Definition of peninsula in English:

peninsula

noun

  • A piece of land almost surrounded by water or projecting out into a body of water.

    • ‘Most of the mainland, however, is a peninsula of mountains, the highest being Olympus.’
    • ‘Now linked to the mainland by bridge, Skye consists of a series of peninsulas, each with its own sea loch, flanked by spectacular cliffs and little bays, many of which have their own white sandy beaches.’
    • ‘At river crossings, lakes, or narrow peninsulas, trails converge and funnel towards and away from caribou calving grounds and summer range.’
    • ‘In 1958, for example, there was universal praise for the building of the Mackinac Bridge which connects the lower and upper peninsulas in Michigan.’
    • ‘At this point a spit of land breaks away from the mainland to become the needle-like peninsula of Baja California.’
    • ‘The best visible and typical features are selected as landmarks: heights; visible road stretches; recognizable outlines of lakes, islands and peninsulas.’
    • ‘In mid-winter, the warm water around the Southwest peninsula seems to give them most lightning.’
    • ‘Outdoor activities may be limited, though, as there isn't a single river in the entire peninsula.’
    • ‘The island's 3,700 acres of tropical rainforest are a biological reserve that also includes five surrounding peninsulas on the Panama mainland.’
    • ‘They will even create artificial islands and peninsulas to increase the supply of land.’
    • ‘As a result of their dependence on thermal updrafts, most hawks tend to follow geographic features, such as mountain ridges and peninsulas, and become concentrated along these geographic features during the fall and spring migrations.’
    • ‘Just before we descend to the car park, I look out at the bay and a long peninsula of land pointing towards the East.’
    • ‘For the same reasons sanctuaries were sited at the tip of capes or peninsulas or on an island close to the mainland.’
    • ‘This may have resulted in extinction of some species and refuge for others, often in multiple glacial refugia on the Iberian, Italian, and Balkan peninsulas.’
    • ‘But there are myriads of other discrete territories, such as deserts, mountain ranges, peninsulas, and islands, that function as bioregions.’
    • ‘Livestock were ferried across to neighbouring islands, or herded together in remote peninsulas and mountain regions.’
    • ‘The coastal villages where the salt makers lived stand on islands or peninsulas of firm ground, with marshes and fens on their inland side and salt marshes on the seaward.’
    • ‘The lake was wide at this point, so wide the far bank was only a dim haze, and the water humped up in whitecaps in the middle where the peninsulas fell away and the wind hit it.’
    • ‘The most westerly point on the British mainland, the peninsula could not be further from China.’
    • ‘When we set off, the water was too rough for us to cross to the peninsula on the other side.’
    cape, promontory, point, head, headland, foreland, ness, horn, bill, bluff, limb
    mull
    half-island, half-isle, demi-island
    View synonyms

Usage

The spelling of the noun as peninsular instead of peninsula is a common mistake. The spelling peninsula should be used when a noun is intended (the end of the Cape Peninsula), whereas peninsular is the spelling of the adjective (the peninsular part of Malaysia)

Origin

Mid 16th century: from Latin paeninsula, from paene almost + insula island.

Pronunciation:

peninsula

/pəˈninsələ/