Definition of pamphleteer in English:

pamphleteer

noun

  • A writer of pamphlets, especially ones of a political and controversial nature.

    • ‘And there were pamphleteers everywhere, each of them armed with a further supply, looking for hands to receive them and new places in which to post them.’
    • ‘The rule aims to control access by others to a meaning being conveyed as well as to control the ability of the pamphleteer to convey a meaning.’
    • ‘Newspapers evolved from the pamphleteers who considered themselves polemicists.’
    • ‘Then, like the pamphleteers of old, dozens of community radio stations plastered on-air broadsheets all across the country, translating regulatory gobbledygook into straightforward rallying cries.’
    • ‘I'm often jokingly comparing bloggers to pamphleteers of yore, but within blogging there are definitely some significant cases where people have a message to get out that can change the world.’
    • ‘Cantillon is widely interpreted as being a member of the mercantilists, an unorganized, difficult to define group of writers and pamphleteers who dominated public debate before the time of David Hume and the Physiocrats.’
    • ‘Here's an interesting article about how modern political debate resembles the pamphleteers in the early days of the US Republic.’
    • ‘I mean the pamphleteers and the sons of liberty who got right in the face of King George III.’
    • ‘I've often said that we are the heirs to the revolutionary war era's pamphleteers, only in electronic form and I proudly number myself amongst them.’
    • ‘We are at the beginning of a new age of online publishing - and I predict that this generation of online pamphleteers is just the first wave.’
    • ‘And fueling that divide were hundreds of newspaper writers and pamphleteers.’
    • ‘The Levellers were an informal alliance of pamphleteers and army agitators who emerged during the upsurge of political and religious freethinking unleashed by the conflict between Parliament and king in the 1640s.’
    • ‘He was a novelist, a critic, a journalist, a pamphleteer, an investigator and he also saw writing as a way of thinking about problems.’
    • ‘By the early 1780s, complaints had begun to mount; the Committee picked up where the pamphleteers and angry newspaper correspondents left off.’
    • ‘A pamphleteer by temperament, she knew that sedition and controversy are fired by printed matter.’
    • ‘Revolutionary pamphleteers denounced it as a resurrection of discredited feudal privileges.’
    • ‘The storytelling of the legal documents is replaced by the prefaces and narratives of the pamphleteers.’
    • ‘They are the historical descendants of Founding Fathers like Thomas Paine and other pamphleteers who contributed enormously to our democracy.’
    • ‘People who are marketing ideology as truth will eventually go the way of the pamphleteers, I suspect.’
    • ‘For all their utility as traffic wardens and deputised keepers of the peace, there are also the satgas that kidnap opposition pamphleteers, beat up journalists, and chase rivals down the main street waving machetes.’

verb

[NO OBJECT]usually as noun pamphleteering
  • Write and issue political or controversial pamphlets.

    • ‘Yet a superficial revival of radical pamphleteering hides what is really going on.’
    • ‘As more people become politically active, the greater the extent of partisan pamphleteering as opposed to more moderate discourse.’
    • ‘In other words, after three decades of debate and argument, demonstrations and denunciations, politicking and pamphleteering, nothing has changed.’
    • ‘But these are small blemishes in a splendid polemic in the best tradition of English pamphleteering.’
    • ‘Since his days in traffic court, Kyburz has continued pamphleteering against the establishment.’

Pronunciation

pamphleteer

/ˌpæmfləˈtɪr//ˌpamfləˈtir/