Definition of one-woman in English:

one-woman

adjective

  • Involving, done, or operated by only one woman.

    • ‘I've since replaced my one-woman show with an ensemble piece.’
    • ‘Consequently sales for these oftentimes one-woman operations far exceed those at most other conventions.’
    • ‘For now, the one-woman show has been enough, but someday Devangelis hopes to take on seamstresses to help relieve her aching fingers.’
    • ‘I reach her in L.A. where she is performing Jimmy, the one-woman show she presents at Kaboom3 this week.’
    • ‘This is her second one-woman show at the Dunamaise Arts Centre.’
    • ‘As he watched her perform her one-woman show, The Speed of Darkness, in the 1990s, he found himself completely absorbed.’
    • ‘This one-woman show is a memoir of that time, with Arslanian coming to terms with both her ill health and her ill treatment by friends and family.’
    • ‘The two-minute Fringe-for-all promo for this show had three belly dancers, but in reality this seems to be a one-woman show.’
    • ‘Cheryl in particular is a one-woman headline machine.’
    • ‘Biokhraphia, a one-woman Lebanese theatre piece, and one of the Royal Bank Lates aimed at new audiences.’
    • ‘She also has a gift for physically interpreting the words she speaks, which adds to the delightful humour of this one-woman show.’
    • ‘Her life offers an embarrassment of material for an entertaining one-woman show, but See How Beautiful I Am has all the character of a slug.’
    • ‘She did a one-woman show of Joyce Grenfell monologues.’
    • ‘The second set became a one-woman show as the 22-year-old Wukir outplayed her senior throughout.’
    • ‘Just concluded an enormously successful engagement, a one-woman show in New York's theater.’
    • ‘It's a one-woman operation - the charming Singh bakes it all and sells it all herself.’
    • ‘Although famous and infamous before her Nobel, this one-woman cudgel has been embraced rather gingerly.’
    • ‘However, Smith's one-woman Sound of Music medley was a showstopper, inspiring even my cynical self to join in lustily!’
    • ‘This one-woman band fiddled and jigged from Dent to Barrow to Bradford during her recent winter tour, bringing a smile to the faces of shoppers across the North.’
    • ‘She was used to being a one-woman show from her earliest days, and for years efforts at carrying this through to adulthood were nurtured.’

Pronunciation:

one-woman

/wən ˈwo͝omən/