Definition of order in English:

order

noun

  • 1The arrangement or disposition of people or things in relation to each other according to a particular sequence, pattern, or method.

    ‘I filed the cards in alphabetical order’
    • ‘It highlights the top 10 Windows and top 10 Unix issues in their relative order of importance.’
    • ‘In interests of fairness, and to avoid any suggestion of judgement from me, the pieces are presented in alphabetical order.’
    • ‘Entitled That's Life, the book has been written to no orthodox chronological order or set pattern.’
    • ‘According to the evolutionary sequence, the biblical order of creation is all wrong.’
    • ‘The exhibition is organized in chronological order.’
    • ‘She shipped in a huge library of books and arranged all 600 of them into alphabetical order.’
    • ‘They serial numbers weren't in sequential order.’
    • ‘Three criticisms can be made of the present rules, which are as follows in ascending order of gravity.’
    • ‘A stroke can affect your ability to read and write and even if you can talk, sometimes the words don't come out in the correct order.’
    • ‘Legal requirements oblige voters to indicate a vote, in order of preference, to every candidate on the ballot paper.’
    • ‘Tobias shoved the first few books onto the shelves, not caring if they were in the correct order or not.’
    • ‘Most were lined up at the back of the desk, arranged in alphabetical order by author.’
    • ‘Dignitaries were seated in alphabetical order, according to their countries.’
    • ‘Houses are listed in descending order of price, but it is up to web users to discover this for themselves.’
    • ‘The choice of topics and the order of their presentation clearly received careful attention.’
    • ‘These activities and events are not listed in order of importance.’
    • ‘If there are no children and no spouse then parents, brothers and sisters, and more distant relatives roughly in that order will benefit.’
    • ‘First, write down your goals in order of priority and then set up a timeline to achieve them.’
    • ‘The author has selected and arranged the music compositions in order of complexity and structural content.’
    • ‘The names are in alphabetical order and first, second and third places will be announced on the night of the ceremony.’
    sequence, arrangement, organization, disposition, structure, system, series, succession
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1 A state in which everything is in its correct or appropriate place.
      ‘she tried to put her shattered thoughts into some semblance of order’
      • ‘One day I'll reorganise the sections into some semblance of order.’
      • ‘The law has to bring some order into the relationship between cyclists and pedestrians, which at the moment is in complete chaos.’
      • ‘A new approach might try to impose some order, codifying the rules by which Britain is governed.’
      • ‘Only from above, from a great height, can the logic, pattern and essential order of this garden be perceived.’
      • ‘The general atmosphere was one of businesslike order and purpose.’
      • ‘He had to create order and purpose in the midst of a terrible chaos.’
      • ‘Augustine saw order as the supreme manifestation of providence.’
      • ‘Nana's extreme love for order sort of explains my mom's fanaticism with cleanliness.’
      • ‘Cleanliness, punctuality, order and method are essentials in the character of a good housekeeper.’
      • ‘To study history means submitting to chaos and nevertheless retaining faith in order and meaning.’
      • ‘Unknown symbols flash past me as I look for a pattern, for underlying order beneath seeming chaos.’
      • ‘It is one of the least known, yet most powerful, devices for achieving pattern and order in the world.’
      • ‘By the time the Professor returned from the airport, all public areas of the house had been restored to a semblance of order and calm.’
      • ‘Thousands of commuters faced the prospect of trying to get home as the initial chaos gave way to some semblance of order by mid-afternoon.’
      • ‘The Victorians brought order to everything - scientific research included.’
      • ‘Never stop telling them how important it is that your home have a sense of order about it.’
      tidiness, neatness, orderliness, trimness, harmony, apple-pie order
      View synonyms
    2. 1.2 A state in which the laws and rules regulating the public behavior of members of a community are observed and authority is obeyed.
      ‘the army was deployed to keep order’
      • ‘I believe in order and justice. I believe that people are by nature good.’
      • ‘Their job was to secure public order through terror, intimidation and violence.’
      • ‘Octavian from beginning to end insisted on peace and public order.’
      • ‘Law, on the other hand, is a particular method of producing order.’
      • ‘When these efforts fail, city officials call in the military to help restore order.’
      • ‘To maintain public order, the authorities instituted a regular, salaried police force.’
      • ‘Because once the law goes order collapses and the rule of the gun or the bully prevails.’
      • ‘The real trick is to achieve order while upholding the rule of law.’
      • ‘For those with no respect or regard for law and order, such rules and laws are irrelevant.’
      • ‘Public order in the city is a matter best left to the authorities and the police.’
      • ‘Questions have been raised over the possible impact the promotion of the NPA would have on public peace and order.’
      • ‘Fistfights broke out in the hall and, for 20 minutes, police were unable to restore order.’
      • ‘It was enough that the rules invoked were imposed on all citizens for the protection of public order.’
      • ‘City prosecutors said they might charge the 21 with disrupting public order.’
      • ‘After police restored order extra patrols were put on the streets in the area to reassure the public.’
      • ‘As long as the public identifies order with law, it will believe that an orderly society is impossible without the law the state provides.’
      • ‘Insp Thomas, of Southend Police, said the extra officers would probably be used to keep order in the pubs and nightspots.’
      • ‘His country was occupied by Romans, and they had cruel methods of keeping order.’
      • ‘It is the duty of the courts to ensure that there is order under the rule of law.’
      • ‘They stand for order and the rule of law in an age when disorder and lawlessness are ever more widespread.’
      peace, control, lawful behaviour, law and order, law, lawfulness, discipline, calm, quiet, peace and quiet, quietness, peacefulness, peaceableness, tranquillity, serenity
      View synonyms
    3. 1.3 The prescribed or established procedure followed by a meeting, legislative assembly, debate, or court of law.
      ‘the meeting was called to order’
      • ‘The Lukhanji town council has adopted new rules of order to regulate the conduct of its council and committee meetings.’
      • ‘She banged her hammer, noting that the meeting was over and calling the court to order.’
      • ‘After the recitation of the Pledge of Allegiance, the meeting was called to order.’
    4. 1.4 A stated form of liturgical service, or of administration of a rite or ceremony, prescribed by ecclesiastical authority.
      • ‘Much of the music and order of service had been chosen by the Princess herself.’
      • ‘As I have been to many Evensongs since, the order of the service is now second nature.’
      • ‘The order of service has not yet been finalised but a police family liaison officer has been asked to read a poem during the service.’
      • ‘If you still have last year's order of service, please bring this along with you, as the hymn format will be similar.’
      rite, ritual, ceremonial, observance
      View synonyms
  • 2An authoritative command, direction, or instruction.

    ‘he was not going to take orders from a mere administrator’
    [with infinitive] ‘the skipper gave the order to abandon ship’
    • ‘So where did this order come from - government or senior management?’
    • ‘However Portugal was reluctant to stop trading with Britain, both for economic and political reasons, and Napoleon decided to send his armies to Portugal to force them to comply with his orders.’
    • ‘The president hasn't issued any orders along that line yet.’
    • ‘They resigned in the face of threatened reprisals if they defied a government order to return to work.’
    • ‘During World War II, a German army commander disobeyed orders to destroy the Ponte Vecchio.’
    • ‘She was at pains to stress that job losses and branch closures are hers to decide and are not based on orders from the Melbourne headquarters.’
    • ‘Kennedy moved quickly down the line shouting orders to fire and reload.’
    • ‘He is under strict orders to keep the subject of his investigation under wraps, but one could hazard a wild guess that it will touch on matters political.’
    • ‘Williams dropped his headset and grabbed his weapon, shouting orders the entire time.’
    • ‘He lives in Adelaide and has been under doctor's orders not to travel.’
    • ‘They are also worried that some soldiers opposed to the withdrawal will disobey orders to evacuate settlers.’
    • ‘Once they were airborne, James turned on his radio to receive any last minute instructions or orders.’
    • ‘Arrested in France on the orders of British intelligence, he then fled to Switzerland.’
    • ‘Against Henry III's orders, Guise marched on Paris.’
    • ‘He said they had no choice but take to orders from above.’
    • ‘The navy pilots had orders not to fire unless fired on.’
    • ‘The army, against orders, retreated south.’
    • ‘The commander bellowed the orders and the men rushed to do the his bidding.’
    • ‘Despite the doctor's order, she stood and went back to the window.’
    • ‘Nobody likes taking orders or advice from others.’
    command, instruction, directive, direction, decree, edict, injunction, mandate, dictate, commandment
    View synonyms
    1. 2.1 An oral or written request for something to be made, supplied, or served.
      ‘the company has won an order for six tankers’
      • ‘On the export front, the showcasing of the car in the Auto Mechanika last year has resulted in good export orders and enquiries.’
      • ‘Advance orders have now reached 1.8 million worldwide.’
      • ‘Just because a server is polite and brings you the correct order doesn't mean they deserve a tip.’
      • ‘Colin dialed up a local pizza parlor and put in an order for five large pizzas.’
      • ‘Unaccustomed to such efficient and personal service I placed my order at once, sat back and waited.’
      • ‘The books are destined to be bestsellers, with advance orders for over 400,000 already taken from booksellers nationwide.’
      • ‘With Christmas just around the corner, we are now taking orders for Christmas cakes and puddings etc.’
      • ‘Now the National Books website receives millions of hits and processes tens of thousands of online transactions and book orders each day.’
      • ‘The company expects orders to reach at least $2.5 billion for the whole year.’
      • ‘Last month the government confirmed an order for two aircraft carriers at a cost of £3 billion.’
      • ‘Online sellers also spend more money checking and processing orders.’
      • ‘A spokesperson confirmed that 40 to 60 people are to be employed on a short-term basis to meet production orders.’
      • ‘Now, factory workers place orders directly with suppliers via touchscreen computers at their work stations.’
      • ‘Jim guarantees that within three weeks of placing your order, the product can be delivered.’
      • ‘Once you're seated, the waitress promptly takes your order and then serves the dish.’
      • ‘The factory is the biggest local employer, and many other local industries depend on orders from the firm.’
      • ‘In the last week it has won orders worth more than £300,000.’
      • ‘The skinny waiter came back with the drinks and took our orders.’
      • ‘The waitress wrote down the orders and left with a smile on her face.’
      • ‘The shop was humming with activity as waitresses whizzed to and fro, taking orders or delivering desserts to the customers.’
      commission, purchase order, request, requisition, demand, call
      View synonyms
    2. 2.2 A thing made, supplied, or served as a result of an oral or written request.
      ‘orders will be delivered the next business day’
      • ‘I was told that their next order wasn't being delivered for another six weeks, and that I'd be better ordering it online myself.’
      • ‘The self-assembly furniture retailer said it was unable to deliver orders on time due to supply chain problems.’
      • ‘I left the house in time to prepare the orders and get them delivered.’
      • ‘After a tiring morning I come home and find that my postman had delivered my recent order from Amazon.’
      • ‘Customer service is also rated a top priority, with the company aiming to deliver 90 per cent of orders by the next day.’
      • ‘The book came today and was waiting on the kitchen table when Jill and I came in with six orders of well-done fried onion rings.’
      • ‘The fact is that the company is still losing about £4 every time it delivers an order.’
      • ‘We are busy sourcing new products and shipping orders.’
      • ‘A rise in the number of volunteers available to deliver orders has made it possible for the service to be extended.’
      • ‘In future, these businesses could lose big customers if they failed to prove they had appropriate plans to minimise disruption and ensure customer orders could be delivered.’
      • ‘It signed up its millionth customer in December, and delivered over a million orders in the run-up to Christmas.’
      • ‘We only deliver an order once the payment is cleared.’
      • ‘Suppliers are also left out of pocket when they think they are delivering high-value orders to a legitimate address and their subsequent invoices go unpaid.’
      • ‘However, the internet retailer has been dogged by claims that it left some customers without Christmas presents after failing to deliver orders on time.’
      • ‘The FTC takes a very aggressive stance towards retailers who fail to deliver orders on time.’
    3. 2.3 A written direction of a court or judge.
      ‘a judge's order forbidding the reporting of evidence’
      • ‘To defy a High Court deportation order, he took sanctuary in the Church of the Ascension.’
      • ‘The lawsuit has been put on hold by the administration order which protects a company from its creditors and gives it time to put together a rescue package.’
      • ‘He was acquitted on the orders of a judge on the grounds of insufficient evidence.’
      • ‘He said the group had a good case to mount a legal challenge to the administration order but would waive its right to pursue litigation once the deal was done.’
      • ‘Gray was sentenced to a psychiatric and community service rehabilitation order of three years.’
      • ‘The pair were given a shared custody order by a Pasadena court on July 27, 1999 with equal rights and duties.’
      • ‘I have not seen any order of the court with regard to Dr Smith, nor have I seen the court's judgment.’
      • ‘‘The government has always respected and executed orders of this Court,’ they wrote.’
      • ‘However, added the mayor, city hall will naturally respect the court's order, whatever it may be.’
      • ‘The above conditions may be varied or deleted by further order of the court.’
      • ‘He was also made the subject of a legal order, which forced him to refrain from any discussion whatsoever of the proceedings.’
      • ‘He was given a community service order and put on probation.’
      • ‘The court made no order for costs against the defendant.’
      • ‘If no other order of the Court is made tomorrow, I would expect that he will be released tomorrow.’
      • ‘He was sentenced to a 200-hour community service order and was banned from driving for 18 months.’
      • ‘The judge will pass sentence in the new year when the businessman will face either a jail term or a lengthy community service order.’
      • ‘A High Court judge made an order which will result in the twins being returned to Missouri in the United States where they were born.’
      • ‘They were released from custody over the weekend on the orders of a District Judge at Manchester Magistrates Court.’
      • ‘The judge will consider the confiscation order in relation to his recent convictions.’
      • ‘The government is expected to apply for a special administration order under the Railways Act in the High Court over the next few days.’
      arbitration, refereeing, umpiring
      View synonyms
    4. 2.4 A written direction to pay money or deliver property.
      • ‘The clearing banks' role in the payment and collection of cheques and other payment orders is directly related to one of their main activities, namely the maintenance of current accounts.’
      • ‘He was held to be in breach of fiduciary duty when he misappropriated funds from the company's bank account by fraudulently altering the name of the payee on a payment order addressed to the bank.’
      voucher, coupon, chit, docket, stamp, credit note, iou
      View synonyms
  • 3A particular social, political, or economic system.

    ‘if only the peasantry would rise up against the established order’
    ‘the social order of Britain’
    system, class system, hierarchy, pecking order, grouping, grading, ranking, scale
    View synonyms
    1. 3.1often orders A social class.
      ‘the upper social orders’
      • ‘They conclude that military service temporarily removed the young, labouring men who dominated the criminal orders, only to return them, duly brutalised, at the war's end.’
      • ‘As is well known, the months preceding the declaration of August 4 were filled with rancor between the commoners and the privileged orders.’
      • ‘The medieval manor therefore sustained the three orders of medieval society: those who pray, those who fight, and those who work.’
      • ‘The economic factors of renewed urbanization affected all orders of European society.’
      • ‘Concerned citizens became dismayed at the suffering among what they then called the lower social orders.’
      • ‘The magazine was clearly bought by those of the lower social orders who sought to improve themselves, and such people got little encouragement from most of the intellectual community.’
      • ‘They were by no means from the upper orders, these were street kids in Los Angeles.’
      • ‘Additional studies comparing how the war affected families of different social orders would undoubtedly shed more light on this question.’
      • ‘Such a vision certainly harked back to the Ancien Régime conception of a society of ranks and orders.’
      • ‘Those farmers who remained on the land became more militant, resulting in the loss of power by the old rural upper orders.’
      class, level, rank, caste, grade, degree, position, station, category
      View synonyms
    2. 3.2 A grade or rank in the Christian ministry, especially that of bishop, priest, or deacon.
      • ‘These two men struggled with the validity of Anglican orders and sacramental theology.’
      • ‘In the past we've split over such things as the punctuation of the creeds, the orders of ministry and the nature of communion.’
      • ‘I will look also at some intriguing hints that Rome may be reconsidering its position that Anglican ministerial orders are null and void.’
      • ‘The diaconate is a full and analogous order of ordained ministry to which both men and women are called by God.’
    3. 3.3orders The rank or position of a member of the clergy or an ordained minister of a church.
      ‘he took priest's orders’
      See also holy orders
      • ‘He became a monk and may have taken deacon's orders.’
      • ‘He was educated at Cambridge, took priest's orders, and became known as a preacher.’
      • ‘After taking orders in 1782, he became the perpetual curate of Barton-under-Needwood in 1783.’
      • ‘Watson had been ordained a deacon in 1856 and he took priest's orders two years later.’
    4. 3.4Theology Any of the nine grades of angelic beings in the celestial hierarchy.
      • ‘Angels, however, the lowest of the nine orders, do not have wings.’
      • ‘Hierarchies and litanies were emphasized: the nine orders of the angels, the Joys and Sorrows of the Virgin.’
  • 4A society of monks, priests, nuns, etc., living according to certain religious and social regulations and discipline and at least some of whose members take solemn vows.

    ‘the Franciscan Order’
    • ‘In the past the members of strict religious orders took the discipline as a matter of course.’
    • ‘He has attended several retreats at the abbey, run by the Catholic order of Benedictine monks.’
    • ‘Among the religious orders, only the friars had a vocation that by its very nature embraced the seriously poor and, indeed, the utterly destitute in the regular course of events.’
    • ‘For four centuries it was home to members of the Cistercian order, whose lives were dominated by manual labour and prayer.’
    • ‘Catholic schools tend to be run by religious orders, such as the Holy Ghosts, Jesuits and Loreto nuns.’
    • ‘The church might even consider limiting bishops to two five-year terms, as many religious orders do for their leaders.’
    • ‘In 1600 he went to Salamanca, where he joined the Franciscan Order.’
    • ‘Mersenne continued his education within the order at Nigeon and then at Meaux.’
    • ‘There are many private schools, run primarily by Catholic religious orders.’
    • ‘Luxembourg has also traditionally been the home of a great number of convents and religious orders, a number that has dwindled since the last century.’
    • ‘With the exception of some religious orders in which monks vow to live in solitude, most of us need other people to add texture to our lives.’
    • ‘A significant number of the monks have earned university degrees before joining the order.’
    • ‘Luigi Guido Grandi was a member of the order of the Camaldolites.’
    • ‘I joined the order as a First Degree member in October and have developed mixed feelings since then.’
    • ‘It expelled religious orders from the country and disestablished the Roman Catholic church.’
    • ‘He entered the Jesuit order in 1726 going to the Jesuit College in Piacenza in 1728 to teach literature.’
    • ‘Between the ninth and eleventh centuries the Benedictines and other monastic orders expanded across Europe.’
    • ‘Monks from the various orders in Europe had flocked to England to set up religious houses.’
    • ‘He considered joining a monastic order but was persuaded by his parish priest to enter the secular clergy.’
    • ‘In the 1200s, members of new religious orders, called friars, began to work among the people.’
    community, brotherhood, sisterhood
    View synonyms
    1. 4.1historical A society of knights bound by a common rule of life and having a combined military and monastic character.
      • ‘Only the strong leadership of John and the military orders saved the army at all; even so, thousands died that day’
      • ‘Feudalism was abolished along with the Inquisition and the Church's military orders, and two-thirds of monasteries and convents were dissolved.’
      • ‘Amongst the most famous of these crusader orders were the Order of the Knights Templar.’
      • ‘The Order of the Knights Templar was formed during the crusades when many knights and squires set out for the Holy Land.’
      • ‘The military orders, and the knights under King John put up a valiant defense and saved what they could of the army.’
    2. 4.2 An institution founded by a monarch for the purpose of conferring an honor or honors for merit on those appointed to it.
      • ‘The order became defunct with the death of its last knight, HRH The Duke of Gloucester, in 1974.’
      • ‘In 1998 he was awarded the Order of the White Eagle, Poland's highest honour.’
      • ‘He was made a chevalier of the Legion of Honour by his second country in 1896 and a commander of the order in 1933.’
    3. 4.3 The insignia worn by members of an order of honor or merit.
    4. 4.4 A Masonic or similar fraternal organization.
      • ‘The lobby in Westminster is believed by many to have been based originally on a Masonic order.’
      • ‘Freemasonry, though banned from time to time, flourished in Russia, and the Masonic orders had a wide range of members.’
      organization, association, society, fellowship, body, fraternity, confraternity, sorority, brotherhood, sisterhood, lodge, guild, league, union, club
      View synonyms
  • 5[in singular] The quality, nature, or importance of something.

    ‘with musical talent of this order, von Karajan would have been a phenomenon in any age’
    • ‘Her vibrancy, dramatic range and willowy elegance make her a classical ballerina of the highest order.’
    • ‘Talent of this order is rare, and I have a feeling that Paul is not through with surprising us.’
    • ‘It has more than adequate accuracy for that purpose and a high order of reliability.’
    • ‘The truth is that we are simply not good enough to beat a team playing rugby of a different order to ours.’
    • ‘The reality of this world is that there is nothing for free and everything of this order comes at a cost.’
    • ‘This is journalism of a high order in which the reporter creates a vista that involves the reader.’
    • ‘Science and technology can achieve impressive technological feats like going to the moon - but the real problems we face today are of a very different order.’
    type, kind, sort, nature, variety, ilk, genre, cast, style, brand, vintage
    View synonyms
    1. 5.1[with adjective] The overall state or condition of something.
      ‘the house had just been vacated and was in good order’
      condition, state, repair, shape, situation
      View synonyms
  • 6Biology
    A principal taxonomic category that ranks below class and above family.

    taxonomic group, class, subclass, family, species, breed
    View synonyms
  • 7Any of the five classical styles of architecture (Doric, Ionic, Corinthian, Tuscan, and Composite) based on the proportions of columns, amount of decoration, etc.

    • ‘The former asylum is a stately quadrangular building of stone with pillars of the Doric order.’
    • ‘The Pantheon in Rome is an ideal case study for understanding classical space, orders, composition, light, and character.’
    • ‘They reflect his keen appreciation of modern design, married with his admiration for classical orders.’
    • ‘Work out for yourself the differences between Corinthian, Ionic and Doric orders.’
    • ‘These columns are of different orders on each storey (Tuscan at the bottom, then Ionic, with Corinthian columns in the third storey).’
    • ‘The interior of Syon Hall has a Doric order with high attic and flat-beamed ceiling.’
    1. 7.1 Any style or mode of architecture subject to uniform established proportions.
  • 8Military
    [with modifier] Equipment or uniform for a specified purpose or of a specified type.

    ‘drill order’
    • ‘They normally wear Home Service review order dress as would have been worn on garrison duties and manoeuvres during the latter part of the nineteenth century.’
    • ‘Behind them, dressed in review order, marched the infantry of the British Army.’
    1. 8.1the order The position in which a rifle is held after ordering arms.
      See order arms below
  • 9Mathematics
    The degree of complexity of an equation, expression, etc., as denoted by an ordinal number.

    • ‘This integral was introduced in a paper on differential equations of the second order which he wrote in 1870.’
    • ‘In the study of differential equations his methods of lowering the order of an equation and separating variables were important.’
    • ‘The transient equations for the second orders of the identity coefficients are too complicated to solve.’
    • ‘His research was mostly on second order ordinary differential equations.’
    • ‘The predictor variables were entered in the same order for both equations.’
    1. 9.1 The number of differentiations required to reach the highest derivative in a differential equation.
    2. 9.2 The number of elements in a finite group.
      • ‘He examines orders of elements and proves (although not in this notation) that there is a subgroup for every number dividing the order of a cyclic group.’
      • ‘Cauchy had already proved that a group whose order is divisible by a prime p has an element of order p.’
      • ‘He received his doctorate for a thesis entitled Contributions to the theory of integral functions of finite order in 1929.’
    3. 9.3 The number of rows or columns in a square matrix.

verb

  • 1[reporting verb] Give an authoritative direction or instruction to do something.

    [with object and infinitive] ‘she ordered me to leave’
    [with direct speech] ‘“Stop frowning,” he ordered’
    [with clause] ‘the court ordered that the case should be heard at the end of August’
    [with object] ‘her father ordered her back home’
    ‘the judge ordered a retrial’
    • ‘His behaviour is said to have included regularly dressing down officers in front of other staff and ordering them to do menial tasks when they were tired.’
    • ‘Their commanding officer ordered them to stop because this was disrespectful.’
    • ‘The judge ordered an inquiry into the incident.’
    • ‘New chairman John Robinson has since ordered a review of compensation arrangements for senior managers.’
    • ‘Air marshals pursued and ordered the passenger to get down on the ground.’
    • ‘The judge also ordered the defendant to attend an alcohol awareness programme.’
    • ‘‘Stop the car!’ he ordered.’
    • ‘Brown was also ordered by the court to pay £250 compensation and £65 costs.’
    • ‘He was taken before a judge last Thursday who ordered that he be held in custody.’
    • ‘Just when he felt he could go no farther, his lieutenant ordered the unit to drop their 100 lb backpacks.’
    • ‘As the firefight continues, the commander orders his men to conserve ammunition.’
    • ‘Every person is hereby ordered to immediately evacuate the City of New Orleans.’
    • ‘The government responded by imposing a state of emergency in late November and ordering its regular army to fight the rebels.’
    • ‘Bosses at Metrolink have also ordered ticket inspectors to take a tough line against anyone caught without a ticket.’
    • ‘And Bingley magistrates yesterday ordered him to pay what he owed at a rate of £1, 000 a month.’
    • ‘The judge ordered that he and his family be placed in a witness protection programme.’
    • ‘‘Begin the treatment,’ the doctor ordered sharply.’
    • ‘Hartlepool magistrates yesterday ordered the forfeiture and destruction of the cannabis plants.’
    • ‘British commanders were so confident they ordered their troops to walk slowly towards the German lines.’
    • ‘Officers will have the power to order gangs of yobs to disperse or face arrest.’
    instruct, command, direct, enjoin, give the order to, give the command to, tell, require, charge, adjure
    decree, ordain, rule, legislate, lay down, dictate, prescribe, pronounce, determine
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1order someone around/about[with object] Continually tell someone in an overbearing way what to do.
      • ‘She'd realized that Paige had a way of making people do things her way without ordering them about.’
      • ‘You treat us as though we're nothing more than your lackeys; constantly ordering us around.’
      • ‘Despite being so much younger than her, he has a real public school cockiness and she loves the way he orders her about.’
      • ‘She resented the way the commander and his men ordered her around and treated her like a child.’
      • ‘Later, I saw him screaming at male crew members, ordering them about and obviously enjoying their subservience and the fact that they couldn't answer him back.’
      • ‘And then an officer walks by me and starts ordering me around.’
      • ‘The two boys take pleasure in ordering Johnny around.’
      • ‘At the same time, a new beefed-up universities quango will take on a far stronger supervisory role, and academic leaders fear this will lead to ministers being able to order them around.’
      • ‘She has, on repeated occasions, made my brother's life a misery by ordering him around like a kid and telling him off despite the fact that he's 29.’
      • ‘That was the other thing, Sonia never said please or thank you, as if my willingness to help somehow entitled her to order me around.’
      • ‘Look here Stevie, you don't order me around like that.’
      • ‘Don't you hate it when he orders you around like that?’
      • ‘I'm not ordering you around, it's just a suggestion.’
      • ‘You don't even know who we are, and you're ordering us around!’
      • ‘It seemed that he took much pleasure in ordering me around.’
      • ‘Being a juvenile, he'd have to put up with people ordering him around for another three or four years.’
      • ‘I don't think so Mrs. Lincoln, no one orders me around.’
      • ‘I'm as good as you are, pal; don't think ye can order me about just because I'm a waiter!’
      tell someone what to do, give orders to, boss about, boss around, bully, lord it over, dictate to, ride roughshod over, dominate, domineer, browbeat
      throw one's weight about, throw one's weight around, lay down the law
      push about, push around
      View synonyms
    2. 1.2North American [with object and complement] Command (something) to be done or (someone) to be treated in a particular way.
      ‘he ordered the anchor dropped’
      • ‘He ordered foreign investment and competition dropped.’
      • ‘Expressing concerns about vandalism, the landlord ordered the artwork removed.’
      • ‘They ordered the offshore funds returned to the United States.’
      • ‘The court ordered him dishonorably discharged and sent to military prison for ten years.’
  • 2[with object] Request (something) to be made, supplied, or served.

    ‘my friend ordered the tickets last week’
    [with two objects] ‘I asked the security guard to order me a taxi’
    [no object] ‘Are you ready to order, sir?’
    • ‘I went back to the bar to order the food, only to be informed that they finished serving food an hour ago.’
    • ‘She snuck a glance in the direction of the bar but Nathan was busy ordering their drinks.’
    • ‘I've just ordered a pizza to go and collect in 10 minutes or so.’
    • ‘The best thing about it was that if they didn't have a particular album, they'd order it for you from a catalogue.’
    • ‘She was 15 and alone in a country where she barely knew how to order a cup of coffee.’
    • ‘I ordered goods for delivery by a specific date, which has since passed.’
    • ‘Shoppers will be able to order groceries on the internet, then collect them at their leisure.’
    • ‘I almost always order a grilled sole served with green beans or spinach.’
    • ‘She ordered the lobster, crab and prawn terrine.’
    • ‘I ordered it out of the catalog two weeks ago and I haven't heard a word about it since.’
    • ‘The waitress comes along to see if we would like to order a drink and he perused the wine list.’
    • ‘The director promptly ordered a glass of kir royale, and we followed his lead.’
    • ‘In a nutshell, if you want to stay in the business, all your guests have to be treated like VIPs - not just the ones ordering champagne and foie gras.’
    • ‘I order shoes straight from Manolo Blahnik, or I buy them from Harrods.’
    • ‘When the maître d' took them to their table, Trent immediately ordered a bottle of red wine.’
    • ‘It is always a good sign when there is so much you want to taste that you have great trouble deciding what to order.’
    • ‘He likes to be able to get by in new countries, and where better to start than to learn how to order drinks in bars?’
    • ‘Jen had just ordered her pizza and went outside to enjoy the cold February air.’
    • ‘As we were waiting for our food, we decided to order a few pitchers of beer to pass the time.’
    • ‘Five hundred copies have already been ordered in advance.’
    request, apply for, send away for, send off for, write off for, put in an order for, place an order for, requisition
    View synonyms
  • 3[with object] Arrange (something) in a methodical or appropriate way.

    ‘all entries are ordered by date’
    [as adjectivein combination] ‘her normally well-ordered life’
    • ‘It's in alphabetical order, because ordering them by preference would just be too difficult.’
    • ‘In fact one of the characteristics of Dietrich as a thinker is the systematic way in which he not only orders his thoughts but his treatises as well.’
    • ‘As his previously well-ordered life slips away from him he loses control and his judgement deserts him.’
    • ‘She sat on the edge of her bed, trying to order her thoughts.’
    • ‘I have to order my notes once, twice, three times before I can start actually using them.’
    • ‘Jenny admits that with two small children, she has to order her time very carefully.’
    • ‘The exhibition catalogue is ordered by the artists' dates of birth.’
    organize, put in order, set in order, arrange, sort out, straighten out, marshal, dispose, lay out, regulate
    View synonyms

Phrases

  • by order of

    • According to directions given by the proper authority.

      ‘he was released from prison by order of the court’
      • ‘Captain Leghorn, after registering five missions, was grounded by order of higher headquarters until after D-Day.’
      • ‘The Government must create a new wetland on the east coast by order of the European Court to replace two lost to development in Kent and Suffolk.’
      • ‘The accused were brought from Lancaster to Barrow by order of the Home Secretary.’
      • ‘Children under the care of a local authority by voluntary agreement or by order of a court often have poor physical and mental health.’
      • ‘In 2001, the company started firing union members by order of the government.’
      • ‘His microphone had been switched off, by order of the bench, but he carried on speaking.’
      • ‘Services will be curtailed while fire doors are replaced, by order of the Health and Safety Authority.’
      • ‘If the child is in care by order of a Court then it is the Court and local authority who make the decisions about who the child can see.’
      • ‘I am writing this in Brussels on a Sunday when no private cars are allowed in the streets, by order.’
      • ‘He was released by order of an examining magistrate on 30 June after 44 days without access to judicial review or to his family or lawyer.’
  • in order

    • 1According to a particular sequence.

      • ‘Although the stages of grief are described, they don't progress in order.’
      • ‘As a historian, she can put things in order, illuminate the past and maybe right a few wrongs.’
      • ‘But on top of that, you have to put the chronology in order here.’
      • ‘It's all in place, and it's simply a matter of doing things in order.’
      • ‘The history portion isn't always in order, which can be a bit confusing.’
      • ‘Each involves a series of specific steps, which must be done correctly and in order.’
      • ‘Keep the cheques in order, and cash them in order, and don't forget to tick each one off your list each night you get back to the hotel.’
      • ‘Aaron scrambled to pick up the papers and put them in order.’
      • ‘He bet £1 and as the game progressed was dealt - in order - two red aces, a five and two more red aces.’
      • ‘Every item needed to be kept, in order, between the correct allocated colour coded dividers.’
      in sequence, in alphabetical order, in numerical order, in order of priority, in order of merit, in order of seniority
      View synonyms
    • 2In the correct condition for operation or use.

      • ‘Jon liked everything tidy and in order where he could find it, but James Hyde was a messy man.’
      • ‘Once that decision is made, airlines will then have a year to put their houses in order, before the new legal requirements come into force.’
      • ‘We reviewed the data management procedures and found them to be in order.’
      • ‘Sit down this weekend, get your affairs in order, and I promise you can trim hundreds of pounds, in some cases thousands, off your annual costs.’
      • ‘Employers are only required to ask if workers' papers are in order.’
      • ‘And it's just very hard if you don't have your legal affairs in order.’
      • ‘The committee are sparing no effort in ensuring that everything is in order for the big day.’
      • ‘He noted with approval that the room was spotless, and everything was in order.’
      • ‘Normally, as long as all the documentation is in order you will eventually be approved.’
      • ‘A two or five-year plan is better than no plan at all and you need to make sure your finances are properly in order before making a move.’
      • ‘When purchasing land, one must be careful to ensure that the title deeds are in order and that the land has been correctly classified.’
      tidy, neat, neat and tidy, orderly, straight, trim, in apple-pie order, spick and span
      View synonyms
    • 3In accordance with the rules of procedure at a meeting, legislative assembly, etc.

      • ‘I listened to Mr Mallard's question, which was not in order, and I did not allow it.’
      • ‘Just yesterday that word was ruled in order when it was used by a Minister in answering a question in this House.’
      • ‘But ultimately it is the Speaker who must rule upon whether a question is in order.’
      • ‘The Speaker ruled at the time that my comments were in order and that the member should withdraw.’
      • ‘Last week it was not in order for the Minister even to find out that simple detail.’
      • ‘But the Assembly has now determined that the Bluestone decision is quite in order and will not need further examination.’
      • ‘My recollection is that one supplementary question was ruled as being in order on that particular day.’
      • ‘There were comments made in that point of order that were not in order.’
      • ‘The Minister is responsible for his legislation, and therefore the question was in order.’
      • ‘Did that mean that he had authority to cast it, and that the vote was in order?’
      permissible, permitted, allowed, allowable, admissible, acceptable
      View synonyms
      1. 3.1Appropriate in the circumstances.
        ‘a little bit of flattery was now in order’
        • ‘For the reasons behind my mirth, a little history lesson is in order.’
        • ‘The errors in your article were significant enough that printing a correction, or at least this letter, is in order.’
        • ‘It occurred to me at about 3am, as I lay in bed with a raging fever and hacking cough, that perhaps a visit to a doctor was in order.’
        • ‘A call to the Advertising Standards Authority could be in order.’
        • ‘To put things in perspective a quick historical comparison is in order.’
        • ‘Perhaps a quick, yet enlightening, history lesson is in order.’
        • ‘Maybe some professional expert opinions are in order here.’
        • ‘After six years of a strong dollar, a correction might be in order.’
        • ‘A little modesty or circumspection would be in order here.’
        • ‘To understand the goals and significance of Gravity Probe B, a brief dip into the history of physics is in order.’
        appropriate, fitting, suitable, right, correct, proper
        View synonyms
  • in order for

    • So that.

      ‘employees must be committed to the change in order for it to succeed’
      • ‘She added the council was pursuing the acquisition of land and property along the route in order for the scheme to go ahead.’
      • ‘Alexander feels that, in order for the legal system to work, people must have free access to it.’
      • ‘Her arm will remain in a cast for a few weeks in order for her injuries to heal correctly.’
      • ‘I think in order for a record to be commercially successful it has to get exposure from press, radio and tv as well.’
      • ‘Councillors told us that in order for wild flowers to flourish the rich alluvial silt must be removed.’
      • ‘All of these are valid questions, because in order for a bully to succeed he or she must have victims.’
      • ‘The police had to close two lanes of the carriageway in order for the wreckage to be cleared.’
      • ‘This voucher should be given to the cashier at the Royal Pavilion in order for you to receive your tickets.’
      • ‘Classes were cancelled after the school shut for a day and a half at the height of the crisis in order for security to be increased.’
      • ‘However, unless your tenancy has run out you cannot be evicted in order for the house to be sold.’
  • in order that

    • With the intention; so that.

      ‘she used her mother's kitchen in order that the turkey might be properly cooked’
      • ‘The match was brought forward from a 3.30 pm kick-off to 3pm in order that they could catch their flight back to East London last night.’
      • ‘Substantial increased funding will have to be provided in order that farmers receive fair and reasonable compensation.’
      • ‘I also recommended that she get a home WiFi network in order that she could use the laptop anywhere in the house.’
      • ‘The bill aims to catch those who intentionally train people to be mercenaries in order that they can sell their fighting skills to other countries for profit.’
      • ‘We have requested additional information in order that an informed decision can be made.’
  • in order to

    • As a means to.

      ‘he slouched into his seat in order to avoid drawing attention to himself’
      • ‘This creates a problem for a company that needs to maximise its profits in order to grow.’
      • ‘I pay road tax and other taxes in order to use the highway and this is now being denied.’
      • ‘It is also expected to shed jobs through natural wastage in order to keep costs down.’
      • ‘Previously they had to find a job and apply for a work permit in order to stay in this country.’
      • ‘Also, do you need to have a credit history with a bank in order to take out a loan?’
      • ‘Then there is the huge number of people who have borrowed to the hilt in order to secure a home.’
      • ‘We have velux windows in the office and in order to see out we have to scrape the snow off them.’
      • ‘Users must set up an online account in order to view, save and print documents.’
      • ‘I set up this blog in order to keep my friends and family informed of my time in Hanoi.’
      • ‘It is an individual sport where you have to handle the pressure in order to succeed.’
  • of the order of

    • 1Approximately.

      ‘sales increases are of the order of 20%’
      • ‘We're looking at the risk of destabilisation of the West Antarctic ice sheet, or a very rapid decay of the ice sheet, leading to sea rise over centuries of the order of 6 or 7 metres or so.’
      • ‘At this rate, inflation of the order of 10 percent is pretty much inevitable.’
      • ‘The number of days taken as sick, and the cost, is of the order of 70 percent up on what it was for the same period of time last year.’
      • ‘The amount directly at stake is not especially large, the principal sum being of the order of $114,000.’
      • ‘The disease is prevalent worldwide and in 1993, the cost of health care for COPD was estimated to be of the order of $15 billion.’
      • ‘It is reasonable to assume that in due course he will have an earning capacity of the order of £10,000 per annum, but that it will take three years before he is likely to achieve that level of earnings.’
      • ‘For any real impact to be made, reductions in emissions of the order of 60 per cent are needed now.’
      • ‘In the late seventeenth century, the average number of copper coins minted annually was of the order of two to three hundred million; by the early nineteenth century this had increased eightfold.’
      • ‘Since his return to work his income had substantially increased year by year such that by 1999 it was of the order of £425, 250 p.a. gross.’
      • ‘We estimate that total area of infestation is only of the order of about 350 hectares and that's spread along about 60, 70 or so isolated populations.’
      roughly, approximately, about, around, just about, round about, or so, or thereabouts, more or less, in the neighbourhood of, in the region of, in the area of, in the vicinity of, something like, in round numbers, rounded down, rounded up
      near to, close to, nearly, not far off, almost, approaching
      getting on for
      circa
      pushing, as near as dammit
      in the ballpark of
      nigh
      View synonyms
    • 2Mathematics
      Having the order of magnitude specified by.

      • ‘Integral-expressing K562 cells were pushed by a force of the order of 100 pN against surfaces coated with iibronectin fragments.’
      • ‘With N of the order of 100 for 20dB sensitivity improvement, the total work of acquisition rises to some five orders of magnitude greater.’
      • ‘A spectrograph/diode array system accomplishes the detection with a signal-to-noise ratio of the order of 105.’
  • on order

    • (of goods) requested but not yet received from the supplier or manufacturer.

      • ‘They'd sold the last one that morning, but they put one on order for me, so I should be able to get it sometime next week.’
      • ‘We've a new metal shed on order too, so hopefully that will arrive soon.’
      • ‘And congratulations on the book: I've got a copy on order today.’
      • ‘Paul Cheevers, District Manager for Iarnrod Eireann in Waterford said that the steel girders were on order and were due to be put in place over the weekend.’
      • ‘Service is scheduled to begin in October 2005 and 29 more trains are on order.’
      • ‘He was not aware of how many buses the factory had on order.’
      • ‘Further investment was planned with an extra 10 rapid-response vehicles on order on top of 18 already sent out on the roads in the last year.’
      • ‘A county council spokesperson confirmed that new signs were on order and would be installed as soon as they arrived.’
      • ‘The firm currently operates four vessels - three bulk carriers and an oil tanker - and has a fifth on order at Guangzhou Shipyard International.’
      • ‘The new Learning Zone has 15 new computers and four more are on order which are adapted for people with disabilities.’
  • on the order of

    • another term for of the order of
      • ‘The pack's annual operating budget is on the order of $2000.’
      • ‘Fahrenheit 9/11 has sold something on the order of 13 million tickets.’
      • ‘The whole operation appears to have cost on the order of $500,000.’
      • ‘Even if economic output shrinks by 2 % this quarter, productivity would still grow on the order of 2 %.’
      • ‘The percentage of people who are university graduates in this country is still on the order of perhaps 25 percent of the adult population.’
      • ‘Agricultural subsidies cost something on the order of $1 billion a day in Western countries.’
      • ‘Private economists at Goldman Sachs expect the deficits will be on the order of $300 to $375 billion.’
      • ‘If drugs were sold in a competitive market, and the government funded research, the savings would be on the order of $120 billion a year.’
      • ‘Some estimates put the total cost of the storm, including both property damage and economic losses, on the order of $100 billion.’
      • ‘Her appearance fee was on the order of 10,000 yuan or more.’
    • 2Along the lines of; similar to.

      ‘singers on the order of Janis Joplin’
      • ‘I don't think the current malaise is a catastrophe on the order of Black Monday.’
      • ‘While not a classic on the order of 1991, this was a memorable World Series, filled with some strange and often surreal moments.’
      • ‘Mitchell grew up in a home where people on the order of Thornton Wilder, Dylan Thomas and T.S. Eliot came to visit.’
      • ‘Winkler's film seems to aspire to a quirky social commentary on the order of American Beauty.’
  • order arms

    • Hold a rifle with its butt on the ground close to one's right side.

      • ‘On the command ‘Sentries Pass,’ I saluted, ordered arms and stood at ease.’
      • ‘The three soldiers ordered arms and went on about their duties and the gates began to close.’
  • order of battle

    • The units, formations, and equipment of a military force.

      • ‘American historians were disputing basic issues, such as the enemy order of battle, decades after the conflict came to an end.’
      • ‘Scobell is credited with providing valuable intelligence on Confederate order of battle, status of supplies, and troop morale and movements.’
      • ‘They knew when it would occur and what the German order of battle would be.’
      • ‘Few old county infantry regiments remain in the British Army order of battle, but the Duke of Wellington's Regiment is proudly celebrating that very status after 300 years.’
      • ‘In September 1943 she filed a stunningly accurate report on the German missile order of battle.’
      • ‘This is the Navy's premier means of maintaining their electronic order of battle.’
      • ‘Intelligence on both the Turkish order of battle and on the topography of Gallipoli was all but non-existent.’
      • ‘Although originally set up to resolve problems arising from the interaction of the forces involved, the missions quickly adopted an intelligence collection objective - mainly to report on order of battle.’
      • ‘Perhaps ULTRA's greatest contribution to victory in the west was its cumulative accretion of details about the German order of battle.’
      • ‘The purpose is to obtain information regarding an adversary's order of battle, capabilities, plans, attitudes, and intentions.’
  • orders are orders

    • Commands must be obeyed, however much one may disagree with them.

      • ‘I don't see the point, it's not like the grass is gonna grow much in this weather, but orders are orders.’
      • ‘But orders are orders, I'm sure after so many years, you understand.’
      • ‘But orders are orders, and it was a matter of honor.’
      • ‘It's a shame that such beauty has to be wasted, but orders are orders.’
      • ‘I'm really sorry about this but orders are orders,’ Tommy said with a slight smile.’
  • out of order

    • 1(of an electrical or mechanical device) not working properly or at all.

      • ‘BT engineers are working round the clock to restore services, but about 2,400 lines are still out of order.’
      • ‘The elevator is constantly out of order; nobody has ever tried to fix it.’
      • ‘The idea of climbing five stories of stairs made his head spin, and the elevator was out of order.’
      • ‘BT told us our telephone would be out of order until July 8.’
      • ‘My brother-in-law had a phone installed three weeks ago and it has been out of order longer than it has been usable.’
      • ‘They also claim residents dare not use the lift because it continually breaks down, and most of the intercoms linked to the building's entry system are out of order.’
      • ‘Mind you, my nearest proper cashpoint - at the station - has been out of order for six months.’
      • ‘Then when I got to the office I found that the lift was out of order and that I'd have to climb all the way to the 4th floor using the stairs.’
      • ‘The bleedin ticket machine is out of order too.’
      • ‘Housing bosses have apologised to residents of a Bradford 14 storey tower block over a lift which has been out of order for seven months.’
      not working, not in working order, not functioning, broken, broken-down, out of service, out of commission, acting up, unserviceable, faulty, defective, non-functional, inoperative, in disrepair
      View synonyms
    • 2Not in the correct sequence.

      • ‘The only way I could be more intrigued with it would probably be if it had been released in bits and pieces, out of order, and left as clues all over the internet.’
      • ‘It is like being in an art gallery; the reader can read the pieces in order, out of order, any way that excites.’
      • ‘It feels like the sequence is out of order with the rest of the movie.’
      • ‘At first I thought it might be a problem with sequencing so I tried playing the record out of order.’
      • ‘It was Fiona's first day at Nursery, so his weekday morning routine was out of order already, and I put much of his bad humour down to that fact.’
      • ‘His books do read best chronologically as he always has running storylines, but I've read them out of order and it's no great problem.’
      • ‘This is an old man remembering his life: scenes appear out of order.’
      • ‘At Midway in 1942, Navy pilots trained to attack in a precisely choreographed sequence ignored their instructions and attacked out of order.’
    • 3Not according to the rules of a meeting, legislative assembly, etc.

      • ‘In the past, moves to protect the environment have been ruled out of order because of trade legislation.’
      • ‘The Republicans, ruling the amendment out of order, defeated it in a party-line vote of 222-200.’
      • ‘The word ‘duplicitous’ has been ruled out of order on a number of occasions in this House, and my view is that the expression the member used is so close to that as to be the same.’
      • ‘The amendments in the name of Dr Nick Smith have been ruled out of order as they are inconsistent with the previous decision of the Committee.’
      • ‘Someone attempted to ask a question and initially the Speaker in his wisdom ruled it out of order, but upon reflection he allowed it.’
      • ‘I ruled subsequent interjections out of order.’
      • ‘Despite being ruled out of order on several occasions Dr Cowley continued to address the point and was eventually dismissed amid uproar.’
      • ‘I think that remark should be ruled out of order.’
      • ‘Even if that point were correct, I suggest that the question is out of order on another ground.’
      • ‘An earlier request by his supporters for an extraordinary general meeting was ruled out of order because it had not been submitted in accordance with party rules.’
      1. 3.1informal (of a person or their behavior) unacceptable or wrong.
        ‘he's getting away with things that are out of order’
        • ‘Some of the things he was saying concerning the Make Poverty History Campaign were completely out of order.’
        • ‘A 15 per cent council tax rise is well out of order, especially if it includes spending £2.7 million on an art museum.’
        • ‘He walked close up to the manager and said: ‘You're out of order.’’
        • ‘Mind you, as an old man I'd say this was well out of order.’
        • ‘A Warminster man admitted his drunken behaviour had been out of order when he appeared before magistrates.’
        • ‘His behaviour in front of the children was out of order.’
        • ‘The referee stopped the fight early and he was out of order because I could have carried on.’
        • ‘‘They were totally out of order in the way they spoke to everybody,’ he said.’
        • ‘O'Connell was out of order and deserved the red card.’
        • ‘There's going to be a little comeback this time, because enough of us feel that Senior Manager is bang out of order on several counts.’
        unacceptable, unfair, unjust, unjustified, uncalled for, below the belt, out of turn, not done, unreasonable, unwarranted, unnecessary, wrong, beyond the pale, Improper, irregular
        View synonyms
  • to order

    • According to a customer's specific request or requirements.

      ‘the sweaters are knitted to order’
      • ‘Rare pieces are stolen to order by gangs who use the works to launder money.’
      • ‘Experts believe some of the football memorabilia could have been stolen to order.’
      • ‘Clearly our choices were being cooked to order so there was a delay before the food arrived.’
      • ‘A gang of thieves who steal items to order have struck at a pine furniture shop for the second time.’
      • ‘Service is meticulous and as far as we could tell the food was prepared to order.’
      • ‘It is likely the jewels were stolen to order, and they could well have been offloaded by now.’
      • ‘The gang cruised the streets to find high performance luxury cars stolen to order for the job.’
      • ‘He thinks the animals were stolen to order - but the rustlers bungled the job in the dark.’
      • ‘More memorable, however, is the gutsy food, cooked to order and served at a relaxed pace.’
      • ‘Thieves have been snatching luxury cars in Bedford to order, police are warning.’

Origin

Middle English: from Old French ordre, from Latin ordo, ordin- row, series, rank.

Pronunciation:

order

/ˈôrdər/