Definition of order of the day in English:

order of the day

noun

  • 1The prevailing state of things.

    ‘confusion would seem to be the order of the day’
    • ‘In the old economy, where stability and predictability were the orders of the day, people with ‘relations’ in their titles proliferated.’
    • ‘More frequent and engaging spots might be the new order of the day.’
    • ‘On their return after the war they quickly realized that the simplicity of the art deco style was the new order of the day.’
    • ‘As for Sunday, hiding from the sun and cleaning were the orders of the day.’
    • ‘Rancour and hatred has become the order of the day.’
    • ‘They are almost too theatrical, and yet, since melodrama was the order of the day, perfect for the era.’
    • ‘In fact, using African American celebrities to endorse products or services is the new order of the day, and blacks who rate high on America's popularity scale are reaping the financial benefits of this trend.’
    • ‘Smoking, drinking, gambling have become the order of the day for these youth.’
    • ‘The Financial Index was down 139.05 points at 7896.54, as losses were the predominant order of the day within the sector.’
    • ‘And seriousness will be the order of the day.’
    • ‘Rebelling against one's own is the new order of the day.’
    • ‘The order of the day for the 2002 tour was to recreate the music as it appears on record, or as close as can be managed live; a tight, highly structured and disciplined approach.’
    • ‘His music harks back to a more innocent time, when heads-down, heart-on-sleeve rock was the glorious order of the day.’
    • ‘And their agitation didn't stop in the workplace; they also worked to elect their own candidates for public office-candidates who contested the laissez-faire order of the day.’
    • ‘Creamy concoctions plus classy retro Martinis seem to be the alcoholic orders of the day.’
    • ‘Whatever the reasons behind these dramatic changes, the abandonment of the interiors of the smaller ringforts along with the construction of rectangular houses and souterrains were the new order of the day.’
    • ‘But neglect has not been the only order of the day.’
    • ‘Surveillance and severe censorship were the orders of the day.’
    • ‘Celebration was the order of the day for Clare Chappelhow and her team of horses at Blackdyke.’
    • ‘The ensemble bend the rules of traditional early music performance - character, invention and sheer aural delight are the orders of the day.’
  • 2Something that is required or recommended.

    ‘on Sundays, a black suit was the order of the day’
    • ‘The flat court shoes I wore to match my work suit did not quite go with the dress-down order of the day.’
    • ‘A televised meeting at Sandown in the afternoon, featuring a £100,000 race, and a popular evening fixture at Beverley is the recommended order of the day for racing fans tomorrow.’
  • 3A program or agenda.