Definition of open book in English:

open book

noun

  • A person or thing that is easily understood or interpreted.

    ‘my life's an open book’
    • ‘He could read Mel like an open book, he always had been able too.’
    • ‘And best friends read each other like open books.’
    • ‘Tonight, her life has been an open book and a tabloid target, a rare interview with Melanie Griffith.’
    • ‘Until recently, few of us had realistic fears that our lives would become an open book to the world at large.’
    • ‘From your social causes to cute pet photos, your life is a open book.’
    • ‘People might accuse you of being an open book because you have nothing to hide.’
    • ‘Harvey Pekar's life is an open book, and an illustrated one at that.’
    • ‘Elvis, on the other hand, was missing his Mama, and his soul at that moment was an open book.’
    • ‘She was so easy to read, if not like an open book, then at least like a book that gave everything away in the blurb.’
    • ‘Brasen just stayed silent trying his hardest to avoid any eye contact with her, he knew more than anyone that she could read people like open books and right now she was flipping through his pages.’
    • ‘From video cameras to ID cards to background checks, employees' lives are basically open books to whomever is paying their salary.’
    • ‘And there is much else that is mysterious about Susan's life, especially for someone whose life is such an open book.’
    • ‘I dreaded going home, knowing that, to my mom, my face was an open book.’
    • ‘In the beginning at least, Finney claimed he had been an open book.’
    • ‘But the facility standards are an open book to anyone who is interested.’
    • ‘Senator Ted Stevens wanted to know just how much the Internet had turned private lives into open books.’
    • ‘Unfortunately for her, she's always been as readable as an open book.’
    • ‘Her face was an open book to anyone who knew how to read her.’
    • ‘He had been an open book that Mr. Russo had never tired of reading.’
    • ‘John was an open book but Andrea, Ally knew, would be harder to decode.’