Definition of on the right side of in US English:

on the right side of

phrase

  • 1On the safe, appropriate, or desirable side of.

    ‘a record that fully embraces the theatricality of its genre but falls just on the right side of ridiculous’
    • ‘Fuel consumption is a good point and most owners should get well on the right side of 30 mpg, even when city driving predominates.’
    • ‘Jamie Bell, of Billy Elliot fame, in particular gives a very mature performance that rests just on the right side of quirky.’
    • ‘But it stays on the right side of the dividing line between decent value and overpriced, with a three-course meal coming in at around £25, plus wine and service.’
    • ‘But anyone who's reached adulthood and remained on the right side of a pass mark is a pleasure to behold: the bright eyes, the confidence, the goodwill and good-heartedness.’
    • ‘On occasion this works fine: on Callier's Miles Davis tribute, 4 Miles, his backing band keep their solos just on the right side of overlong.’
    • ‘The motorway figure of 47 mpg shows the potential on long runs, so most owners should end up on the right side of 40 mpg.’
    • ‘A curious combination of the sweepingly monumental and the irascibly quirky - just on the right side of pretentious, some might say - awaits those prepared to give them a go.’
    • ‘Frears always keeps his drama on the right side of plausibility, if only by a whisker.’
    • ‘Sounds to me like Krikorian has fully hedged his position so that he can be on the right side of this move either way.’
    • ‘It's useful and desirable, while staying on the right side of fetishistic.’
    • ‘There's a distinction between rehash and revision, though, and the Black Angels fall on the right side of that fence.’
    1. 1.1 In a position to be viewed with favor by.
      ‘he hasn't always remained on the right side of the law’
      • ‘It is difficult to see what an advertiser hoping to stay on the right side of Ofcom can usefully learn from these rulings, other than that you now need a PhD in gender studies before you can make an acceptable ad.’
      • ‘Although hands-free equipment can keep drivers on the right side of the law, some experts have warned such kits ignore the spirit of the new legislation and still provide a distraction from the road.’
      • ‘I was on the winning side which just proves that it's best to be on the right side of the law!’
      • ‘‘The first rule of a parliamentary candidate is ‘Get on the right side of the women’!’’
      • ‘Being in the commodities business, often combined with being on the right side of the political power structure, was the main factor deciding which Russians made the list - and who dropped down or off it.’
      • ‘National park rangers have been demonstrating their latest piece of high-tech kit, which should help boat owners on Windermere stay on the right side of the law.’
      • ‘Consequently, companies took contribution holidays and/or took back some of the surpluses to keep on the right side of the Inland Revenue.’
      • ‘These are the kinds of things that criminals do, yet these people are said to be on the right side of the law.’
      • ‘He said: ‘He wants to stay on the right side of the law.’’
      • ‘They took good care throughout their reign to keep on the right side of the British for reasons of self-preservation, as much as loyalty to the principle of perpetual friendship prescribed in the peace treaty.’
      • ‘Smaller companies confused by ever-changing employment laws can learn how to stay on the right side of new regulations at Business First 2004.’
    2. 1.2 Somewhat less than (a specified age)
      ‘she's on the right side of forty’
      • ‘Will it be lineage, caste and community politics or being on the right side of thirty?’
      • ‘He is just about on the right side of 30 but he looks like he could go on for years yet.’