Definition of overstock in English:



  • Supply with more of something than is necessary or required.

    ‘do not overstock the kitchen with food’
    • ‘Don't overstock your pantry with grain products.’
    • ‘One of the items everybody got overstocked with is rubber-tired backhoes.’
    • ‘I looked forlornly past the celebratory bottle of champagne, consoling myself that it could be saved for New Years, and selected a bottle of Barbados dark rum from my disturbingly overstocked bar.’
    • ‘A few years later, British supermarkets were overstocked with green products that the same consumers later qualified as too expensive.’
    • ‘It means the warehouse is perpetually overstocked.’
    • ‘Sapient advised that there was no need to overstock commodity items like office supplies that can be obtained easily anywhere.’
    • ‘The retailer saved millions in distribution and warehousing costs as improved sales and order forecasts reduced the need to overstock in-house supplies.’
    • ‘Chilling: Don't overstock your fridge or freezer.’
    • ‘Producers would sell coupons one or two months before the Mid-autumn Festival and, based on the sales volume of the coupons, they could produce just enough mooncakes to avoid overstocking.’
    • ‘There would be penalties - today it is voluntary - where there would be penalties for failing to comply when they overstock the transmission lines with excessive electricity.’
    • ‘All the cake, chocs, biscuits and other fattening foodstuffs we tend to overstock on for Christmas.’
    • ‘In anticipation of higher sales, and due to poor forecasting, a gallery may overstock a particular item or resource.’
    • ‘The black topped bar stretched the length of the right wall overstocked with enough alcohol to satisfy anyone's needs.’
    • ‘But soon the rack was so overstocked that customers couldn't move the merchandise to see what was available.’
    • ‘In early 1999 the company suffered a setback following the discovery that its Glenmorangie Single Highland Malt brand had been overstocked in the UK distribution chain.’
    • ‘But it is not the interest of merchants and manufacturers… that the home market should be overstocked with their goods, an event which a bounty upon production might sometimes occasion.’
    • ‘The consultant finds that designer in-store shops ‘do a great job,’ but she adds that department stores still have too much inventory, and many times in-store units are also overstocked.’
    • ‘Did they overstock at the seaside tat warehouse then?’
    • ‘You see, it was her final request that Ralph should perform in a circus company, besides which all the zoos have indicated that they are presently overstocked with African elephants (of which Ralph is one).’
    • ‘There are, indeed, evidences that the market has become overstocked and that a considerable. number who are willing and anxious to work are unable to get occupation.’


  • (especially in a manufacturing or retailing context) a supply or quantity in excess of demand or requirements.

    ‘factory overstock’
    [count noun] ‘publishers' overstocks and remainders’
    • ‘By buying overstock and, since 1996, repressing classic recordings, the company has firmly occupied what remains a lucrative niche.’
    • ‘We've struggled to keep up and cleared out most of our overstock.’
    • ‘We found some good values at quite a few sites, sometimes at prices that look like the retailer is trying to get rid of some overstock.’
    • ‘I think she should take a very limited amount so she doesn't have a huge overstock on hand.’
    • ‘They carry overstock and clearance, so the same brand might even be available…’
    • ‘While book sales did not reach the level of the reader option, and the level of overstock was higher than in the author option (indicating a greater level of waste), the publisher's strategy maximized their overall profit.’
    • ‘Anyway, it's a really nice quality guitar, brand new (part of an overstock from a music fair, by all accounts), and it's great for noodling around on; just pick it up - no worries about leads and amplifiers and effects or whatever - and play.’
    • ‘Some 78 brand name stores offer overstock, out-of-season and even slightly faulty items at bargain prices.’
    • ‘What it says there, in the ‘model’ contract between publisher and author, is that, one year after a book has appeared, the publisher shall have the right to dispose of copies as a remainder or overstock.’
    • ‘Vendors also move many ‘remainders,’ publisher overstocks they obtain at 80 percent off the retail price, then sell to customers as half-price off bargains.’
    • ‘Toward the end of a book's life, before it goes into paperback, you end up with some overstock.’
    • ‘The answer, then, to keeping our second-hand bookshops in new stock is for our book distributors and publishers to let second-hand book dealers have access to their overstock.’
    • ‘In fact some manufacturers are selling surplus or overstock through eBay to open other channels of revenue without inflicting channel conflict.’
    • ‘Did some mascara factory accidentally make a batch too much and invent Goth to sell the overstock?’
    • ‘This has allowed the company to handle overstock from key suppliers internationally and supply specific packages of music products to non-traditional outlets such as bars, restaurants and clothes retailers.’
    • ‘Be on the lookout for warehouse sales on discontinued styles, samples and overstocks.’
    • ‘But when it came to matching Saskatchewan's contribution of beef overstock to food banks, the province considered it for two seconds before delivering an unceremonious, ‘We're not getting involved.’’
    • ‘Far from speculating on a price rise when demand picks up in the future, our retailer will put his overstock on sale when demand is weak.’
    • ‘Check stores that carry overstocks, closeouts and slightly dented items for great deals on storage racks and freestanding units.’
    • ‘Today, of course, the concept of selling remainder books has expanded to where you now have whole bookstores comprised entirely of overstock.’