Definition of open secret in English:

open secret

noun

  • A supposed secret that is in fact known to many people.

    • ‘It signals the inevitability of secrets being opened in small communities, and the fact that open secrets necessitate the importance of self and social presentation.’
    • ‘You're saying this was an open secret for three months.’
    • ‘But it is also an example of the common pattern by which open secrets only get discussed by the press once a prominent person states them publicly.’
    • ‘The move lifts the lid on one of the biggest open secrets in the medical profession that often sees drinking problems among doctors being swept under the carpet.’
    • ‘It is now an open secret that a senior police official in this region and the administrative head of the district are not on the same wavelength.’
    • ‘But there is an open secret within the media community.’
    • ‘Yet our secret government is an open secret: a condition that cannot last.’
    • ‘‘It had been an open secret in Boston political circles for years,’ reveals Bannon.’
    • ‘This state of affairs has been an open secret for some time in Turkey and is now being more or less openly admitted by the media and many well-known politicians.’
    • ‘The girl is still at school so it's one of those open secrets.’
    • ‘But the open secret in politics is that attacks can work, and that no serious campaign leaves any openings unexploited.’
    • ‘Their presence, however, is an open secret in the town.’
    • ‘Neither party has confirmed that talks have begun on a possible offer, despite the fact that the discussions are now an open secret.’
    • ‘It is an open secret that Gardai ‘on the beat’ encounter all kinds of difficulties emanating in the main from an over indulgence in alcohol.’
    • ‘I suppose it was an open secret that Fortune Mike had a kidney problem and that it never really cleared up.’
    • ‘Sexual abuse of children certainly was quite an open secret there.’
    • ‘In fact, it is an open secret that many African governments are dominated by small elite groups that run their countries in a secretive and authoritarian manner.’
    • ‘This is, in fact, another of those open secrets of academic publishing: a book doesn't actually need an original theory.’
    • ‘Royal Bank of Scotland has been touted as a potential occupier and, until recently, this was an open secret in Glasgow's property circles.’
    • ‘It is an open secret in study abroad that many Americans work there ‘under-the-table’ without a visa.’

Pronunciation:

open secret

/ˈōpən ˈsēkrit/