Definition of patriarchy in English:

patriarchy

noun

  • 1A system of society or government in which the father or eldest male is head of the family and descent is traced through the male line.

    • ‘Overall male gain depends on the constant renewal of structures of male solidarity and patriarchy over-riding immediate economic or class interests.’
    • ‘The expression of patriarchy through male-surname dominance has robbed millions of women of their name identity.’
    • ‘Feminists now challenge patriarchy by tracing their descent through the female rather than the male line.’
    • ‘The movie now takes on a starkly different aesthetic as it turns its focus to blood feuds, family honour, and tyrannical patriarchy.’
    • ‘What is being asked for is a fundamental transformation of social systems entrenched deep within the system of patriarchy.’
    1. 1.1 A system of society or government in which men hold the power and women are largely excluded from it.
      • ‘For women it means fighting both religious and capitalist patriarchy.’
      • ‘These apply to the political and personal meanings that associate power with the nature of men and the culture of patriarchy.’
      • ‘I think the call for bras is successful because it is similar to the burning of bras in the seventies - each act being a response to male oppression / patriarchy.’
      • ‘No longer considered sexually scandalous, its analyses of patriarchy and its proposed antidotes to women's domination are still debated.’
      • ‘It was argued that patriarchy was a worldwide system which reduced women to the status of housewives and made them dependent on men.’
      • ‘Many women also face brutal exploitation in their families in third world countries, where patriarchy dominates and household labor is treated harshly.’
      • ‘In Europe, patriarchy flourished as institutions such as the family, the guild, and the university evolved to restrict or exclude women's presence and power.’
      • ‘Women and men exist as unequal political classes in the system of patriarchy, and so it is difficult to understand how love can truly exist between these two groups.’
      • ‘But see it for what it is-the product of a society steeped in competition, sexism, racism and patriarchy.’
      • ‘Feminists want to dismantle the patriarchy, she said.’
      • ‘Western feminism rests on the concept of patriarchy - the class system of male domination and female oppression.’
      • ‘Patriarchy is embedded in systems of education, healthcare, economic activity, social order and political representation.’
      • ‘The shrill feminist denunciations of male patriarchy share a common origin: the Marxist creed.’
      • ‘She did not shy away from the barriers she often faced as a result of publicly identifying the structure of male patriarchy.’
      • ‘What bits of patriarchy, or male dominance, remain in western society?’
      • ‘Gender seemed to be on the forefront of the discourse, largely because the organizers prominently recognized patriarchy as a main and integral force of oppression.’
      • ‘I am constantly trying to break free from the chains of male chauvinism and patriarchy.’
    2. 1.2 A society or community organized on patriarchal lines.
      • ‘But he's in a patriarchy where age counts so much.’
      • ‘Is it that these two patriarchies are uniting against a perceived common threat, free and independent women?’
      • ‘The play shows how, as usual in a patriarchy, it is the women who teach the next generation to submit.’
      • ‘The traditional Mongolian American household is a patriarchy in which the head of the household is the eldest male.’
      • ‘We don't have to live according to the rules of the patriarchy.’
      • ‘Many feminists argue that in patriarchies men maintain their power through violence and force.’
      • ‘Additionally, we must analyze collusion between foreign and indigenous patriarchies under imperialism in exacerbating women's oppression.’
      • ‘The traditional Albanian household is a patriarchy in which the head of the household is the eldest male.’

Origin

Mid 17th century: via medieval Latin from Greek patriarkhia, from patriarkhēs ruling father (see patriarch).

Pronunciation:

patriarchy

/ˈpātrēˌärkē/