Definition of peloton in US English:

peloton

noun

  • The main field or group of cyclists in a race.

    • ‘As I said earlier, Australia has so many great cyclists in the peloton, yet there are only five slots.’
    • ‘There are a lot of professional riders from Australia in the peloton that are not sprinters.’
    • ‘That meant I had to race up front in the peloton all the time and had to react on every change and raise of pace.’
    • ‘The peloton had clicked into top gear from the very start on another baking-hot day in France.’
    • ‘He is off the back of the peloton and is receiving treatment from the race doctor.’
    • ‘And he will again be one of the leading sprinters in the peloton throughout the race.’
    • ‘I have not really had many opportunities to race in Europe, but I have against European pelotons in other locations.’
    • ‘With that in mind, we'll surely see a lot of these two pulling hard at the sharp end of the peloton in the days to come.’
    • ‘Riders use every available bit of road, dirt, sidewalk or grass to get to the front of the peloton.’
    • ‘The five riders were picked up by a chase group which detached itself from the sluggish peloton.’
    • ‘Like I said yesterday, my big goal was to make it to the base of the last climb with the peloton and I did.’
    • ‘In mountainous stages the peloton is likely to become fragmented, but in flat stages a split is rare.’
    • ‘From there, they will be given some rope off the front as the peloton rolls along at a comfortable speed.’
    • ‘The nine-man breakaway is finally caught by the first of the two pelotons with the second peloton around a minute back.’
    • ‘It is a week of racing that draws the most interest from spectators and media and is also the week of racing that hosts the strongest pelotons to race on North American soil.’
    • ‘A peloton turned loose on a long stretch of pavement is the essence of bicycle racing.’
    • ‘At the start, it was dry, but the peloton was bunched together and very nervous.’
    • ‘The U.S. team hoping to place a rider in an early breakaway, but the peloton did not let that happen.’
    • ‘You can tell when you see him in the peloton that he is just excited to be here and racing.’
    • ‘The relatively short history of American cyclists in the European peloton has worked to our advantage.’

Origin

French, literally ‘small ball’ (because of the concentrated grouping of the pack).

Pronunciation

peloton

/ˈpɛləˌtɑn//ˈpeləˌtän/