Definition of out on a limb in US English:

out on a limb

phrase

  • In or into a dangerous or uncompromising position, where one is not joined or supported by anyone else; vulnerable.

    ‘she's prepared to go out on a limb and do something different’
    • ‘I'll go out on a limb and guess there was nearly no such coverage in the US press, despite ample reason for self-criticism on our part.’
    • ‘I'm going to go out on a limb and say I don't think the perpetrators were embittered citizens or teenage vandals.’
    • ‘And he has a gentleman who is willing to go out on a limb for him.’
    • ‘As the movie came to an end, I was wondering if Payne was going to go out on a limb here and leave his central character in a worse position than at the start of the movie.’
    • ‘I like hearing the candidates from both parties go out on a limb and proclaim their support for America, apple pie and motherhood.’
    • ‘But if a manager ever decides to go out on a limb in pursuit of an unsecured position, then you probably won't hear about it until something goes wrong.’
    • ‘And while my dreams are never easy to analyze, I'm going to go out on a limb here and analyze what that dog represented.’
    • ‘We've all been tempted to push the envelope, go out on a limb, do something maybe not quite right just to put ourselves over the top.’
    • ‘In this instance, I'm going to go out on a limb and say that while Meryl makes some good points, she is grasping at straws.’
    • ‘But it's so lame it's funny, and the music is pretty cool, I will go out on a limb here and say this is a good power pop song.’
    in a precarious position, in a weak position, in a risky situation, vulnerable
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