Main definitions of pelt in English

: pelt1pelt2

pelt1

verb

[WITH OBJECT]
  • 1 Attack (someone) by repeatedly hurling things at them.

    ‘two little boys pelted him with rotten apples’
    • ‘The Italians, including some of the world's wealthiest players, were pelted with tomatoes when they sneaked back home on a midnight flight.’
    • ‘At the protest, about 10 officers were surrounded by demonstrators as they tried to make an arrest, and were pelted with clods of earth torn from flower beds in a park and a wire garbage bin.’
    • ‘In other attacks homes have been pelted with pork products and bacon hung on doors.’
    • ‘It was almost like being pelted with rocks repeatedly.’
    • ‘And earlier this year, a lollipop lady nearly quit her job after being pelted with a drinks can, water balloons and a stick by students from the school.’
    • ‘Her friend kept pelting her with balled-up bits of paper to try and wake her up, but it wasn't happening.’
    • ‘In some cities firemen have been pelted with rocks and even attacked with fireworks.’
    • ‘I suppose the look would be epitomised by the finalist who emerges from a particularly disastrous exam to be pelted with eggs and glitter by an over-zealous congratulatory crowd.’
    • ‘In an explosion that left me temporarily deaf, the cannon stopped pelting us with energy and began hailing us with pieces of its debris instead.’
    • ‘The next time we performed these kids were pelting us with packets of cookies.’
    • ‘The Freeport bus has been pelted with stones and missiles hurled from the road and even shot at with an air gun, shattering a window.’
    • ‘The people in the audience, who usually spend halftime ignoring us or pelting us with peanuts, were hushed as they tried to figure out what we were writing.’
    • ‘Drunken youths had also pelted a 50-year-old woman's roof with empty beer bottles after she told them to be quiet last year.’
    • ‘Now before the farmers start pelting me with corn awareness pamphlets, let me say that there's probably nothing wrong with corn syrup sweeteners per se.’
    • ‘Unfortunately, I was pelted with hail as I ran for my car after a hardcore session in the library, so I'm in no mood to ponder the wonders of nature.’
    • ‘Hundreds of police officers took to the streets to tackle the baying mob, only to be pelted by petrol bombs and missiles.’
    • ‘I screamed back, taking the chance when he had his belly exposed to pelt him with cannon fire.’
    • ‘The officers were being pelted with missiles and were in serious danger.’
    • ‘‘There have been a few occasions now when buses have been pelted with missiles and windows have been smashed,’ he said.’
    • ‘He'd been left out of the reindeer games for so long, and now here Dad was, pelting him with missiles.’
    bombard, shower, attack, assail, batter, pepper, strafe, rake, sweep, enfilade, blitz
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1 Repeatedly hurl (something) at someone or something.
      ‘he spotted four boys aged about ten pelting stones at ducks’
      • ‘Many stones were pelted at my car as I waited to negotiate the roundabout.’
      • ‘If you're going to pelt rocks at somebody for this then you're an absolute moron.’
      • ‘From some fifty feet away, the original storyteller said he had pelted several stones at the presumably expired alien thing.’
      • ‘He is reported to have pelted two stones at his relative, who retaliated by stabbing him.’
      • ‘People staying in the house of glass are not expected to pelt stones at others' houses.’
    2. 1.2pelt down[no object] (of rain, hail, or snow) fall quickly and very heavily.
      ‘the rain was pelting down’
      • ‘I can hear the sirens as the rain still pelts down.’
      • ‘Rain pelted down on the roof like cascading pebbles.’
      • ‘Later in the night as I dropped off to sleep, I could hear more rain pelting down on the verandah, and I grumbled to myself about the washing that had been on the line since Wednesday.’
      • ‘Rain was pelting down and small puffs of steam were visible from everyone's mouth.’
      • ‘As the rain pelted down, two security guards together with the chauffeur struggled to manipulate the gate's intricate alarm system which was on shutdown.’
      • ‘The rain pelted down and pelted down and the raindrops smeared my glasses so I could barely see.’
      • ‘As rain pelts down onto the windshield, Tommy drives slowly towards their destination.’
      • ‘Then the rain came pelting down sending everyone running for the nearest bus shelter or shop doorway.’
      • ‘The climb would be difficult as the rain was pelting down constantly.’
      • ‘It was grey and miserable, the rain pelted down in sheets making it nearly impossible to see.’
      pour, teem, stream
      View synonyms
    3. 1.3informal [no object] Run somewhere very quickly.
      ‘I pelted across the road’
      • ‘He placed it on the floor, opened up a package containing assorted jingle balls, rolled one across the floor, and grinned as the little ball of energy went pelting after in hot pursuit.’
      • ‘Suddenly Zach came pelting through the hallway, shoving people out of the way until he accidentally ran into me, bowling me over.’
      • ‘He ripped off his shoes, shoving them in his belt, then pelted forward, knocking startled onlookers aside.’
      • ‘That insane bellow, practically in my ear, sent every naked, raw nerve ending in my body pelting for cover.’
      • ‘It was only for a brief second - a fleeting, rather sweaty contact as the teeny Canadian rocker pelted past my seat and down a tunnel of security men - but it was still a strangely magical moment.’
      • ‘My father raced past me, and I followed, pelting up the dock to where my mother had dived into the river.’
      • ‘He changed directions at an immense speed, and pelted off into the jungle, tearing through the undergrowth for his life.’
      • ‘We pelted for the door, mad-crazed with fear and hunger.’
      • ‘Tripping and stumbling in her haste, she raced up the stairs and pelted for her room at the end of the hall.’
      • ‘She suddenly came pelting in, colliding with her.’
      run, race, leap, sprint, dash, rush, speed, streak, shoot, whizz, whoosh, buzz, zoom, flash, blast, charge, stampede, chase, career, bustle, hare, fly, wing, kite, skite, dive, jump, skip, scurry, scud, scutter, scramble, hurry, hasten
      View synonyms

noun

archaic
  • An act of hurling something at someone.

Origin

Late 15th century: of unknown origin.

Pronunciation:

pelt

/pelt/

Main definitions of pelt in English

: pelt1pelt2

pelt2

noun

  • 1The skin of an animal with the fur, wool, or hair still on it.

    • ‘Wampum was prized by the Indians and used by the Europeans as currency in exchange for beaver pelts.’
    • ‘But humans also were smart enough to develop the ability to kill furry animals and use their pelts for clothing to be warmer.’
    • ‘Jay had been working as a furrier in Glasgow but he contracted a skin disease off the pelts.’
    • ‘It can be made from a variety of pelts and hides including leather, sealskin, mink, racoon, rabbit or pigskin in hundreds of different styles.’
    • ‘Today, they are raised as pets, for meat, pelts and wool, and for medical research.’
    • ‘In fact, anti-fur types be warned: animal pelts line all the beds (lending the rooms a subtle wet-doggy odour) as well as the movie theatre seats and bar alcoves.’
    • ‘I humbly suggest that the overall figure for full and part-time workers is around 85 people and that the majority of these are seasonal workers employed for a week or two at most to kill the animals and harvest their pelts.’
    • ‘White paint-chalk symbols were drawn over his animalistic pelt.’
    • ‘Courteous traders offered skins and pelts, robes and carpets.’
    • ‘One night, some guests spent the night there, sleeping on reindeer pelts.’
    • ‘It had fresco brick wall sides peaking upward as if inside a tent, there were tanned pelts of animal skins as tapestries on the wall.’
    • ‘His cousins Paul and Tom, sons of his uncle Tom, ran a tannery plant, which closed in recent years, although it is believed that the brothers still deal in hides, skins, pelts and leathers.’
    • ‘In the slap of waves against the rocky shore one can imagine hearing phantom brigades moving across the lakes, paddling in close line astern, their canoes piled high with beaver pelts destined for Bond Street and the rue de Rivoli.’
    • ‘He earned just enough for supplies by trapping animals and selling their pelts.’
    • ‘Giant pandas are also poached - killed illegally - as their pelt carries a high price in the black market.’
    • ‘When the first European settlers docked their ships here they weren't only enticed by beaver pelts.’
    • ‘In her brown hide robes she looked almost like a pile of animal pelts left heaped in the center of the room, but the sporadic rise and fall of her chest proved otherwise.’
    • ‘Normally, the glossier, smoother pelts from female bears are used for officers' bearskins, while other ranks are given hats made from the rougher pelt of the male animals.’
    • ‘Animal pelts have probably been exchanged in North America since the beginning of human habitation, but large-scale fur trade began only after the arrival of Europeans.’
    • ‘The first exploration of Canada's interior was for the purpose of finding beaver pelts to satisfy the obsession with fur coats by the European elite.’
    skin, hide, fleece, coat, fur, fell
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1 An animal's coat of fur or hair.
      • ‘Wearing a beautiful coat made of seal pelt comes as naturally as wearing clothes made from cow hide.’
      • ‘Threadbare patches in her fur and mane shone dull against the her tawny pelt.’
      • ‘Bengals, because they have pelts and not coats like domestic cats, shed very little, and cause less allergic reactions.’
      • ‘Their pelts can be made into fine bags, coats and hats; their fats have medicinal value.’
      • ‘The sun shone off his black pelt, and his silver mane glittered.’
      • ‘Extremely poor prices for nutria pelts have resulted in very little trapping activity.’
      • ‘Denizens of coastal waters in the Pacific, sea otters were pursued for centuries for their thick, soft pelts.’
      • ‘He grew into a strong, timber wolf with a thick, healthy gray pelt with brown patches on his muzzle, ears and tail tip.’
      • ‘At the base, there stood a black horse with a thick shaggy pelt and another dark grey one.’
      • ‘Before hitting our first night's camp, we visit a man training a magnificent eagle to hunt foxes, whose pelts are highly prized by Russians for coats and hats.’
    2. 1.2 The raw skin of a sheep or goat, stripped and ready for tanning.
      • ‘After the hair and fat had been removed, the tanner had to prevent the pelt from stiffening or rotting in one of several ways, as up to this point, it is white and very slimy and should be referred to as raw-hide.’
      • ‘Barely up to my shoulder, pale tan pelt, strips of white leather hanging in loops from her hips, rust-red curlicues dyed in the fur of her chest.’
      • ‘The defendants used a solvent in degreasing pelts at their tannery, which was located 1.3 miles from the plaintiffs borehole from which water was extracted for domestic use.’
      • ‘Opposite the fireplace, a bulky dark wood bed was draped in dark blue velvet covers and snowy white fur pelts, its sheets thrust to one side.’
    3. 1.3informal A person's hair.
      • ‘The attractiveness of this man made me think of him, with his similarly shaved dark-brown crown and shadow beard and nappy pelt of chest hair, and I started to grow angry again.’

Origin

Middle English: either from obsolete pellet skin from an Old French diminutive of pel skin from Latin pellis skin or a back-formation from peltry.

Pronunciation:

pelt

/pelt/