?’
      • ‘Each disc contains three complete music performances, some of which we only see pieces of during the episodes.’
      • ‘It also includes songs and live music performances, although the core of the show is still the Irish folk dance.’
      • ‘When I visit on the last day of the symposium, the exhibition is accompanied by outdoor performances of songs and poems.’
      • ‘Though it took many years to establish the technique of sound on film, live music accompanied public performances.’
      • ‘As if that was not enough they also had to find a way to impress the judges with a two-minute performance set to a piece of music of their own choice.’
      • ‘Traditional recreation involves storytelling and performances of music, dance, and song.’
      • ‘His radical idea was that whatever sounds listeners heard during the performance constituted the music.’
      • ‘It features recordings of performances by the junior and chamber choirs and also instrumental music and solo performances by a number of accomplished musicians and singers.’
      • ‘Highly stylized dramatic performances were accompanied by music.’
      • ‘He has appeared as a chamber musician with many singers and instrumentalists and has taken part in first performances of many contemporary music pieces.’
      rendition, rendering, interpretation, account, playing, acting, representation, staging
      View synonyms
    2. 1.2British informal in singular A display of exaggerated behavior or a process involving a great deal of unnecessary time and effort; a fuss.
      ‘he stopped to tie his shoe and seemed to be making quite a performance of it’
      fuss, fuss and bother, production, palaver, parade, scene, display, exhibition
      View synonyms
  • 2The action or process of carrying out or accomplishing an action, task, or function.

    ‘the continual performance of a single task reduces a man to the level of a machine’
    • ‘How do you say it impairs their performance of their functions as judges?’
    • ‘Their use in Britain, moreover, was often confined to the performance of a single task.’
    • ‘The leader is a role model to the followers in respect of both task performance and ethical behaviour.’
    • ‘They require diversion of considerable assets from performance of principal tasks.’
    • ‘It is addressing a different realm of discourse, namely, performance of judicial functions.’
    • ‘Judicial immunity promotes independence by allowing the fearless performance of the judicial function.’
    carrying out, execution, discharge, conducting, conduct, effecting, accomplishment, achievement, completion, fulfilment, dispatch, implementation
    View synonyms
    1. 2.1 An action, task, or operation, seen in terms of how successfully it was performed.
      ‘pay increases are now being linked more closely to performance’
      ‘a dynamic performance by Davis’
      • ‘This will protect it against further market gyrations, but will hamper performance long term.’
      • ‘And that too maybe a very big contributor to why these kids are so good in terms of their mathematical performance.’
      • ‘Students believe that the College is hoping to improve academic performance during Michaelmas term.’
      • ‘Policing performance targets set by the Government are stifling officers' ability to do their job, a report claims.’
      • ‘Dublin remains a divided city in terms of academic performance.’
      • ‘They have been shown to enhance clinical performance in terms of drug dosing and preventive care.’
      • ‘I will measure performance in terms of achievement at the top line taking into account how much money we put behind the brands.’
      • ‘These drills are performed to develop cardio-vascular fitness and muscle power in terms of performance.’
      • ‘As learners, they may perceive a benefit in terms of application to performance in senior years.’
      • ‘While the market's not racing away, it has been fairly solid in terms of performance.’
      • ‘A lot of the key building blocks are now in place but have yet to pay off in terms of performance.’
      • ‘In terms of overall retail performance, there was no suggestion that the retail sector was in crisis.’
      • ‘The new franchise runs for eight years and nine months, with the final two years dependent on achieving performance targets.’
      • ‘Since improving health is the defining goal of the health system, we report performance in terms of that goal.’
      • ‘Studies have shown that private pension funds provide the worst performance - even in terms of what they deliver on the stock market.’
      • ‘The most recent tests proved very positive in both performance and reliability terms.’
      • ‘But local health chiefs were warned some of this extra money depends on them meeting tough performance targets.’
      • ‘Can the people afford to trust the group with its record of failure in terms of performance and financial management?’
      • ‘Police could lose money or be asked to resign if they don't meet strict performance targets set by the Greater Manchester force.’
      • ‘The report measures the three key performance targets, which many hospitals across England and Wales failed to hit.’
      operation, working, functioning
      View synonyms
    2. 2.2 The capabilities of a machine, vehicle, or product, especially when observed under particular conditions.
      ‘the hardware is put through tests that assess the performance of the processor’
      • ‘These products deliver outstanding performance year after year and represent the ultimate in quality.’
      • ‘It puts frequently accessed information into a high performance and a high capacity storage system.’
      • ‘Second, performance collapses very rapidly once the tipping threshold is exceeded.’
      • ‘By programming all functionality in the kernel, we can make gains in performance.’
      • ‘Will a slower speed device affect performance of a faster device if they are on the same channel?’
      • ‘The operator can notice changes in machine performance and handling to some degree.’
      • ‘Each organization will have its own tolerance level for speed and performance.’
      • ‘Not if you were raised on a steady diet of hot rods, muscle cars and performance vehicles.’
      • ‘A small weight penalty is well worth it for the performance and durability solution gained.’
      • ‘Instead, it will rely on factors other than a faster clock speed to improve the performance of its chips.’
      • ‘We tested to see if the increased performance met the theoretical speed boost.’
      • ‘The machines sharing the work usually come to have different performance capabilities.’
      • ‘This technology offers improved assay performance as well as speed and automation in one system.’
      • ‘The days of making huge gains in engine performance are behind us now.’
      • ‘The first involves tuning existing structural fiber products to improve performance.’
      • ‘Only the latter two speed up performance while simultaneously enhancing data safety.’
      • ‘With this development, significant gains in performance seem to be within reach once again.’
      • ‘Also, sealing was suspect, so performance dropped rapidly after use in the rain.’
      • ‘Technological advancements have delivered major gains in lighting performance.’
      • ‘In this way, administrators can balance not just capacity but performance as well.’
      functioning, working, operation, running, behaviour, capabilities, capability, capacity, power, potential
      View synonyms
    3. 2.3 The extent to which an investment is profitable, especially in relation to other investments.
      ‘unit-trust performance’
      • ‘If you can, you may choose to keep the endowment going as a separate investment and hope that performance improves but of course there is no guarantee.’
      • ‘Investors have to be careful when examining investment performance.’
      • ‘Returns also vary with the investment performance of the financial experts managing the funds.’
      • ‘Investment performance is dependent on fund managers making good decisions consistently.’
      • ‘Many investors first consider the investment performance of a unit trust before they actually buy units.’
    4. 2.4Linguistics An individual's use of a language, i.e. what a speaker actually says, including hesitations, false starts, and errors.
      Often contrasted with competence
      • ‘The notion is intended to replace his dichotomy of competence and performance.’

Pronunciation

performance

/pərˈfôrməns//pərˈfɔrməns/