Main definitions of pan in English

: pan1pan2

pan1

noun

  • 1A container made of metal and used for cooking food in.

    • ‘Fabric softener sheets are claimed to clean baked on foods from cooking pots and pans.’
    • ‘In an adjacent room, domestic workers dressed in aprons were sitting around a table decked with pots and pans for a cooking lesson.’
    • ‘To get started, coat a grill pan with the cooking spray and rub both sides of the steaks with the seasoning of your choice.’
    • ‘Holiday cooking pans and gadgets should be stowed in the attic, garage or in a closet.’
    • ‘Ticket holders have access to several stations where chefs prepare the food in woks and large sauté pans.’
    • ‘A number of cooking utensils, pans and cauldrons were also made of iron, with the consequence that these things lasted much longer and couldn't be burnt.’
    • ‘Sometimes my mother would be cooking and she'd just pack up the pots and pans with the food still in them.’
    • ‘It would not, however, make sense to sacrifice rare or expensive wines in the cooking pan.’
    • ‘Mrs Vale thought as she turned and rushed for the door that led outside, forgetting the cooking pan in her hand.’
    • ‘They are almost in darkness watching their blackened cooking pans.’
    • ‘On a main road leading north of Kabul, another refugee pushed a cart piled high with pots and pans, a metal trunk and a few tattered carpets.’
    • ‘I entered the kitchen and found Ryder humming to himself and saw that the aroma I had smelt was him cooking bacon in a pan.’
    • ‘All you really need is a couple of pans, a frying pan, a roasting tray, a couple of chopping blocks and a few decent knives.’
    • ‘Using nonstick pans or spraying pans with nonstick cooking spray will further reduce the amount of fat and calories added to your meals.’
    • ‘The rain banged hard and fast on my head like a small toddler drumming contently on a cooking pan with a spoon.’
    • ‘Take the excess oil out of the skillet and deglaze the pan with red wine.’
    • ‘As we indicated in our first article on basic kitchen needs, start with a good skillet or fry pan, a couple of saucepans and a sauté pan.’
    • ‘She could understand why they would need cooking pots and pans, rope, blankets, even the sword he had taken with him.’
    • ‘Place the chicken, skinned side up, on a rack in a roasting pan coated with cooking spray.’
    • ‘The kitchen was normal, he noticed, with all assortments of pots, pans, and cooking implements.’
    saucepan, frying pan, pot, casserole, wok, skillet, bain-marie, fish kettle, pressure cooker, poacher, chafing dish
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1 An amount of something contained in a pan.
      ‘a pan of hot water’
      • ‘In high school I used to make a whole pan of rice krispie treats and then eat the entire thing by myself in less than a half hour.’
      • ‘Bring a pan of water to the boil, then add the mangetout.’
      • ‘Marjorie, my sister, who does all my washing and cooking, had made me a pan of stew.’
      • ‘When it snowed she used to let us bring in a pan of clean snow and then we'd put Log Cabin Maple Syrup on it and eat it with a spoon.’
      • ‘At the age of three I managed to pull a pan of boiling milk over me.’
      • ‘Another pal is also making a huge pan of curry and chapattis.’
      • ‘I dine out three times a week, and the other nights heat up something with a pan of boiled vegetables.’
      • ‘In fact, aside from the occasional pan of seafood, Jonathan is virtually vegetarian.’
      • ‘He said the next thing he knew the boy had pulled the pan of hot fat over himself.’
      • ‘I felt old when I first made four pans of my dinner dish and walked two, covered with foil, across the street.’
      • ‘Two soldiers burst in with guns and they gave us a big pan of soup.’
      • ‘By the time Nick emerged from the shower I'd brewed tea, fried six sausages, a pan of bacon and was thinking about hot chocolate.’
      • ‘Jim motioned towards the pan of raw eggs waiting on the stove.’
      • ‘To clean an aluminum coffeepot and remove lime deposits, boil equal pans of water and white vinegar.’
      • ‘Clean aluminum coffeepots and remove lime deposits by boiling equal pans of water and white vinegar.’
      • ‘The first time I used it, it ungraciously bent at the handle and the entire pan of pasta that I'd just poured in got dumped into the sink.’
      • ‘The bustling activity grew into a flurry of skillets and plates as Corra joined the two other women and was swiftly put to work frying up a pan of bacon.’
      • ‘Afraid to argue further, Yeager went to fetch a bottle of whiskey and a pan of cold boiled beef, which Gallagher wolfed down.’
      • ‘I was so mad last evening I did what any reasonable woman would do - baked a pan of brownies.’
      • ‘Forget the tiny sprig strategically placed on a lemon sole or the meagre pinch of mint in a pan of potatoes.’
      • ‘I even peeled a pan of potatoes for the tea, which was appreciated, although it was remarked that some of them were a funny shape.’
      • ‘He was carrying a sack of hay for the donkey and a pan of hot black coffee for the driver.’
      • ‘She dropped by one afternoon when I was sick with a pan of brownies and a video tape with my favorite show on it.’
    2. 1.2 A bowl fitted at either end of a balance, in which items to be weighed are set.
      • ‘This is an interesting problem, since all we have is a bathroom scale and the small pan balance the kids have been using to weigh pennies and toy cars.’
      • ‘Setting aside 13 coins, you divide the remaining 26 equally between the two pans of the scale.’
      • ‘The price of tobacco was high, the purchaser getting enough leaf to balance the silver coins placed on the other pan of the scales.’
      • ‘But if she's blindfolded, how does she know which pan of the scale is heavier than the other?’
      • ‘We might imagine a scale with two balancing pans.’
      • ‘Also, I can remember the beam balance with its brass pans, agate fulcrum and box of weights.’
    3. 1.3 A large container used in a technical or manufacturing process for subjecting a material to heat or a mechanical or chemical process.
      • ‘The brine was evaporated or ‘walled’ in large, shallow lead pans, positioned over wood or coal fires, until a salt-rich sludge was formed.’
      • ‘In this method brine is boiled and agitated in huge tanks called vacuum pans.’
      • ‘For at least eight centuries, Prestonpans was home to industrial works where massive shallow pans were suspended over fire pits to boil sea water, creating salt used both to flavour food and preserve fish.’
      • ‘The resulting pans are rough-tuned before heating and fine-tuned after the firing process.’
      • ‘A common way to produce salt from brine is by evaporating the water using vacuum pans.’
      • ‘He walked drunkenly over the cabinet on the wall and picked up a pan used for grouping chemicals used in various experiments.’
    4. 1.4
      another term for steel drum
      • ‘‘Cello pans’ are played in sets of three or four; triple cello pans are tuned in diminished chords, and four-pan cellos in augmented chords.’
      • ‘Not their skills, but if they get a good drum, a better pan will result.’
      • ‘In a steelband, the melodies are played on a tenor pan, which can play a complete low pitch scale.’
      • ‘If you haven't heard Trini steel pan music, you are really missing something.’
      • ‘Her father was a steel pan tuner and her mother an accomplished violinist from the Royal Academy of Music.’
      • ‘The pan is a pitched percussion instrument, tuned chromatically.’
      • ‘To manufacture these pans, hundreds of thousands of hammer strikes were executed upon these drums.’
      • ‘Steel pan music is unique in both sound and your own personal perception of each individual song.’
    5. 1.5 A shallow bowl in which gold is separated from gravel and mud by agitation and washing.
      • ‘With a pick and shovel, and a pan to wash gravel dug from the riverbed, a prospector with no previous experience might gain more in one day than a skilled mechanic earned in a month.’
      • ‘Spring came, and they found a broad valley where the gold showed like yellow butter across the bottom of the washing pan.’
      • ‘His grandfather sifted gold from pans during Alaska's gold rush of 1896.’
      • ‘Mountain bikes and hiking boots have replaced picks and pans in this Gold Country town.’
    6. 1.6 A part of the lock that held the priming in old types of guns.
      • ‘These locks featured a round pan and a flat lock plate suitable for engraving.’
      • ‘I was using the cheapest powder down the barrel and in the pan.’
      • ‘Raising the weapon to his shoulder, he checks the pan, lock, and serpentine, wiping away any interfering sand and mud.’
      • ‘The upper segment of this wheel projects through a slot cut to its precise dimensions in the base of the priming pan.’
      • ‘The powder charge and the ball and patch had to be rammed separately down the tight-fitting barrel and the pan primed with powder.’
  • 2A hard stratum of compacted soil.

    • ‘On their lee sides some pans have clay dunes or lunettes composed of sandy, silty, clayey, and salty materials blown out from the pan floor.’
    • ‘If the soil pans have been created, it is necessary to break them by ripping the soil.’
    • ‘Permanent unvegetated salt pans with hypersaline soils are typical of upper marsh habitats.’
    • ‘If a farmer does not apply lime in his field, the application of fertiliser will be a sheer waste of time, money and labour as soils form what are known as hard pans and remain blocked.’
    • ‘‘We know what the strata of the soil is, but localised areas can hit hard pans,’ he said.’
    • ‘The corn roots grew in the loose soil above the tillage pan and down through the slot cut in a severely compacted tillage pan.’
    • ‘The roads are good, running either side of potato fields and regular cells / pans of water evaporating to produce salt.’
    • ‘The salt refiners extract high grade salt from approximately 3000 hectares of evaporative pans south of the lagoon.’
    • ‘Check for compacted soil layers or pans - these are the silent killers of high yields.’
    • ‘The open pan of the valley had no terrors for us in daylight.’
    • ‘This should be done when the soil is as dry as possible, and aims to break through any pre-existing hard pans and to open up the subsoil to facilitate rapid and deep penetration of the vine roots.’
    • ‘Notice the lack of soil structure in the tilled zone and good soil structure below the tillage pan.’
    hollow, pit, basin, depression, dip, indentation, crater, cavity, concavity
    View synonyms
  • 3US informal A person's face.

  • 4A hollow in the ground in which water may collect or in which a deposit of salt remains after water has evaporated.

    hollow, pit, basin, depression, dip, indentation, crater, cavity, concavity
    View synonyms

Phrasal Verbs

  • pan out

    • 1Turn out well.

      ‘Harold's idea had been a good one even if it hadn't panned out’
      • ‘Even if stem cell research pans out in the next 20-30 years, human cloning won't even be an issue for a whole lot longer.’
      • ‘Guess that plan didn't really pan out, but perhaps it would have succeeded if its masterminds used the power of rock to champion their cause.’
      • ‘It sure looks like an audacious gamble, if it pans out.’
      • ‘I'm holding off on further details until we see if this pans out, but I have it from a very good source.’
      • ‘I also told her that I'd be looking for full or part-time work shortly, so I'm hoping this all pans out.’
      • ‘If this pans out, it really is an outrageous piece of political malice.’
      • ‘If this report pans out, maybe it will be a catalyst.’
      • ‘I'm glad to hear this, and hope it pans out.’
      • ‘I'm still waiting to hear back from the other online job I applied for, but I'm hoping that pans out as well.’
      • ‘It may be that none of this pans out, but I think it's partially a reflection of the fact that there are so few states that are really in play on either side.’
      succeed, be successful, work, turn out well, work out
      View synonyms
      1. 1.1End up; conclude.
        ‘he's happy with the way the deal panned out’
        • ‘Before that, the game will pan out the way it pans out,’ he said.’
        • ‘We'll follow the legislation and how it pans out.’
        • ‘Anyway, we'll see how all that pans out in March.’
        • ‘It will be interesting to see how the role pans out.’
        • ‘Well, we'll see how the media coverage pans out as well.’
        • ‘But new demonstrations are called for today; we'll see how that pans out.’
        • ‘It'll be interesting to see how this one pans out.’
        • ‘If the rest of the year pans out in the same way as the first seven months, his forecasts will be out by £11 bn to £12 bn, putting the golden rule in jeopardy however the Treasury chooses to calculate it.’
        • ‘Green, speaking to the Sunday Herald last night, said: ‘We'll just have to wait to see how it pans out this week.’’
        • ‘The work will start again, and all being well it should be completed on schedule but we are waiting to see how the week pans out.’
        • ‘If it all pans out great, they'll really be able to crow.’
        • ‘Anyway, we'll see how it pans out and who he chooses.’
        • ‘We're biding our time to see how the radio consolidation game pans out.’
        • ‘I am interested in following how it all pans out for us.’
        • ‘I shall see how it pans out and what I shall write in the near future.’
        • ‘We are concerned about their level of training and powers they have been given, but we will have to wait and see how it pans out.’
        • ‘I think it's going to depend very much on how the global economy pans out.’
        • ‘It turns out to be a trap and the typical scenario pans out like this.’
        • ‘Well, to be honest, I would wait to see how the whole inquest pans out before judging anyone on that issue, including the driver and the photographers.’
        • ‘How that pans out, though, that's going to be a mystery.’
        turn out, work out, conclude, end, end up, result, come out, fall out, develop, evolve
        View synonyms

Origin

Old English panne, of West Germanic origin; related to Dutch pan, German Pfanne, perhaps based on Latin patina ‘dish’.

Pronunciation

pan

/pæn//pan/

noun

  • A panning movement.

    ‘that slow pan over Los Angeles’
    • ‘Occasionally, he allows himself the luxury of a slow pan.’
    • ‘The animators also overuse long pans over static backgrounds.’
    • ‘Very few camera tricks are employed; the DVD sticks mainly to head shots or middle shots of Bill with occasional pans across the audience.’
    • ‘Horrendous twitter and jaggies mar the three dimensional pans, which mask the disturbingly uniform trees and empty dirt.’
    • ‘Lock is a great way to prevent yourself from accidentally changing the scale factor with a misplaced pan or zoom.’
    • ‘The pacing is steady but slow, with slow blues and soul music matching the gentle pans and steady shots in the cinematography.’
    • ‘Thus the tense, often jarring interplay between rapid pans or other movement, and stationary close-ups.’
    • ‘Best of them all was the slow pan of 59 former Oscar winning performers, who were seated in rows of chairs on the center stage.’
    • ‘The full-frame picture isn't an annoyance; there's no sense of parts of the scene being lopped off at the edges, and there are no intrusive pans.’
    • ‘The camera continues its pan to the far wall of the tent, where a very unhealthy-looking girl is frothing at the mouth!’
    • ‘In addition, the spectator is given some delightful glimpses of archival footage of Old Beijing such as the pan across the Forbidden City.’
    • ‘A slow pan across and down stops on each one, names them and the awards they've won.’
    • ‘But there are also a certain number of slow lateral and circular pans, as well as more rapid views from a car moving through various villages.’
    • ‘The last bonus is a movie poster feature that begins with long, slow, close-up pans of the posters followed by a full-screen view.’
    • ‘As such I was expecting a film with minimal dialogue, long static shots, slow pans, and a plot centered around family dynamics.’
    • ‘This camera looks down on the city centre but has no left pan.’
    • ‘Next we move to the classroom where a slow pan reveals that the pupils are all chewing gum.’
    • ‘He uses tracking shots to physically connect his characters to one another and circular pans to visually illustrate his thesis.’
    • ‘Try to avoid very fast panning or very slow boring pans.’
    • ‘The rear soundstage gets play, but there are no directional pans.’

Main definitions of pan in English

: pan1pan2

pan2

noun

  • variant spelling of paan

Pronunciation

pan

/pɑn//pän/