Main definitions of oof in US English:

: oof1oof2

oof1

exclamation

  • Expressing discomfort, as from sudden exertion or a blow to one's body.

    • ‘She closed her eyes, trying to make it all go away and force herself awake, when she ran straight into a soft something that went oof!’
    • ‘My name's Gilgamesh, and I'm new in these parts - oof, hey, don't squeeze me so hard, Lacy!’
    • ‘Radley gave a small oof as they managed to get him against the stale hay mattress.’
    • ‘I had to use one, but when I opened the door - oof, the stench was terrible!’
    • ‘‘I think you could have thought of some other way to check other than punching me,’ he said with an oof.’
    • ‘I'll call you every other day and email you all the time and - oof, sorry.’
    • ‘Now, listen, boys, if this is about that time on Kumar, I've already said that I had no idea those fruit would be toxic, and even less idea that you'd be quarantined for so long while they cleaned you up, and - oof!’
    • ‘Wendy lost her train of thought as the cab curbed sharply, making her stomach wince - oof.’
    • ‘Well you see he has some issues with some guy and we have some and - oof!’
    • ‘With a loud thump and the inevitable oof, the tourist was free.’
    • ‘She rebounded off the surprisingly hard girl and landed on the floor with a muted oof.’
    • ‘I know a place on earth we can go, if you guys can - oof!’

Origin

Natural exclamation: first recorded in English in the mid 19th century.

Pronunciation

oof

/o͞of/

Main definitions of oof in US English:

: oof1oof2

oof2

noun

dated, informal
  • Money; cash.

    • ‘Strike while the iron's hot and save yourself some oof.’
    • ‘When you've got that much oof, he said, it's hard to spend it, and he and his other senior execs spend an incredible number of hours in the day working for the firm.’
    cash, hard cash, ready money
    View synonyms

Origin

Late 19th century: from Yiddish oyf ‘on’, tish ‘table’, i.e. ‘on the table’ (referring to money in gambling).

Pronunciation

oof

/o͞of/