Definition of Old Guard in English:

Old Guard

(also Old Guard)

noun

  • The original or long-standing members of a group or party, especially ones who are unwilling to accept change or new ideas.

    ‘the aging right-wing old guard’
    • ‘The passing of so many from the old guard means that in Australia, they really are getting younger.’
    • ‘There was an old guard moving out, as they gradually retired and people like myself came in.’
    • ‘But even some of the old guard are aware of the acute need for change.’
    • ‘This week, though, the old guard will aim to re-impose the established order.’
    • ‘He was too easily swayed by others and too anxious to be accepted by the old guard of the Senate.’
    • ‘In the decade since Independence, most of the old guard have by now been amply rewarded for their loyalties.’
    • ‘In my last years of teaching I was regularly informed that when the new breed of keen young teachers emerged from the colleges the old guard would be shown up.’
    • ‘He was pushing 70, and the last representative of the old guard within the Congress.’
    • ‘The other test will be how he handles renegades and copes with the vacancies caused by the departure of the old guard.’
    • ‘Many of the old guard have now moved down a level, which will hopefully help to bring on the many youngsters in the sides.’
    • ‘If that's the most the Treasury has learnt since Black Wednesday, let's hope the old guard has resigned or retired.’
    • ‘You've got a built-in bureaucracy - people will fight tooth and nail to keep their positions - and there are old guards in the ruling party.’
    • ‘The old guard, some of whom I cursed at the time, are a different breed from those who are taking their place.’
    • ‘In Holland, talented new generations emerge to nudge out the old guard.’
    • ‘The Cannes selectors put a great deal of their faith in the old guard of cinema greats this year and the decision appears to have paid off.’
    • ‘Tom was the last of the old guard who were a group of true community policemen.’
    • ‘When you were justice minister, you met resistance from the old guard.’
    • ‘Nevertheless, 1977 put anyone resembling the old guard into the firing line.’
    • ‘He does this with bags of charm and eventually we're completely on his side despite his earlier culling of the old guard.’
    • ‘We're using media in a new way that's fresh and exciting and it's making the old guard nervous.’

Pronunciation:

Old Guard

/ˌōld ˈɡärd/