Definition of pander in English:

pander

verb

[NO OBJECT]pander to
  • Gratify or indulge (an immoral or distasteful desire, need, or habit or a person with such a desire, etc.)

    ‘newspapers are pandering to people's baser instincts’
    • ‘So are cable news executives just pandering to the popular taste in order to get a bigger rating?’
    • ‘This strategy, admirable in its refusal to pander to European popular tastes, will of course never, ever, give Turkey a winning song.’
    • ‘Excessive gift-giving is now so entrenched in Hollywood culture that a company has been set up just to pander to the tastes of the A-listers.’
    • ‘The Government should not be pandering to public taste in the arts, but rather driving it.’
    • ‘This is clearly a personal project for all concerned and one which isn't interested in pandering to the masses.’
    • ‘It gets worse when you find out that the groups you've been pandering to can't stand one another.’
    • ‘It therefore made good economic sense to pander to popular taste and reaffirm the unique selling points of mainstream Indian cinema.’
    • ‘‘It is not the quality of the product that is at issue, it is the changing of a tradition to pander to different tastes,’ he said.’
    • ‘She tries to hold on to as much genuine stuff as she can while pandering to fancier tastes.’
    • ‘They have been replaced by a blackcurrant variety to pander to tastes beyond the county.’
    • ‘Perhaps this is an example of where pandering to the masses is not always as attractive as it intuitively seems.’
    • ‘This low price should ensure a high take-up, pandering to people's desire to look good and not worry about a comfortable ride.’
    • ‘But of course he was writing to satisfy his literary muse, not to pander to the base tastes of his public.’
    • ‘Hollywood is warned that the judge will no longer tolerate pandering to the masses.’
    • ‘And the politicians are going to try to raise money by pandering to these same players.’
    • ‘In the quest to satisfy the paying customers, sport has pandered to their wildest fantasies.’
    • ‘You can see the difficulty she's had now, where her opponent is framing her as pandering to minority interests.’
    • ‘It is music of absolute integrity, always sensitive to the tiniest musical gesture, and never showy or pandering to fashion.’
    • ‘Though most Italian films still pandered to the public, there was hope new auteurs would emerge and find support for their efforts.’
    • ‘Yet there are pundits who have dismissed his refusal to pander as pandering.’
    indulge, gratify, satisfy, cater to, give in to, fulfil, yield to, bow to, humour, please, accommodate, comply with, go along with
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noun

dated
  • 1A pimp.

    • ‘On her arrival in London the country wench of Michaelmas Term is immediately given the advice by her pander that ‘Virginity is no city trade’.’
    • ‘Figures representing the other three terms (Trinity, Hilary and Easter) enter, leading a ‘poor’ man who is made ‘rich’ as they present him with rich apparel, a page and a pander.’
    • ‘Fiesta also means ‘party’ in Spanish, and Trujillo's panders always tell the girls they are invited to a party.’
    procurer, procuress
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    1. 1.1archaic A person who assists the baser urges or evil designs of others.
      ‘the lowest panders of a venal press’
      • ‘Milton had no doubt that God, Divine Providence and History itself had willed that the saints prevail over the King and his Anglicans, panders and sycophants.’

Origin

Late Middle English (as a noun): from Pandare, the name of a character in Chaucer's Troilus and Criseyde (see Pandarus). The verb dates from the early 17th century.

Pronunciation

pander

/ˈpændər//ˈpandər/