Definition of passerby in English:



  • A person who happens to be going past something, especially on foot.

    • ‘Police believe the attack could have been witnessed by dozens of passers-by who failed to raise the alarm.’
    • ‘He sat in the doorway at 4pm on Friday so passers-by could witness the loss of his long dark brown locks.’
    • ‘Sometimes passers-by would wave dollars in his face, only to pull them away.’
    • ‘Calgarians thought it was a hoot, and passers-by steadily erupted into laughter.’
    • ‘But every time he ventures into the front garden he is mobbed by passers-by who want him to do their weeding as well.’
    • ‘Some passers-by were very amused at us, there was plenty of music and dancing.’
    • ‘Youngsters stood near the road, bearing small boxes to collect coins from passers-by.’
    • ‘They have also urged two passers-by who may have witnessed a man and girl near the scene of the incident to come forward.’
    • ‘Cars parked nearby were also damaged in the blast, and some passers-by were among the injured.’
    • ‘An area of Didsbury village was brought to a standstill as some passers-by grabbed wads of notes and ran off themselves.’
    • ‘We are urging passers-by to be observant and have an extra pair of eyes without putting themselves in danger.’
    • ‘Others handout leaflets, talk to passers-by, and do chalk outlines of the bodies of the dead.’
    • ‘The court was told Labour supporters stood on main roads trying to bribe passers-by to hand over their postal ballots.’
    • ‘It should prove highly convenient for many local people and indeed passers-by.’
    • ‘Manchester International Arts will be entertaining passers-by with a series of eccentric shows.’
    • ‘This beggar had been asking the passers-by to take pity on him but all had gone past the unfortunate creature.’
    • ‘And, yes, maybe they might have trouble interesting passers-by in the very same tracks.’
    • ‘A small crowd of neighbours and passers-by gathered at the Flaxley Road junction to watch the drama unfold.’
    • ‘It lies behind its gate, apparently oblivious of passers-by until they drop their guard.’
    • ‘As we walk past the High Court in Glasgow, passers-by call out affectionately to him and he returns the banter.’