Definition of overbid in English:

overbid

verb

[NO OBJECT]
Pronunciation: /ˌōvərˈbid/
  • 1(in an auction) make a higher bid than a previous bid.

    • ‘Media hype and too much wine at dinner may lead a wealthy collector to overbid for a work at auction (but there must have been an underbidder).’
    • ‘However, anecdotal stories are now appearing, suggesting that many people have figured this out, and overbidding for the sake of ‘winning’ is becoming less common.’
    • ‘Knowledge is power, and that way you won't overbid.’
    • ‘But this guy overbid me by something like 50% of my maximum bid.’
    • ‘On the other hand, in his determination to secure the property, he may overbid by a margin greater than necessary.’
  • 2(in competitive bidding, the auction in bridge, etc.) bid more than is warranted or manageable.

    • ‘So canny employers are often willing to pay the finest foreign talent even more than they pay local talent - not underbidding for foreign talent, as nativists fear, but often overbidding.’
    • ‘Work with a top-flight real estate agent who's seen several business cycles in the area, who can help you understand pricing trends there so you don't overbid.’
    • ‘‘Now our larger competition is overbidding prices like crazy,’ he says.’
    • ‘Presumably it is legal to expose an identical pair to begin with to make it more difficult for other players to overbid, or to overbid a single card directly with a triple, and so on.’

noun

Pronunciation: /ˈōvərˌbid/
  • A bid that is higher than is justified.

Pronunciation:

overbid

Verb/ˌōvərˈbid/

overbid

Noun/ˈōvərˌbid/