Definition of outcry in English:

outcry

noun

  • 1An exclamation or shout.

    ‘an outcry of spontaneous passion’
    • ‘The entire film is told in a surreal and dreamily clipped dialog of imaginably fashionable faux-period slang and bizarre outcries of passion.’
    • ‘Her voice yelled over the outcries of many enraged creatures.’
    • ‘It was then that they heard the outcries coming from further down The Deeps, as shouts carried through the dungeon halls.’
    • ‘If she flinches, makes an outcry and tries to get up from the sofa, don't worry.’
    • ‘I feel a religious force in my person, a species of prayer, something like an outcry.’
    shout, exclamation, cry, yell, howl, whoop, roar, scream, shriek, screech
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    1. 1.1 A strong expression of public disapproval or anger.
      ‘the public outcry over the bombing’
      • ‘Last month the death of a little boy caused a national outcry.’
      • ‘The policy did not last more than ten years, as the public outcry grew and more and more people disappeared.’
      • ‘What would you have done if the children had been taken into care but had been returned following a public outcry?’
      • ‘They were convicted and executed, despite a massive outcry from all over the world against this barbaric treatment.’
      • ‘There was a huge public outcry following the deaths in May because the bus had no seatbelts.’
      • ‘The outcry in the press would be tremendous!’
      • ‘And they have triggered a greater civilian outcry than almost any other weapon.’
      • ‘There he made statements, which have raised a massive and understandable outcry in the Italian press.’
      • ‘The video sparked a national outcry last week with commentators, including the Cabinet, labelling it racist.’
      • ‘But they were eventually given the green light, following a public outcry.’
      • ‘The outcry in the press was significant, and the resultant investigation into the incident was extensive.’
      • ‘The camp hit the headlines when scenes of destruction similar to damage after an earthquake sparked an international outcry.’
      • ‘Why hasn't there been a louder outcry about the measures adopted?’
      • ‘The company backed down and withdrew the T-shirt uniform after a public outcry.’
      • ‘I think the council has got the message that it can't just sell off areas which are sensitive like this without a public outcry.’
      • ‘In 2004 the then 77 year-old suspension bridge was closed to pedestrians, causing an outcry from local residents.’
      • ‘The resulting media outcry prodded the military to review its practices.’
      • ‘Can you imagine the outcry if English football fans were treated in this way?’
      • ‘The revelation has prompted an outcry from parents, legal experts and politicians who demanded further investigations.’
      • ‘When they did, however, the outcry was enormous.’
      complaints, howls of protest, objections, indignation, furore, clamour, clamouring, fuss, commotion, uproar, hue and cry, row, outbursts, tumult, opposition, dissent, vociferation
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Pronunciation:

outcry

/ˈoutˌkrī/