Definition of participle in English:

participle

noun

Grammar
  • A word formed from a verb (e.g., going, gone, being, been) and used as an adjective (e.g., working woman, burned toast) or a noun (e.g., good breeding). In English, participles are also used to make compound verb forms (e.g., is going, has been)

    Compare with gerund
    • ‘Moreover, nouns express sorts of things, verbs and participles are tensed, pronouns are either demonstrative or relative.’
    • ‘The end of the previous sentence itself contains an absolute clause with the participle being as its verb.’
    • ‘We don't tell each other what we think about anything - except about how prepositions or participles or relative pronouns function.’
    • ‘Like participles, adjectives and also some idiomatic preposition phrases, when used as adjuncts, need an understood subject (or, it might be better to say, a target of predication) to be filled in if they are to be understood.’
    • ‘Intransitive, transitive, causative forms, past and non-past tenses (there was no future tense in Old Tamil), participal and verbal nouns, adjectival participles and the infinitive are found in the language of the inscriptions.’

Origin

Late Middle English: from Old French, by-form of participe, from Latin participium (verbal form) sharing (the functions of a noun) from participare share in.

Pronunciation:

participle

/ˈpärdəˌsip(ə)l/