Definition of open shop in English:

open shop


  • 1A system whereby employees in a place of work are not required to join a labor union.

    Compare with closed shop, union shop
    • ‘This feat is performed almost effortlessly in the context of a well-structured chronological saga that is climaxed by three ‘bloodless’ battles waged over the open shop.’
    • ‘About 270 workers struck Johnson Truck on April 7 after the company, owned by Carlisle Companies, demanded, in addition to economic concessions, an open shop and the dropping of the automatic dues check-off.’
    • ‘But the Teamsters bureaucracy broke off negotiations only when the company insisted on instituting an open shop and dropping the dues checkoff, whereby the company deducts union dues from workers' paychecks.’
    • ‘The Song of the South generally sounds the same from upper management to crafts, especially when it comes to a preference for open shop and to opinions on the economy.’
    • ‘The Teamsters struck Johnson Truck after the company insisted on an open shop and an end to deducting union dues from workers' paychecks.’
    • ‘St. John's also wants an open shop that allows nonunion nurses to opt out of the fee.’
    • ‘He asserted that the open shop - that is, the right of employers to hire non-union workers - was ‘vital to the greatest industrial progress or prosperity.’’
    • ‘He gave more power to principals who now sign two-year, at-will contracts under Texas' open shop.’
    • ‘The sagging economy, competition from the open shop and a new, younger breed of workers and employers have changed the face of construction.’
    • ‘Harrison Gray Otis and his son-in-law Harry Chandler used the Los Angeles Times as the spearhead of the decades-long campaign by business interests to maintain southern California as a bastion of the open shop.’
    1. 1.1A place of work where employees are not required to join a labor union.
      • ‘The ‘second almost bloodless victory’ belonged to labor when it closed those open shops over the course of the 1930s.’