Definition of own in English:

own

pronoun & adjective

  • 1Used with a possessive to emphasize that someone or something belongs or relates to the person mentioned.

    [as adjective] ‘they can't handle their own children’
    ‘I was an outcast among my own kind’
    [as pronoun] ‘the Church would look after its own’
    • ‘But as you return to your own normality, spare a thought for those who cannot walk away.’
    • ‘Reducing barriers to trade and opening up our own economy to the free market would be a start.’
    • ‘I recognise people may have different points of view and are free to have their own opinion.’
    • ‘Making some sort of imposition on the players' own free time would also be a more appropriate form of redress.’
    • ‘Feel free to add your own sins, or just pile in and tell me what an awful person I am.’
    • ‘The best way to see its many attractions is to rent a car and drive from place to place at your own leisure.’
    • ‘He prefers to travel under his own steam, free of deadlines and the constriction of a commission.’
    • ‘Staff will be free to choose their own funds, but will otherwise be automatically opted in to a default fund.’
    • ‘Shouldn't businesses be providing their own opportunities in a free market?’
    • ‘The idea that it's better to be free to call your own shots, right or wrong, cannot be bad.’
    • ‘It is not, alas, possible to convince oneself that the kitten got there entirely of its own free will.’
    • ‘For my own leisure reading, I found that fiction gradually lost its hold on me.’
    • ‘Teenage louts always belong to someone else; your own are just boys being boys.’
    • ‘The other five of the same colour is not a trump - it belongs to its own suit.’
    • ‘Both her children work long hours and have little time to spare for their own home lives.’
    • ‘Plese feel free to add your own thoughts and questions, or just ignore my ramblings and move on.’
    • ‘Impossible as it is to believe, these are rappers who never mention their own names.’
    • ‘We'd be interested to see whether our readers' views concur with our own so feel free to make use of the comment boxes.’
    • ‘Given political independence, Scottish Tories would be free to set their own radical agenda.’
    • ‘If you cannot have it by its own total free will and volition, it will never be yours.’
    1. 1.1 Done or produced by and for the person specified.
      [as adjective] ‘I used to design all my own clothes’
      [as pronoun] ‘they claimed the work as their own’
      • ‘Instead we consciously fashion our own adaptations, from clothes to cars to weapons.’
      • ‘Once you've got all your cooking exams it's about experimenting and putting your own mark on a dish.’
      • ‘I once did a florist course at night school and I like to make my own clothes and do interior design.’
      • ‘She made her own clothes and always put her hair up in funky new ways.’
      • ‘As a bachelor who still mends his own clothes he was able to do a lot of embroidery on his square.’
      • ‘Without these berries, there is more of a need to do your own cooking and eat lots of food.’
      • ‘She creates her own prints, giving her clothes a distinctive signature look.’
      • ‘She has blasted celebrities who bring out their own clothes ranges.’
      • ‘To say there will be pots and pans for people to do their own cooking is just ludicrous.’
      • ‘As a child, Ismat was inspired by her mother, who used to make her own clothes.’
      • ‘You will also end up cooking all your own meals, because the food is disgusting.’
      • ‘So I'm going to have a crack at growing my own from scratch.’
    2. 1.2 Particular to the person or thing mentioned; individual.
      [as adjective] ‘the style had its own charm’
      [as pronoun] ‘the film had a quality all its own’
      • ‘I have invented a name for my own highly individual style of present wrapping.’
      • ‘On walking down busy Nevskii, for example, the individual's own right of way is all that matters.’
      • ‘Everyone thinks of themselves as an individual with their own individual thoughts and feelings.’
      • ‘You will soon realise each of these humorous birds has its own individual personality.’
      • ‘These were both aspects of her rich personality and the need to express herself in her own individual way.’
      • ‘People cope with grief in their own individual way but it does help to talk about it.’
      • ‘Ulverston is South Lakeland's second largest town and oozes its own character and charm.’
      • ‘Each cereal has its own needs, an individual moment of nurturing before the spoon starts scooping.’
      • ‘You should be aware of the deeper meaning of life and be practising it to your own individual perception.’
      • ‘In our own small ways we all made our own individual calls on the decision.’
      • ‘He has spent a lifetime trying, in his own individual way, to address some of the ills of our society.’
      • ‘Each of these sites has its own particularly charming stance on what I've said.’
      • ‘We bore in mind their own individual requirements but didn't do special favours for any of them.’
      • ‘There are many ways in which liberals respect individuals' claims over their own talents.’
      • ‘The machine is programmed to each individual's own unique hand characteristics.’
      • ‘You see, every person has their own individual tolerance to stock market volatility.’
      • ‘A stand that Alicia takes not just with her music, but also with her own individual style.’
      • ‘All the pubs on our route have their own individual atmosphere and characters.’
      • ‘This in turn fostered a new tolerance for women as individuals with their own destinies outside the home.’
      • ‘In schools what matters most is not how a child learns to develop his or her own individual abilities.’
      personal, individual, particular, private, personalized, idiosyncratic, characteristic, unique
      especial
      personal, individual, particular, private, personalized, idiosyncratic, characteristic, unique
      View synonyms

verb

  • 1[with object] Have (something) as one's own; possess.

    ‘his father owns a restaurant’
    [as adjective, in combination] ‘state-owned property’
    • ‘You never nurse the slightest notion of ever owning those clothes.’
    • ‘His hobby doesn't come cheap but, helpfully, his father owns a polo yard in Sussex.’
    • ‘Her father, who owns a bank, is reputed to be the wealthiest man in Spain.’
    • ‘He might have been working with gold, but his father certainly owned no golden goose.’
    • ‘They also have no problem with living with massive student debt as they start out their adult life, and they have no illusions about ever owning their own home.’
    • ‘He was installed in a pharmacy owned by his father on nearby Observatory Street.’
    • ‘She dropped them and looked about the room, trying to picture it as it had once been when her father's friend had owned it.’
    • ‘Having no means of his own, he has given up all hope of ever owning a nice home.’
    • ‘My father owned Cook's demolition yard just down from here and my eldest son was born there.’
    • ‘And just that morning, we had buried a childless woman who had lived 86 years without ever owning a car.’
    • ‘Ever fancied owning a stretch of a famous salmon river, but found yourself about a million quid short of the asking price?’
    • ‘His parents live in Kolkata; his father owns a portrait photo studio and his mother is a floral stylist.’
    • ‘It was here that he met his first wife Ann whose father owned a coalmine in West Virginia -.’
    • ‘Some would claim that he was born at Dougharne Hill where his father also owned another house.’
    • ‘My father owns a packaging company, and is also a sales representative for his company.’
    • ‘I know that deep down it wouldn't feel right in my heart, but it might just be the closest I ever get to owning a pair.’
    • ‘Her grandparents ran the old Savernake Forest Hotel and her father owned nightclubs.’
    • ‘My family haven't ever owned land and there isn't a farm anywhere which one day I'll inherit.’
    • ‘He said his father owned a light aircraft, which he was allowed to use.’
    • ‘None of my family or friends have ever owned big businesses or been corporate consultants.’
    be the owner of, possess, be the possessor of, be the proud possessor of, have in one's possession, have to one's name, count among one's possessions, have, keep, retain, maintain, hold, be blessed with, enjoy, boast
    View synonyms
  • 2formal [no object] Admit or acknowledge that something is the case or that one feels a certain way.

    ‘she owned to a feeling of profound jealousy’
    [with clause] ‘he was reluctant to own that he was indebted’
    • ‘Hume was quite well aware that Berkeley would not have owned to being a sceptic.’
    • ‘A man should never be ashamed to own that he has been in the wrong,’
    admit, allow, concede, grant, accept, accede, acknowledge, recognize, agree, confess
    View synonyms
    1. 2.1[with object] Take or acknowledge full responsibility for (something)
      ‘I emphasize the importance of owning our anger and finding ways to control it’
      • ‘Own your anger by expressing it with "I" statements: "I really get mad when you leave dirty dishes in the sink."’
      • ‘Just because you're scared of something now doesn't mean you won't own your fear in days to come.’
    2. 2.2archaic [with object] Acknowledge paternity, authorship, or possession of.
      ‘he has published little, trivial things which he will not own’
  • 3US informal [with object] Utterly defeat (an opponent or rival); completely get the better of.

    ‘yeah right, she totally owned you, man’
    • ‘So now I owned you so much to the point that you rely on using quotes from movies as comebacks instead of creating your own?’
    • ‘I owned you guys. Admit it please.’

Phrases

  • as if (or like) one owns the place

    • informal In an overbearing or self-important manner.

      ‘he would have walked in and taken charge as if he owned the place’
      • ‘If he walks up like he owns the place, he's probably going to treat women like property.’
      • ‘She walks around my apartment as if she owns the place and tells me what I can and can't do and the way it's going to be.’
  • be one's own man (or woman)

    • 1Act independently and with confidence.

      • ‘For the first time in a long while he found himself able to walk to the docks with his head held high, confident in the knowledge that he was his own man once more.’
      • ‘And he was his own man, unaffected by spin-doctors.’
      • ‘He looks tired but there is a sort of weary exhilaration about him: he may be floury and exhausted but he is his own man, producing food he believes in.’
      • ‘From the very beginning she made it clear that she was her own woman - election badges during her husband's 1992 campaign read ‘two for the price of one’.’
      • ‘They taught me self-respect and they showed me how to be my own woman - never to lie, never to lose my sense of humour and always to treasure my friends.’
      • ‘No longer constrained by the pressure of his work as a practising architect, he was his own man.’
      • ‘Gregory accepts the volatile nature of the industry but intends to be his own man and is confident of making a success of the job.’
      • ‘Now Russell, 48, is his own man and is beginning to exude a confidence and gentle humour that wasn't always to the fore when he was finance director.’
      • ‘In his early 60s, Luke was his own man and paid scant attention or heed to the conventions of modern day life.’
      • ‘I am in love with her because she is her own woman, lives alone, loves it and wouldn't have it any other way.’
      1. 1.1archaic Be in full possession of one's faculties.
  • come into its (or one's) own

    • Become fully effective, used, or recognized.

      ‘Mexico will come into its own as a vacation spot’
      • ‘On the other hand, their carnival costumes offered increasing evidence that St Lucia's designers are finally coming into their own.’
      • ‘This is a confident songwriter coming into her own.’
      • ‘He more fully came into his own in the '60s as the work of younger artists created a new climate for radical abstraction.’
      • ‘Flora fully came into her own after she was invited to join the Red Cross as a nurse and travel to Serbia in the First World War.’
      • ‘He is coming into his own now after being with the club for the last three or four years.’
      • ‘Remember when VCRs were just coming into their own?’
      • ‘Twentysomethings were defining their buying habits, coming into their own politically and were underserved creatively on television.’
      • ‘The last few years of his life he was coming into his own as an artist, creating some amazing art pieces and gallery shows.’
      • ‘It's about a girl coming into her own and becoming a woman.’
      • ‘It also shows a band coming into their own in the studio.’
  • hold one's own

    • Retain a position of strength in a challenging situation.

      ‘I can hold my own in a fight’
      • ‘If you become skilled, you'll hold your own in almost any situation.’
      • ‘And I always like the challenge of trying to hold my own with a fellow competitor.’
      • ‘Smith has good upper-body strength and held his own against some of the tougher tackles in the division.’
      • ‘Since he took up the sport he has always had to fight older children, but has managed to hold his own.’
      • ‘For one so young, she manages to hold her own against the old pro with an alluring combination of confidence and vulnerability.’
      • ‘Troy had about forty pounds of almost pure muscle on her but despite his advantage of experience and strength Kari was holding her own.’
      • ‘Having said that there are five strong personalities in the contest and I am confident that with good vote management we can still hold our own.’
      • ‘There is also the bonus that Scottish players are again beginning to hold their own in terms of quality.’
      • ‘Singing with her mother, Reshma's daughter also managed to hold her own by singing solo too.’
      • ‘He hangs in against tough lefthanders, so he can hold his own in late-inning situations against specialists.’
      stand firm, stand one's ground, keep one's position, maintain one's position, keep one's end up, keep one's head above water, compete, survive, manage, cope, get through, get on, get along, get by
      View synonyms
  • of one's own

    • Belonging to oneself alone.

      ‘at last I've got a place of my own’
      • ‘Even if you do not need to share it with others, you are justified in having one of your own.’
      • ‘If you feel you are being bled dry by monthly rent then buying a home of your own may be the solution.’
      • ‘Why not go into the garden today and see where you could introduce some eye-catchers of your own?’
      • ‘Piccadilly pays its way and has given all these young people an independent life of their own.’
      • ‘There is even a tattoo parlour out back just in case you get inspired and want a bit of flesh art of your own.’
      • ‘The result is an unashamed escape - guaranteed to lead you into dreams of your own.’
      • ‘A house of your own and a booty of gold are up for grabs in a new television game show.’
      • ‘The harder but surer way is to make a success of a business of your own and then sell it on to someone willing to pay millions.’
      • ‘You need to build up a life of your own for whatever the future may hold.’
      • ‘I think it's a good idea to have a platform of your own on which you can do what you want.’
  • on one's own

    • Unaccompanied by others; alone or unaided.

      ‘I have to do things on my own’
      • ‘It's easy to think that we're on our own and thus should go it alone and do the best we can.’
      • ‘Rome is a city for lovers, not for single 36 year men with beards who are on their own.’
      • ‘If you really want to make a change, start something on your own, show how it should be done.’
      • ‘As it is, the best advice is to dress in warm waterproofs, keep your eyes well peeled and see if you can handle it on your own.’
      • ‘Because, after all, our marriages and partnerships are far too important to manage on our own.’
      • ‘Now is the time to stop claiming we can recover on our own and seek professional advice and support from an external partner.’
      • ‘This Canadian joker couldn't tie his shoelaces on his own, let alone win a major title.’
      • ‘But it's hard doing stuff on your own all the time and I just want Abby to be responsible.’
      • ‘The former nurse is believed to have been single and to have lived on her own.’
      • ‘It was considered quite safe to travel on your own and come back alone even late at night.’
      alone, all alone, in a solitary state, single, solitary, unaccompanied, companionless, partnerless, unattended, unescorted, unchaperoned, solo
      unaided, unassisted, without help, without assistance, by one's own efforts, under one's own steam, independently, standing on one's own two feet, off one's own bat, on one's own initiative
      View synonyms

Phrasal Verbs

  • own up

    • Admit or confess to having done something wrong or embarrassing.

      ‘he owns up to few mistakes’
      • ‘If she owns up to her mistreatment, seems genuinely sorry and makes amends, you should have no problem setting the friendship back on track.’
      • ‘I was slightly disappointed at owning up, sometimes lying promises more fun.’
      • ‘We men have almost as much trouble owning up to our emotions as we do admitting to fear.’
      • ‘No one owns up to the fact of doing something wrong.’
      • ‘No government owns up to state-facilitated assassinations’
      • ‘Virtually everything these people said was wrong, but none of them has owned up to it.’
      • ‘Men who learn of their affliction are sometimes embarrassed to own up to it.’
      • ‘Both, understandably, want to talk about where they go from here, but they have to own up to what went wrong.’
      • ‘He figured out what was wrong and owned up to his mistake.’
      • ‘That was to his credit, as many people did the opposite and people should be encouraged to own up for their wrong doings.’
      admit to, admit guilt, plead guilty, accept blame, accept responsibility, make a clean breast of it, tell all
      spill the beans, get something off one's chest
      View synonyms

Origin

Old English āgen (adjective and pronoun) owned, possessed past participle of āgan owe; the verb ( Old English āgnian possess also make own's own) was originally from the adjective, later probably reintroduced from owner.

Pronunciation:

own

/ōn/