Definition of omission in English:

omission

noun

  • 1Someone or something that has been left out or excluded.

    ‘there are glaring omissions in the report’
    • ‘Boston College was the glaring omission from this year's tourney.’
    • ‘Yet such analysis has not so far been undertaken and is a notable omission from the Intergovernmental Report on Climate Change.’
    • ‘This was the glaring omission from not one but two local government bills announced on Wednesday.’
    • ‘His disillusionment began when he was a surprise omission from the Brisbane test against Australia in November despite some sharp leadup spells.’
    • ‘A notable omission from this miscellany of singers is of course, the castrato.’
    • ‘It always appeared to me to be a glaring omission from the very first legislation put before the House.’
    • ‘This has been a glaring omission from other farm management texts, but one that has become more important with growth in the global economy.’
    • ‘Its omission from my column last week changed the meaning of that column entirely.’
    • ‘The puzzling omission from Hamowy's account is any discussion of circumcision.’
    • ‘He was a surprise omission from India's tour party after he troubled the Australian batsmen during the recent one-day series in India.’
    • ‘An omission from a police report is not a false police report under California law.’
    • ‘A final omission from Frank's work is a discussion of her role as an academic.’
    • ‘However, a notable omission from this book is any discussion of how and when to teach patients self-hypnosis.’
    • ‘A glaring omission from the speech was the 2003 budget, which is traditionally tabled along with the president's address.’
    • ‘That was a fundamental omission from an otherwise excellent article.’
    • ‘He was passed fit to play in the final Test, so it's a stretch to imagine his omission from the ODI squad is injury-related.’
    • ‘The projects omission from the latest announcement of Government funding for new schools has left St Patrick's Secondary School in a predicament.’
    • ‘That omission from the curriculum might have had tragic consequences.’
    • ‘It is those two civil wars, of 1641 and 1688, that stand as the largest omission from Thady's narrative.’
    • ‘I had never caught a sea trout before and it was a glaring omission from my personal best lists!’
    deletion, cut, exclusion, gap, blank, lacuna, hiatus
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    1. 1.1 The action of excluding or leaving out someone or something.
      ‘the omission of recent publications from his bibliography’
      • ‘He has lied large and small, directly and by omission.’
      • ‘It was written from kind of a superficial, Hollywood point of view, essentially filled, I think, with a lot of lies by omission.’
      • ‘Call it government by commission and omission.’
      • ‘This omission will have major repercussions for the village of Staverton.’
      • ‘It was a classic case of censorship by omission.’
      • ‘The City number one tweaked a muscle in his back in training forcing his surprise omission from last night's team.’
      • ‘The error of omission that excluded council from the lawsuit decision occurred under last year's leadership.’
      • ‘His latest omission from the national squad came in the autumn even though his form at club level was good.’
      • ‘Finally, several respondents take issue with my policy recommendations, based on alleged sins of commission or omission.’
      • ‘They were happy to subsidise Qantas by omission.’
      • ‘But it's not something I've been lying about, even in omission.’
      • ‘It's as clear an example in recent memory of committing bias by omission.’
      • ‘Yesterday's statement said his omission from the squad to play Turkey in Istanbul on Saturday was unfair to him and the squad as a whole.’
      • ‘Still except for sundry exceptions of inadequate transference and omission, he renders them competently.’
      • ‘All of which makes his omission from the BBC's hardly-blanket coverage even more inexplicable.’
      • ‘Last month, three straight starts preceded his omission from both halves of the league and cup double-header.’
      • ‘I do not, for example, unfold my handkerchief before putting it in my pocket in the mornings, and apparently by this omission I am taking quite a risk.’
      • ‘Perhaps a belief that everyone would assume this was undertaken explains its omission from the final trial report.’
      • ‘This clanging omission was at least partly behind the housing crisis of the early 1990s when 1000 families a week lost their homes because of mortgage debt.’
      • ‘His omission from the World Cup squad - even though he knew it was coming - was a heavy blow.’
      leaving out, exclusion, exception, non-inclusion, deletion, erasure, cut, excision, elimination, absence
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    2. 1.2 A failure to do something, especially something that one has a moral or legal obligation to do.
      ‘to pay compensation for a wrongful act or omission’
      • ‘As a general rule, however, there is no liability in tortious negligence for an omission, unless the defendant is under some pre-existing duty.’
      • ‘In all those cases the omission relied on is failure on the part of the defendant to exercise its statutory powers.’
      • ‘It is the Claimant's contention that this damage was avoidable and caused by a negligent omission by Mr Roberts.’
      • ‘Accordingly, THB is liable to Commonwealth for its negligent acts and/or omissions.’
      • ‘Could you give me some examples of sections which are express provisions related to negligent acts or omissions?’
      • ‘The present claims all arise from acts or omissions of the tribunal.’
      • ‘It is possible that this would be constructive manslaughter, although there is doubt as to whether an omission can constitute an unlawful and dangerous act for this purpose.’
      • ‘A broad definition would encompass all disclosures of malpractice, as well as illegal acts or omissions.’
      • ‘Another omission is the failure to afford transparency to the process of review.’
      • ‘There was no physical act on the part of D which caused the injury but rather an omission, i.e. his failure to apply the handbrake.’
      • ‘The plaintiff must suffer actual harm and prove the harm was caused by the nurse's negligent acts or omissions.’
      • ‘The first question is whether at the time of the negligent act or omission a judicial process existed.’
      • ‘So what does he have to say about the lack of accountability of the judiciary for their own negligent acts and omissions?’
      • ‘We say that the liability resulted from the acts or omissions of negligence and the act or omission in relation to the trespass.’
      • ‘It was the wrongful act or omission of the offender which rendered him or her liable, not the unhappy result.’
      • ‘This type of case is complicated by the fact that the key element in D's conduct is an omission, the failure to alert V to the fact that the normal assumptions were untrue.’
      • ‘That is what I think is the situation here, unless you can persuade me otherwise. There was a negligent omission on the part of the employer.’
      • ‘What acts or omissions can the claimant rely upon in relation to each defendant separately?’
      • ‘The first is the purely factual question: what would have happened (on a balance of probability) if the negligent omission had not occurred?’
      • ‘The words ‘any wrongful act or omission’ are in my view wide enough to encompass all wrongful acts or omissions.’
      negligence, neglect, neglectfulness, dereliction, forgetfulness, oversight, disregard, non-fulfilment, default, lapse, failure
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Origin

Late Middle English: from late Latin omissio(n-), from the verb omittere (see omit).

Pronunciation