Definition of orchestral in English:

orchestral

adjective

  • 1Written for an orchestra to play.

    ‘orchestral music’
    • ‘This week sees him hook up with the London Symphony Orchestra for four nights of 20th Century orchestral music.’
    • ‘No waves of orchestral music or familiar songs manipulate the audience's emotional responses.’
    • ‘Of course he played tricks in his songs, as in his orchestral music and operas.’
    • ‘His choral and vocal music is well known too, but his orchestral music much less so.’
    • ‘I am madly in love with composing for orchestra and hope to die writing an orchestral piece!’
    • ‘Recently it has been soundtrack music and orchestral music.’
    • ‘In the week that the Scottish orchestras open their winter seasons, the future of orchestral music has never been under such scrutiny.’
    • ‘That means there is an imposing solemnity to everything that happens and a lush sweep of orchestral music to accompany every moment.’
    • ‘The music consists of lively orchestral music but only during battles.’
    • ‘By 1800 Beethoven was writing more orchestral music, and the sonatas began to break away from the symphonic mould.’
    • ‘Just then, the movie began, with all its bright colors and orchestral music.’
    • ‘In those early years he would frequently transcribe orchestral music for the organ.’
    • ‘In the old version of the film this is scored with orchestral music, which the restoration has wisely removed.’
    • ‘It's a stone cold fact that orchestral music either makes you fidget in your seat or it sweeps you away to another place.’
    • ‘You would believe that Debussy himself wrote the orchestral version of Claire de lune.’
    • ‘Mostly chamber music gets recorded, because orchestral music costs more to record.’
    • ‘Like its predecessors, the third volume of Richard Hickox's survey of Bridge's orchestral music mixes early and late works.’
    • ‘More than a decade ago, Torke wrote a series of orchestral works inspired by colors.’
    • ‘Come Alive is a lush collection of orchestral pop tunes written and sung by Fox and backed by the cream of the crop of local players.’
    • ‘The beautiful sense of orchestral chamber music the trio brought to the Largo was memorable.’
    1. 1.1 Relating to an orchestra.
      ‘an orchestral conductor’
      • ‘She conducts with gusto and vivacity, and her orchestral forces are unusually strong.’
      • ‘No conductor presently active commands more respect from orchestral players than Lorin Maazel.’
      • ‘The sensitiveness of the suggestive language could be carried into the music and orchestral setting.’
      • ‘The world's top maestros regularly earn more in a night than the orchestral musicians they are conducting earn in a year.’
      • ‘He then moved into percussion and orchestral instruments before gravitating to singing and conducting.’
      • ‘So after four years I moved to London to study orchestral conducting at the Royal College of Music.’
      • ‘From Auckland, Vivian had been an orchestral conductor while Harold played clarinet.’
      • ‘With the exception of contemporary music, orchestral concerts tend to be a safer bet to sell than theatre or opera.’
      • ‘Reger, thanks to his experience as a conductor, was a master of orchestral sound.’
      • ‘She has a BA in orchestral conducting and a diploma in advanced performance from the Royal College of Music.’
      • ‘I enjoyed listening to this music and the orchestral collaboration is excellent.’
      • ‘In the pit, Bruno Campanella conducts a purposeful yet expressive orchestral performance.’

Pronunciation

orchestral

/ɔrˈkɛstrəl//ôrˈkestrəl/