Definition of occasion in English:

occasion

noun

  • 1A particular time or instance of an event.

    ‘on one occasion I stayed up until two in the morning’
    • ‘Holidays and other special occasions are marked with singing and dancing.’
    • ‘The accused testified and offered excuses in relation to her failure to comply on several other occasions during this period.’
    • ‘Holland has won the title five times while Pakistan emerged victorious on three occasions.’
    • ‘Actually, I could only remember one other occasion, months and months ago.’
    • ‘In 1979 Jimmy Carter used the occasion of the tenth anniversary of the lunar landing to push his energy program.’
    • ‘There had been only one previous occasion when I actually had to appear in court.’
    • ‘Rovers boast an excellent record in the competition having reached the final on two previous occasions in recent years.’
    • ‘His swimming marathon last summer was on the occasion of his 40th birthday.’
    • ‘We took a while to find the right direction on two or three occasions.’
    • ‘On all four occasions, patients were transferred to other hospitals in the city.’
    • ‘Already, the industry has found sales touching the expected figures on four occasions.’
    • ‘Ceremonies marking many official occasions are held in the country's churches.’
    • ‘Not everything said or written on an occasion of qualified privilege is protected.’
    • ‘On at least three difference occasions, Neil accepted the hospitality of his hosts.’
    • ‘You have been before the courts on many occasions over the years.’
    • ‘Theresa is already working on big celebrations to mark the special occasion in the history of the prominent Association.’
    • ‘The trial of Mr Daly had been adjourned on a number of occasions in the past.’
    • ‘Were the written words used by the defendant on an occasion of qualified privilege?’
    • ‘Here BBC Sport recalls the five previous occasions when the ultimate prize in European rugby has been on the line.’
    • ‘The meal followed and it proved to be a most enjoyable social occasion.’
    instance, time, moment, juncture, point
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1 A special or noteworthy event, ceremony, or celebration.
      ‘she was presented with a gold watch to mark the occasion’
      • ‘Another center of Shan life is the Buddhist monastery, where many occasions are celebrated.’
      • ‘Today, on the occasion of his 70th birthday, we wish him well.’
      • ‘In 1974 he was invited to address the US Congress on the occasion of the celebrations marking the American bicentennial.’
      • ‘The greatest occasion for celebration in a Kurd's life is marriage.’
      • ‘The recent parish outing and day trip to West Mayo proved a very enjoyable occasion.’
      • ‘Nobody is going to have that many special occasions in their life.’
      • ‘The name-giving ceremony is a formal occasion celebrated by feasting and drinking.’
      • ‘Mass will be celebrated to mark the occasion and the dinner and party will be held in the Anglers Rest Hotel in Headford.’
      • ‘The ceremony was an occasion for considerable celebration, but Margaret was never crowned queen.’
      • ‘The entire set, costumes and props will also be flown to New York for the gala occasion.’
      • ‘Some cultures decorate to celebrate a festive occasion, others to mark membership in a group or tribe.’
      • ‘They gave me a crystal wine glass to celebrate the momentous occasion.’
      • ‘He did this on several festive, campy occasions.’
      • ‘Last week there were celebrations to mark the occasion with Mass being celebrated by the new Bishop of Galway.’
      • ‘They marked the occasion with a celebration with family and neighbours.’
      • ‘Weddings are important and costly occasions for celebration in both the Portuguese and Chinese communities.’
      • ‘Patel admitted he had initially been overawed by the occasion.’
      • ‘To celebrate this momentous occasion, have all your neighbors get together for a good old fashioned barbeque.’
      • ‘She was crowned at the end of a gala occasion on Sunday night.’
      • ‘Her family and friends, along with staff at St. Joseph's, had a right old party bash celebrating the occasion.’
      social event, event, affair, function, celebration, party, ceremony, get-together, gathering
      View synonyms
    2. 1.2 A suitable or opportune time for doing something.
      ‘elections are an occasion for registering protest votes’
      • ‘Thankfully, they are all still fit and well and could still turn on the style if the occasion arose.’
      • ‘Opportunity refers to the occasion suitable for or conducive to the behavior, including such factors as geography and time.’
      • ‘I reckon that birthdays are more suitable occasions for resolutions than New Year.’
      • ‘Whenever the occasion arose to work in a different area or learn new skills, I welcomed it.’
      • ‘The Bodhisattva can be represented as both male and female as need and occasion demand.’
      • ‘The special occasion gave guests the opportunity to meet the director, singers and dancers of the world renown opera.’
      • ‘I struggle to recall those rare occasions when it has been invoked against a non-Arab state.’
      • ‘Having some occasions or opportunities to do so is always rewarding and inspiring.’
      • ‘The controversy provided a rare occasion for agreement between the ruling right and opposition left.’
      • ‘Raf was a great playmate to have around and could be serious when the occasion arose.’
      • ‘We addicts can always come up with suitable justifications when the occasion demands.’
      • ‘I promised myself that I'd tell Karl as soon as the occasion arose.’
      • ‘At once, occasion arose for versions of reality to compete for public credibility.’
      • ‘Ms. Ayotte said she was prepared to issue a formal opinion to that effect if the occasion arose.’
      • ‘Instead of passing the ball off every time, he took shots around the arch when the occasion arose.’
      • ‘The occasion arose through the trip of the old people to Poppleton, given by Captain Grace, on the ‘River King’ a few weeks before.’
      • ‘The occasion afforded staff the opportunity of paying tribute to a long-standing member of staff.’
      • ‘Each situation is different, and must be assessed individually when the occasion arises.’
      • ‘The Assembly used this rare occasion to chat about everything and nothing and just enjoy the time they spent together.’
      opportunity, opportune time, suitable time, right moment, chance, opening, window
      View synonyms
  • 2formal Reason; cause.

    with infinitive ‘it's the first time that I've had occasion to complain’
    • ‘Actually, there is no special occasion or reason to buy the stuff.’
    • ‘I often have occasion to be reminded of the man who, as executive deputy mayor, was the face and the voice of Buffalo City.’
    • ‘There may be occasion at work and reason at home, for you to lose your cool or balance but that's not helpful so avoid extremes of any kind.’
    • ‘For the first thirty years of my academic career, I had no occasion and no reason to worry about sports.’
    • ‘Our certainty, whether grounded in reason or miraculous signs, affords no occasion to trust.’
    • ‘I think you are somewhat reserved, but my daughter does not seem to mind your taciturnity, so I suppose I have no occasion to complain.’
    • ‘About this time last year I had occasion to complain about the non-collection of my refuse bin.’
    reason, cause, call, grounds, justification, need, necessity, requirement, excuse, pretext, stimulus, inducement, provocation, motive
    View synonyms

verb

[WITH OBJECT]formal
  • Cause (something)

    ‘something vital must have occasioned this visit’
    with two objects ‘his death occasioned her much grief’
    • ‘Last year, the lights were not removed until March, occasioning embarrassment for both the Chamber and the Council.’
    • ‘His death occasioned an outpouring of condolences, mourning, and reflection.’
    • ‘The loss occasioned by cancellation of hotel bookings and other expenses runs into the billions of shillings.’
    • ‘These rites control the pollution occasioned by death, and also usher the soul from one life to another.’
    • ‘In addition, she received an apology for any injustice occasioned to her.’
    • ‘After a long delay occasioned by France, the treaty entered into force in 1985.’
    • ‘But all in all, what with the weather and a degree of jadedness occasioned by a bit of sleep disturbance, it's not been a thrilling day.’
    • ‘His passing occasioned deep grief in his native Ballinrobe where he was deservedly held in very high regard.’
    • ‘Much sadness was occasioned by the sudden death of well known Claremorris chemist Sean O'Brien at the weekend.’
    • ‘Do you have to show that the error is one which occasions an injustice to your client?’
    • ‘The injustices occasioned by these institutions should, however, be confronted as an aspect of spiritual practice.’
    • ‘Johnston has been charged with malicious wounding and assault occasioning actual bodily harm.’
    • ‘In principle any losses occasioned thereby are recoverable however they may be characterised.’
    • ‘Much sadness was occasioned around the area by the news of her sudden death.’
    • ‘The jury took two hours to convict him of assault occasioning actual bodily harm.’
    • ‘His death shortly afterwards occasioned louder public grief than that of Louis XV four years earlier.’
    • ‘Patrick was a popular and esteemed member of the local rural community and much sadness was occasioned by his death.’
    • ‘The father was charged with assault occasioning actual bodily harm, but was acquitted.’
    • ‘My examination of terms such as fraught and wrought has occasioned controversy.’
    cause, give rise to, bring about, result in, lead to, prompt, provoke, evoke, elicit, call forth, produce, create, arouse, make, make for, generate, engender, originate, effect, bring on, induce, precipitate, stir up, inspire, spark off, trigger, breed
    View synonyms

Phrases

  • on occasion (or occasions)

    • Occasionally; from time to time.

      ‘on occasion, the state was asked to intervene’
      • ‘My students used to ask on occasions whether they were different from my students in Czechoslovakia.’
      • ‘We have lost by half a point and one point on occasions and probably have the most second places in Panorama.’
      • ‘The Laois lads continued to dominate the exchanges but on occasions were guilty of some wayward passes.’
      • ‘Early on, maybe, I was a little rusty on occasions, but I felt much better as the match went on.’
      • ‘A post as full-time director of the charity has meant that he has been on occasions unavailable for team selection.’
      • ‘The three journalists who interviewed Putin for this book are pleasingly sassy on occasion.’
      • ‘Celebrity Melinda has also been persuaded to join him on occasions.’
      • ‘His health is such that he turns blue on occasions and is unable to breathe.’
      • ‘Once there, Joe's life became one of living in hostels or, on occasions, even sleeping rough.’
      • ‘Now bear in mind this is the same person who, on occasions, will spend hours on her make-up before she'll set foot out the door.’
  • rise to the occasion

    • Perform very well in response to a special situation or event.

      • ‘The team rose to the occasion and responded magnificently.’
      • ‘Along with the epic quality of the storytelling come performances that rise to the occasion.’
      • ‘Nadia rose to the occasion, performing almost flawlessly.’
      • ‘Australians who came into the game with a ‘must win’ situation rose to the occasion in fine style and outplayed the Kiwis.’
      • ‘Still this is a masterful performance by Andsnes who rises to the occasion quite wonderfully.’
      • ‘Many teens will rise to the occasion by taking on responsibilities and providing support for other family members.’
      • ‘I also like the fact that he doesn't just rise to the occasion in certain events that suit his style.’
      • ‘There is some fine virtuoso writing here too, and the performers certainly rise to the occasion.’
      • ‘Morrisons staff in Keighley are fired up about their store's latest improvement and hope customers will rise to the occasion.’
      • ‘As the event unfolded, Samuel rose to the occasion.’
  • take occasion

    • archaic Make use of an opportunity to do something.

      • ‘Here I must take occasion to tell you, there are five faults will be found in heaven with your best fruits.’
      • ‘The member does not even know the Standing Orders, and he should take occasion over the adjournment to read them.’
      • ‘For I am possessed of a cat, surpassing in beauty, from whom I take occasion to bless Almighty God.’
      • ‘I took occasion from thence to speak strongly to her, concerning the hand of God, and his design in all afflictions.’
      • ‘But sin, taking occasion by the Commandment, wrought in me all manner of concupiscence.’

Origin

Late Middle English: from Latin occasio(n-) ‘juncture, reason’, from occidere ‘go down, set’, from ob- ‘towards’ + cadere ‘to fall’.

Pronunciation

occasion

/əˈkāZHən//əˈkeɪʒən/