Definition of orphanhood in US English:

orphanhood

noun

  • See orphan

    • ‘The estimates in Figure 7 show, for example, that the estimated probability of orphanhood for a twenty-year old child in 1900 was 0.0.37, meaning that slightly fewer than four percent of twenty-year-olds were orphans.’
    • ‘During the Long First Half of the Twentieth Century, one of the most important factors in the rising age of home-leaving was declining adult mortality, which led to declining rates of orphanhood.’
    • ‘Ill health can also be an important cause of poverty through loss of income, catastrophic health expenses, and orphanhood.’
    • ‘In some wars, family reunion is an urgent priority: through the use of tracing schemes the mass orphanhood in Mozambique has been largely absorbed by extended families and members of former communities or tribal groups.’
    • ‘From boyhood, he learned to keep his feelings to himself, repressing memories of his father and of the emotional impact of early orphanhood.’

Pronunciation

orphanhood

/ˈɔrf(ə)nˌhʊd//ˈôrf(ə)nˌho͝od/