Definition of page-one in English:

page-one

adjective

North American
  • Worthy of being featured on the front page of a newspaper or magazine.

    ‘page-one news’
    • ‘Perhaps the most frustrating thing about the page-one appraisal is the lofty tone of the entire article.’
    • ‘Every big store appears to be struggling and Matalan, according to our page-one story, is about to confirm the trend.’
    • ‘I had a page-one story analyzing the previous day's school committee election that had to be written, and I was only about halfway through my list of people to call for that story.’
    • ‘A certain social ill might suddenly get a burst of national publicity because editors at the newspaper decided to make it a page-one news feature.’
    • ‘A search in Nexis, a news database, shows none of those papers carried a page-one story about the explosion.’
    • ‘On the other hand, the newspaper's editors have apparently decided the pre-meeting memo is page-one material right from the start.’
    • ‘He once told David Halberstam that the Washington Post was an exciting paper to read ‘because you never know on what page you would find a page-one story.’’
    • ‘Huge increases in tuition and fees in our colleges and universities have become page-one news.’
    • ‘Newspapers in the mid-1990s, after all, were pointing to increasing public interest in enlarged religion sections and page-one stories on spiritual trends.’
    • ‘I asked Downie how that works when it comes to page-one decisions - those seven stories each day that the Post is telling the country are the most important in the world.’

Pronunciation:

page-one

/ˌpājˈwən/