Main definitions of peep in US English:

: peep1peep2

peep1

verb

[no object]
  • 1Look quickly and furtively at something, especially through a narrow opening.

    ‘the door was ajar and she couldn't resist peeping in’
    • ‘There was a knock at the door so I got up and trudged to the door bitterly and peeped through the small windows.’
    • ‘I licked my lips and peeped through the hole, I couldn't help but giggle.’
    • ‘He walked slowly toward the door, peeped through an enlarged crack in the hinge side, and stepped back, startled.’
    • ‘Arin peeped through his fingers and then stood up with his jaw almost scraping his knees.’
    • ‘She peeped through the holes in the rock at the hundreds of wolves sitting and slouching or lying against the trees, looking at the rocks.’
    • ‘I drew back, and with Zev crouching behind me, peeped through the hole I had made.’
    • ‘We peeped through the window of an old-fashioned apothecary.’
    • ‘He walked across to the next room, delicately opened the door and peeped through.’
    • ‘Teenage girls were spotted around the village peeping through windows of some of the biggest homes, desperately hoping for a glance of Gareth.’
    • ‘Scarlet ran over to inspect as did Griffith and they peeped through to see Lane on the phone with someone.’
    • ‘I too peeped through out of curiosity and found a young house wife crying in front of a policeman.’
    • ‘Trembling, she peeped through her laced fingers at her stereo.’
    • ‘She peeped through the curtains at the two sleeping boys and ended up staring at them for a couple of minutes.’
    • ‘Despite his obvious contempt for anything celestial, I continued to peep discreetly into the astrology columns of newspapers and magazines.’
    • ‘I slipped into the house and into my room so as not to spoil their party, though I couldn't resist peeping through the blinds.’
    • ‘She locked the bullet into the barrel, peeped through the scope, aimed, and instantaneously pulled the trigger, expelling the bullet into the air.’
    • ‘William peeped through the curtained window into the dimly lit smoked filled room.’
    • ‘‘Don't worry, we'll think of something’ George said vaguely as he peeped through the curtains.’
    • ‘I peeped through the slits at the top of the door.’
    • ‘A head peeped through the small gap and greeted Julia with a booming voice.’
    look quickly, cast a brief look, take a secret look, spy, take a sly look, take a stealthy look, sneak a look, peek, have a peek, glance, peer
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1peep out Be just visible; appear slowly or partly or through a small opening.
      ‘the sun began to peep out’
      ‘a wad of money that was peeping out of his pocket’
      • ‘Anyway, on this occasion a different leaflet was peeping out of the box.’
      • ‘Spring in Connecticut brings rain and daffodils and tulips begin to peep out from piles of dirty snow.’
      • ‘We first noticed a beak peeping out from behind one of the beams and before we knew it the bird had tried to fly from the nest.’
      • ‘The sun peeped out from the clouds and sparkled on the water.’
      • ‘She saw the feeble rays of the sun barely peeping out into the sky.’
      • ‘His eyes traced over me, taking in my disheveled hair and my toes, which were peeping out from underneath my dress.’
      • ‘Grey pearl cuff links peeped out from beneath his jacket sleeves.’
      • ‘I regarded my toes as they peeped out of the water while I floated on my back.’
      • ‘Caroline could see that her toes peeped out from under the hem of her everyday gown.’
      • ‘And if at all the sun occasionally peeps out of the clouds, there will be large screens to provide shade to the plants.’
      appear, appear partly, appear slowly, show, come into sight, come into view, make an appearance, put in an appearance, present itself, present oneself, become visible, emerge, issue, peek, peer out, surface, loom, show its face, show one's face, come to light, spring up, pop up
      View synonyms

noun

  • 1usually in singular A quick or furtive look.

    ‘Jonathan took a peep at his watch’
    • ‘A quick peep at my watch told me that the time was 6.30 a.m. and across in the other bed, just visible through the mosquito nets, J.R. was still sleeping soundly.’
    • ‘A look at these beautiful products gives one an impressive peep into the artistic abilities of the strife-torn region.’
    • ‘The bigger kids said it was haunted so it was obviously too much of a temptation for any 10 year old not to take a quick peep through the window.’
    • ‘As he ripped at his shirt, he risked one quick peep through the car windows.’
    • ‘A glimpse of the rural lifestyle and a peep into the culture of various ethnic groups.’
    • ‘At midnight, street people drift to a Chinese temple seeking a peep into the future.’
    • ‘It offers a peep at the richness of the traditional gold jewellery of the State, which is also noted for its purity, creativity and craftsmanship.’
    • ‘New chaps would have a quick peep over the top, just for a moment - but only if they didn't know anything.’
    • ‘She actually couldn't pass the door without a quick peep inside.’
    quick look, brief look, sly look, stealthy look, sneaky look, peek, glance, glimpse, look, peer
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1 A momentary or partial view of something.
      ‘black curls and a peep of gold earring’

Origin

Late 15th century: symbolic; compare with peek.

Pronunciation

peep

/pēp//pip/

Main definitions of peep in US English:

: peep1peep2

peep2

noun

  • 1A high-pitched feeble sound made by a young bird or mammal.

    • ‘He let me know I'd woken him up with a little chirp, then once I'd settled down, he emitted another kitty peep.’
    • ‘I heard small chirps and peeps almost as soon as I stepped to the marsh's edge, but it required my vigilance to finally see what I'd been hearing - a Downy Woodpecker.’
    • ‘The little animal glanced back up at her but soon returned to its apple with a flippant peep.’
    • ‘He listened to the raucous calls of the bigger birds, the peeps and chucks of the smaller birds.’
    • ‘The parakeet flew up and landed on her shoulder with another peep, his little sounds were words that Nichol alone understood.’
    • ‘The call of glass frogs is a high peep (rather like that of fine crystal) or whistle.’
    • ‘First, it announces its presence at the far side of the pool with its distinctive, high-pitched ‘chirp’ call, which is more like a squawk than a peep.’
    • ‘It starts off with three or four high-pitched peeps in rather quick succession; then the bird launches into a raspy, guttural shriek; and then the bird whistles a few warbling notes as a coda.’
    • ‘New moms and dads everywhere respond to shrill baby peeps with excited nods and bows, carefully clearing away eggshell shards from around fragile hatchlings tucked between their feet.’
    cheep, chirp, chirrup, tweet, twitter, chirr, pipe, piping, warble, squeak, chatter
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1with negative A slight sound, utterance, or complaint.
      ‘not a peep out of them since shortly after eight’
      • ‘Look I can't promise not to say another peep about that boy you were with.’
      • ‘This was accepted with hardly a peep of protest from both the British and the American public.’
      • ‘But even more than this: not one peep of what I have told you about the sinister intentions of the church state would ever have been made public.’
      • ‘I tried ignoring the painful feeling and concentrated on not making a peep of sound.’
      • ‘On the one hand, we are led to believe that the girl is utterly self-reliant and unafraid; on the other, she slips into prostitution without a peep of protest.’
      • ‘And, I don't want to hear one peep from you about it either.’
      • ‘It was amazing, because there was not one peep from our closest geographical member of Parliament from the National Party.’
      • ‘When Hilmer hobbled the paper's budget, not a peep of protest from you.’
      • ‘The little girl was happily babbling and taking in her new surroundings with awe and she hadn't made a single fussy peep.’
      • ‘I really just didn't want to hear another peep coming out of her mouth.’
      • ‘Especially since we never hear a peep of complaint about the millions of dollars of research funded by the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada.’
      • ‘Vast swathes of ideological ground have been abandoned without a peep of protest from the grassroots nor a hint of rebellion or division.’
      • ‘We didn't hear another peep from them all week.’
      • ‘The press politely looked the other way, never uttering a peep.’
      • ‘But he offered not a peep of protest or criticism.’
      • ‘But they are doing this without a peep of protest from the fired-up grassroots activists who have taken over the Kansas Republican Party.’
      sound, noise, cry, utterance, word
      complaint, grumble, moan, mutter, murmur, grouse, objection, protest, protestation, outcry, demur, argument, remonstrance, remonstration, exception, grievance, cavil, quibble, word, sound
      View synonyms
    2. 1.2usually peepsNorth American informal A small sandpiper or similar wading bird.
      • ‘Its yellow legs distinguish it from the other two Washington peeps, Western and Semipalmated Sandpipers, which have black legs.’
      • ‘For the peeps and plovers dancing in the surf, we had no time at all.’
      • ‘The Semipalmated Sandpiper is a small shorebird in the group known as peeps or stints.’
      • ‘There were peeps, probably some types of stints, larger redshank sized birds and some Tringa species.’
      • ‘In the natural world, peeps are sandpipers, pure and simple.’

verb

[no object]
  • Make a cheeping or beeping sound.

    • ‘Quicker than a blink, she stuffs it into her claw, peeps once or twice, then picks it up again and eats a bit more, scraping delicately against the branch to push it into her mouth.’
    • ‘There will come a day three months from now when the sun is shining, the birds peep delight, the air smells rich and green, and I'll sigh in delight: again, again, at last.’
    • ‘The builder's lorry pulled up outside and peeped to attract my attention.’
    • ‘Outside their window, an insect's timid squeak peeped sporadically into the night, like a half-rusty hinge.’
    • ‘He jumped all over her shoulders and her head and sailed around her in circles, squawking and peeping his joy.’
    • ‘When you leap up every time he or she peeps, you're disturbing his or her sleep, the sleep folks say.’
    • ‘All the same, I can't help thinking that if only I could force myself to peep, burble and mangle my words like a child, I'd soon be able to communicate with the peoples of the world, or at least their kids.’
    • ‘It was hard work but I had a lot of public support with drivers peeping and the support from the firefighters has been fantastic.’
    cheep, chirp, chirrup, tweet, twitter, chirr, squeak
    View synonyms

Origin

Late Middle English: imitative; compare with cheep.

Pronunciation

peep

/pēp//pip/