Main definitions of opera in English

: opera1opera2

opera1

noun

  • 1A dramatic work in one or more acts, set to music for singers and instrumentalists.

    • ‘Yet it is hard to avoid some sense, in many of his operas, that the music is at times cerebral in its conception.’
    • ‘Of course he played tricks in his songs, as in his orchestral music and operas.’
    • ‘Realism seems to be in at the moment, so operas are dramatic stories set to music.’
    • ‘The same could be said of musicals, operas, ballets, songs, and other narrative forms.’
    • ‘Her next step into the world of acting was performing in television dramas in Delhi, with occasional roles in stage plays and operas.’
    • ‘But then, I seldom have the sense that Miller ever listens to the music of the operas he directs.’
    • ‘For someone reason, I got it into my head the other day that he only wrote a few symphonies and operas, the odd piano concerto, and the Requiem.’
    • ‘The festival has been going since then, and every summer it presents operas, plays and concerts of the finest.’
    • ‘Yet Strauss manages to create an opera which wrings every dramatic drop from the text.’
    • ‘They are even hungry for classical music - operas, symphonies and solo concerts.’
    • ‘The portrayal of the situations is assisted by cantatas, arias, duets, operas and music.’
    • ‘In the 1770s he began composing symphonies, concertos, operas and theater music.’
    • ‘He declared that some of his best ideas came to him while listening to chamber music and Mozart operas.’
    • ‘We tend to associate Handel operas with high voiced prima donnas, the castrati and the sopranos.’
    • ‘They attended the opera, concerts, and took part in a chamber music competition.’
    • ‘The discretionary fund is used to pay musicians, broadcast live classical music concerts and operas.’
    • ‘I was busy experimenting with folk music and composing operas.’
    • ‘These include seven symphonies, nine operas, and chamber, organ and piano works.’
    • ‘Radamisto was the first opera that Handel wrote for the fledgling Royal Academy of Music.’
    • ‘It's a liturgical work incorporating all the drama of the composer's operas.’
    work of art, work, creation, artistic work, literary work, musical work, opus, oeuvre, piece, arrangement
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1 Opera as a genre of classical music.
      • ‘This work has all the lyrical beauty we associate with the more traditional type of opera.’
      • ‘In the last few years London has seen a variety of operatic styles in contemporary opera.’
      • ‘Are we going to take the narrow view which sees Scottish Opera as an oxymoron, and opera and classical music as not really Scottish?’
      • ‘It helps explain why opera and musical theatre are the two largest growing public art forms.’
      • ‘Theatre and opera were bounded by the physical limitations of scenery and props.’
      • ‘It's a mystery, and it seems to happen every time Boulez gets involved with opera.’
      • ‘There are many people who are very used to listening to opera, classical music, world music, and pop in languages other than their own.’
      • ‘The opera has been around China for more than 400 years, impacting many other genres of folk opera.’
      • ‘Outside medicine she loved the arts and literature and particularly classical music and opera.’
      • ‘Suddenly, he found out that singing opera was a lot more fun than singing pop.’
      • ‘Here, he takes a surrealist text and puts it in the dramatic context of early Baroque opera.’
      • ‘Verdi mavens and lovers of opera in general will surely want this fine recording.’
      • ‘You might not think of St. Louis, Missouri, as a place to go to see opera in the summer.’
      • ‘It was a fitting tribute to a man whose love of the arts, especially fine art, classical music and opera, is one of his great passions.’
      • ‘She is familiar with all styles of singing, from opera, to musical theatre oration and cabaret.’
      • ‘Long, long ago, in a galaxy far, far away, musical theatre and opera were bitter, resentful enemies.’
      • ‘By contrast, the outer panels of the triptych are closer to the world of opera than that of oratorio.’
      • ‘He has also designed extensively for theatre, opera, Broadway musicals, and film.’
      • ‘In this respect, the piece is operatic and, like opera, is sometimes exaggerated and campy.’
      • ‘This allowed him to listen to opera and classical music as he read books about nature.’
    2. 1.2 A building for the performance of opera.
      • ‘When your day's work is done, I can bring the theatre or the opera to your home’
      • ‘She was back in London by 1737, when the Opera of the Nobility collapsed.’
      • ‘The way that we go to the opera, the theatre and the concert has hardly changed for centuries.’
      • ‘You decide to splash out on a night at the opera, but the theatre is full.’
      • ‘On the other hand, there's nothing like going to the opera or Shakespearean theatre on a mild dose of magic mushrooms.’

Origin

Mid 17th century: from Italian, from Latin, literally ‘labor, work’.

Pronunciation

opera

/ˈäp(ə)rə//ˈɑp(ə)rə/

Main definitions of opera in English

: opera1opera2

opera2

Pronunciation

opera

/ˈɑp(ə)rə//ˈäp(ə)rə/