Definition of oversteer in English:

oversteer

verb

[NO OBJECT]
Pronunciation /ˌoʊvərˈstɪr//ˌōvərˈstir/
  • (of a motor vehicle) have a tendency to turn more sharply than was intended.

    • ‘We kept the same set of tyres on for part of this afternoon's session, and by then the car was really oversteering, so as we put on a new set of tyres we also adjusted the set-up to make the handling more neutral.’
    • ‘This car in particular seemed to oversteer very badly.’
    • ‘His driving style has also matured, to the point where he now likes his car set up so that it responds immediately to steering inputs and tends to oversteer, or slide its back end.’
    • ‘It tended to oversteer and it shimmied like mad on descents.’
    • ‘Due to the resulting lack of downforce my car started to oversteer a bit.’
    • ‘‘The first practice was real difficult because the track didn't have enough grip, and we had a lot of problems with oversteering and traction problems.’
    • ‘But for sure we lost too much in the first two corners, the car was a little bit oversteering, it was quite windy and I think there was some grass also on the track, so I think it was not perfect conditions for my lap in the first two corners.’
    • ‘This was a car that understeered badly every time I went round one particular corner, and then - for no reason at all - would suddenly decide to oversteer.’
    • ‘But straight away this afternoon it was oversteering.’
    • ‘Practicing yesterday, I think we were running in front of people and the car was kind of oversteering.’
    • ‘If a car's rear tyres start to wear more than its fronts, it will begin to oversteer and the driver needs to be much more sensitive with the throttle - especially when exiting slow corners.’
    • ‘The race was going to plan until the last stint, when the car had less traction and was oversteering a lot.’
    • ‘However, it may be worth noting that a vehicle steered by its front wheels is less likely to oversteer if its centre of mass is well forward, so that most of the weight of the body is carried by the front wheels.’
    • ‘At speed, this reduces to concerns about whether the car drives too ‘tight’ or too ‘loose’ - tight meaning it is hard to turn, it understeers, and loose meaning it turns too much, it oversteers.’
    • ‘The second set of tyres was okay, but with the first and third set, my A4 was oversteering.’
    • ‘Project Gotham Racing: Looks fantastic, oversteering takes a bit of getting used to, the detail of say Leicester Square is close to photo realistic, most fun in multi-player mode with loads of nice touches.’
    • ‘EVO recently tested the car and said on one occasion it understeered, during the other it oversteered.’

noun

Pronunciation /ˈōvərˌstir//ˈoʊvərˌstɪr/
  • The tendency of a vehicle to turn more sharply than intended.

    • ‘The cars are configured for mild understeer, although you can turn that into oversteer quite easily if you twitch your toe in the middle of a corner.’
    • ‘However, it also can add lift-throttle oversteer to the mix.’
    • ‘This system uses all the features of the ESP but adds electric steering control to prevent oversteer and understeer as well as correct steering errors.’
    • ‘In fact the only times I ever got understeer were when trying to induce power oversteer, which of course effectively means using too much throttle for the turn.’
    • ‘It was a fine demonstration that taking a car by the scruff of the neck doesn't have to mean ten minutes of lurching, understeer and oversteer.’
    • ‘Regarding the handling, Michael says that the S1's chassis is so well balanced and sensitive that adjusting the dampers just one click from standard front or rear can switch it to understeer or oversteer.’
    • ‘With the extra weight all concentrated over the front wheels, there is a slight tendency towards oversteer.’
    • ‘Not a hint of understeer or oversteer could I find at my modest speeds.’
    • ‘When oversteer is present, the outside front wheel is decelerated to pull the nose outward slightly to keep the rear from overtaking the front.’
    • ‘This is an active safety feature designed to help prevent accidents by registering and helping to correct oversteer, understeer and loss of stability in the vehicle.’
    • ‘I lost almost a second of time due to oversteer at the entry of turn eight on my qualifying lap and that has resulted in only 11th place heading into tomorrow's decisive session.’
    • ‘The analogue sticks felt a little light for my liking - there wasn't too much resistance in the movement, making it a little prone to oversteer.’
    • ‘Neither car is particularly well balanced at this stage, but in Malaysia, we always need to tune the car set-up in order to counteract the fact that in high temperatures, the cars are inherently more prone to oversteer.’
    • ‘Jaguar's promotional video made it obvious that with the stability systems switched off the car is well up for some serious, tail-out, tyre-smoking power oversteer.’
    • ‘No matter what I did, it stayed very composed, pushing into understeer rather than oversteer.’
    • ‘My qualifying performance wasn't perfect as I had a short moment when I slid a little too much at the second to last corner due to oversteer.’
    • ‘Understeer is present in the dry, countered by progressive oversteer with right foot tickling.’
    • ‘After the diffuser was damaged, the balance was very unpredictable, switching from oversteer to understeer even in the course of a lap, and I kept asking to change it in the pits.’
    • ‘On my first set of tyres I had some understeer and that switched to oversteer with my second set which slowed me a bit.’
    • ‘The car can be driven on the throttle quite easily, with both understeer and oversteer smoothly quelled by your right foot.’

Pronunciation

oversteer

Verb/ˌoʊvərˈstɪr/

oversteer

Noun/ˈoʊvərˌstɪr/